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I have the following class design for my PDO database access class.

Where is the best location for $conn = new db(); (currently within Database.php)? Keeping in mind an MVC style framework, with Main.php being the controller, and the other two being Models.

Thanks.

Database.php

class db {
    private $conn;

    public function __construct() {
        $this->conn = new PDO(...);
    }

    $conn = new db();
}

Class.php

// require Database.php

class someClass {
    private $conn;

    public function __construct(db $conn) {
        $this->conn = $conn;
    }

    function myFunc($usr, $pwd) { 
        // SQL
    } 
}

Main.php

// require Class.php
$myObj = new someClass($conn);

$myObj->myFunc(PARAMS);
share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by tereško, PeeHaa, rdlowrey, ircmaxell, j0k Jul 28 '12 at 16:30

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1  
Why do you reinevent the wheel? Use Something like Doctrine2 or an other ORM. –  Stony Jul 17 '12 at 14:11
2  
Your precedent post where migrated to codereview. Why do you re-post it ? –  j0k Jul 17 '12 at 14:21
    
Yes, you are correct in that the code is the same. My question however differs, in that on this post I am concerned with the optimal way to instantiate the $conn object. The post on codeoverview relates to the design pattern itself, which I would also appreciate you feedback on. Thanks. –  Craig Wilson Jul 17 '12 at 14:28
5  
I would take the suggestion to use "Something like Doctrine2 or an other ORM" with a grain of salt. It's a growing opinion among people who know that ORM is an anti-pattern. I'd recommend avoiding Doctrine altogether (it's a cluster-f). Instead, research Gateways and DataMappers, which will prevent you from tightly coupling your code to the backend persistence mechanism. –  rdlowrey Jul 28 '12 at 16:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As you can tell, $conn needs to be declared outside of the someClass definition and before you instantiate someclass. So, there are two options that I can think of:

Declare it before you create the $myObj object and pass it to the constructor:

 $conn = new db();
 $myObj = new someClass($conn);

Or, use the singleton design pattern in the db class:

 $conn = db::getInstance();
 $myObj = new someClass($conn);

Where db::getInstance() is defined as:

class db {
    private $conn;

    // Don't let anyone instantiate this class by themselves
    private function __construct() {
        $this->conn = new PDO(...);
    }

    private static $instance = null;
    public static getInstance() {
        if( self::$instance === null) {
            self::$instance = new db();
        } 
        return self::$instance;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. So where would I call $conn = db::getInstance();? –  Craig Wilson Jul 17 '12 at 14:30
    
@Downvoter - Any comment? –  nickb Jul 28 '12 at 16:06
2  
-1 Sure. Why not. Stop telling people to use singletons, when they clearly are capable to grasp dependency injection. What you are recommending is to introduce an antipattern. –  tereško Jul 28 '12 at 16:09
    
Hence both patterns in the answer... –  nickb Jul 28 '12 at 16:10
1  
What you call "first pattern" is single sentence to fill some mystical checkbox. Then you happily go on recommending singleton (and yes, when most of the code in answer is for a particular type of solution, it is a recommendation). You seem particularly fond of this antipattern. –  tereško Jul 28 '12 at 16:18

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