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so basically here is my script:

http://jsfiddle.net/JJFap/42/

Code -

jQuery(document).ready(function() {
    var rel = new Array();
    var count = 0;
    jQuery(".setting").each(function() {
        rel[count] = [];
        if(jQuery("span").attr("rel")) {
            rel[count].push(jQuery("span").attr("rel"));
        }  
        console.log(count);
        count++;
    });               
    jQuery("body").text(rel);
    console.log(rel);
});​

and

<div class="setting">
    <span rel="Variable">Variable</span>
    <span rel="Item">Item</span>
    <span rel="Something">Something</span>
</div>
<div>
    <span rel="Smth">Smth</span>
    <span>Sec</span>
</div>
<div class="setting">
    <span>Second</span>
    <span rel="first">First</span>
    <span rel="Third">Third</span>
</div>

​my question, is why does it display Variable, variable?

I would like it to display Variable, First, but I'm not able to do.

Basically what I would like to achieve is create new array, in which insert each div.setting span elements with rel attribute array.

So basically in this example it should output -

Array (

   Array[0] => "Variable","Item","Something";

   Array[1] => "first","Third";

)

Hope you understood what I meant :)

EDIT:

In my other example I tried to add jQuery("span").each(function() ... inside first each function, but it outputted two full arrays of all span elements with rel. I can't have different classes / ids for each div element, since all will have same class.

share|improve this question
    
Any reason rel is an array of arrays, each of which has just one item? –  Utkanos Jul 17 '12 at 14:16
    
I think the key to your issue is the jQuery .find() function. That lets you find elements starting from a particular point in the DOM tree. –  Pointy Jul 17 '12 at 14:16
    
I wish all SO questions were prepared as well as this one. –  Blazemonger Jul 17 '12 at 14:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In addition to what has been said, you can also get rid of the count and one push() when using jQuery.fn.map() as well as getting rid of the if when adding [rel] to the selector:

jQuery(document).ready(function() {
    var rel = [];
    jQuery(".setting").each(function() {
        rel.push(jQuery(this).find('span[rel]').map(function() {
            return this.getAttribute('rel');
        }).get());
    });               
    jQuery("body").text(rel);
    console.log(rel);
});
share|improve this answer
    
Cheers! This is working :). I'll accept ASAP. –  y2ok Jul 17 '12 at 14:22

jQuery('span') is going to find ALL spans in your page, and then pull out the rel attribute of the first one. Since you don't provide a context for that span search, you'll always get the same #1 span in the document.

share|improve this answer
    
Should I add jQuery(this).children("span") ? Would that fix the problem? –  y2ok Jul 17 '12 at 14:16

You should be using this:

    jQuery('span',this).each(function() {
        rel[count] = [];
        if (jQuery(this).attr("rel")) {
            rel[count].push(jQuery(this).attr("rel"));
        }
        console.log(count);
        count++;
    })

instead of this:

    rel[count] = [];
    if(jQuery("span").attr("rel")) {
        rel[count].push(jQuery("span").attr("rel"));
    }  
    console.log(count);
    count++;

http://jsfiddle.net/mblase75/JJFap/52/

The trick is to use a second .each to loop over all the span tags inside each <div class="setting"> -- your original code was using jQuery("span"), which would just grab the first span tag in the document every time.

share|improve this answer
    
It outputs error in console. –  y2ok Jul 17 '12 at 14:16
    
Found and fixed. –  Blazemonger Jul 17 '12 at 14:18
    
I think this answer would be greatly improved if you explained why they should be using one approach over the other, or why the original approach is incorrect. –  Anthony Grist Jul 17 '12 at 14:19
    
Couldn't you just get rid of the if statement by doing $.each($(this).find('span[rel]') ?, also, why not show him how to protect a jQuery function so he doesn't have to write the god-awful 6 character long syntax of 'jQuery` each time! –  Ohgodwhy Jul 17 '12 at 14:27
    
@Ohgodwhy I assumed he was using jQuery for a good reason. There are probably any number of ways to further optimize this code, but for the purpose of helping the OP learn I keep my changes to his code to a minimum. –  Blazemonger Jul 17 '12 at 15:00

Within the .each() method, you have this code a couple times: jQuery("span").attr("rel"). That code simply looks for ALL span tags on the page. When you stick it inside the .push() method, it's just going to push the value for the rel attribute of the first jQuery object in the collection. Instead, you want to do something like $(this).find('span'). This will cause it to look for any span tags that are descendants of the current .setting element that the .each() method is iterating over.

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