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How do I modify an int atomically and thread-safely in Java?

Atomically increment, test & set, etc...?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Use AtomicInteger.

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Which is fine if all you need is the limited set of operations it provides. The "etc" in the question suggests more flexibility. –  skaffman Jul 20 '09 at 8:34
3  
Does it ? If he's looking for more, he should be more explicit. AtomicInteger seems to be the right answer in the meantime –  Brian Agnew Jul 20 '09 at 8:35
1  
Also have a look at the other classes in the java.util.concurrent package. They can be helpful for the "etc"-stuff –  Roland Jul 20 '09 at 8:37

Thread safety can be achieved via synchronized functions. Wrap your int (or such data) in a class which provides the required functionalities via synchronized methods, e.g.

public class X
{
  protected int x;
  public synchronized void set( int value )
  {
    x = value;
  }
}

You can also use classes from the java.util.concurrent.atomic package, e.g. AtomicInteger or AtomicIntegerArray

Why this answer won't work

I just wanted to be sure to point out exactly what is wrong with this answer, in case anyone things that synchronized can be used to solve thread race effects

| Thread A      | Thread B         | 
|---------------|------------------|
| read x (x=4)  |                  |
|               | read x (x=4)     |
| Calculate 4+1 |                  |
| EAX ← 5       |                  |
|               | Calculate 4+1    |
|               | EAX ← 5          |
| Start sync    |                  |
| {             | Start sync       |
| { x ← 5       |    wait          |
| {             |    wait          |
| End sync      |    wait          |
|               | {                | 
|               | { x ← 5          |
|               | {                | 
|               | End sync         |

The end result of the operations:

x = 4;
x += 1;
x += 1;

is that x = 5 rather than 6.

The same issue exists with the volatile keyword. The volatile keyword doesn't save you from thread effects. The volatile keyword only ensures that

  • caches are flushed before a variable is read
  • caches are flushed after a value is written

Strictly speaking, volatile ensures that memory operations are not reordered around a volatile variable. Which means you still suffer from the:

  • read from x
  • write to x

problem.

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Synchronized is pretty heavy weight and wouldn't really serve as an effective replacement for Interlocked. People use Interlocked because it's fast and lightweight. –  Deeko Oct 25 '14 at 13:07

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