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C#: using the iterator variable of foreach loop in a lambda expression - why fails?

I was reading c# reference at MSDN, and I found this..

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0yw3tz5k.aspx

at the end in comments there is one comment by albionmike It goes like this..

When you "catpure" a variable from an outer scope, some counter-intuitive things happen.
If you run this, you will get an IndexOutOfRange exception during the call f().
If you uncomment the two commented out lines of code, it will work as expected.
Hint: Captured Outer Variables have reference rather than value semantics

// Console Project
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;


namespace EvilDelegation
{
    delegate void PrintIt();

    class Program
    {

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string[] strings = { "zero", "one", "two", "three", "four" };
            PrintIt f = null;
            for (int i = 0; i < strings.Length; ++i) {
                if (i == 2 || i == 3) {
                    // Can you see why this would not work?
                    f = delegate() { Console.WriteLine(strings[i]); };

                    // But this does...
                    //int k = i;
                    //f = delegate() { Console.WriteLine(strings[k]); };

                }
            }
            f();
        }
    }
}

I don't get it, why the fist one won't work, and the second one will? In the 4th line, he says: Captured Outer Variables have reference rather than value semantics.
Okay, fine. But in the for loop, we defined i as an int which of course is a value type, so how can an int type hold a reference? And if i cannot hold reference, that means it is storing value, and if it is storing value, then I don't get why the first one wont work and second one will?
Am I missing something here?

EDIT : I think the original author had a typo the call to f() should have been inside the if loop. Please consider that this while answering.

EDIT 2 : Okay, in case someone might say, it was not a typo, let consider that it was. I wanna know the case where the call to f() is made inside the if clause. Would both run in that case, or just the one not commented?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Kirk Woll, cdhowie, Servy, Daniel Fischer, kapa Jul 18 '12 at 9:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
This was literally asked 18 minutes ago. –  Kirk Woll Jul 17 '12 at 14:40
    
@KirkWoll Well, its not that I came up with it, and didn't searched, I found it on MSDN and couldn't understand, thus asked here –  Razort4x Jul 17 '12 at 14:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is because of the semantics of closures. When a closure references a local variable in its outer scope, it captures a reference to the variable, not the value contained in the variable.

In this case, the anonymous delegate delegate() { Console.WriteLine(strings[i]); } is capturing a reference to the i variable; that is, the variable is shared between the anonymous function and the scope in which i was declared. When i changes in one context, it also changes in the other.

For example (see it run):

using System;

class Foo {
    static void Main() {
        int i = 0;
        Action increment = delegate { ++i; };

        Console.WriteLine(i);

        ++i;
        Console.WriteLine(i);

        increment();
        Console.WriteLine(i);

        ++i;
        Console.WriteLine(i);

        increment();
        Console.WriteLine(i);
    }
}

This will output:

0
1
2
3
4

In C#, the lifetime of a local is extended to include the lifetime of any closures that reference them. This enables some pretty interesting tricks that may offend the sensibilities of C/C++ developers:

static Func<int> Counter() {
    int i = 0;
    return delegate { return i++; };
}
share|improve this answer

You are accessing a modified closure. Your delegate will only be evaluated when it is called, and it has captured the loop variable i. At the time this will be accessed, after the loop is exited, its value will equal strings.Length. However, by introducing the local variable k within the loop, you are capturing the particular variable k for that iteration of the loop and the results are correct.

If the call is made within the loop, as you suggest in your comment below, then the value of i will be evaluated at that point, before the loop advances, and will have the "correct" value.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I think it was a typo, and say even if it was not. Then lets consider it a typo for a moment and lets say the call to f() was inside the if clause then what? Also, I've update the question to reflect the same. –  Razort4x Jul 17 '12 at 15:01

That's just by (unfortunate) design. When you use the loop variable i in your delegate, it's captured like that, and i will have its ultimate value when you reach the f() call.

It will soon change for foreach variables, according to this blog post by Eric Lippert, but not for for variables (which is what you have in your example).

Addition:

Here's an example with foreach instead of for:

  string[] strings = { "zero", "one", "two", "three", "four" }; 

  var list = new List<PrintIt>();

  foreach (var str in strings)
  {
    PrintIt f = delegate { Console.WriteLine(str); };  // captures str
    list.Add(f);
  }
  var f0 = list[0];
  f0();

In my .NET version (.NET 4.0, C# 4) the last line prints "four". In the upcoming .NET version (.NET 4.5, C# 5, Visual Studio 2012) it will print "zero", as I understand it. Breaking changes...

Of course, delegate { Console.WriteLine(str); } is equivalent to delegate() { Console.WriteLine(str); } in this case which is equivalent to () => { Console.WriteLine(str); }.

share|improve this answer
    
This is not at all unfortunate design. Closure is a very powerful concept and enables some very cool functional programming tricks. Capture-by-reference semantics have existed in other languages (lisp, scheme) for years. Rather, it is unfortunate how many people misunderstand the concept. –  cdhowie Jul 17 '12 at 14:42
    
@cdhowie Yeah, but see my edit above. Now there's a link to a blog by Lippert where he explains the "unfortunate" story. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jul 17 '12 at 14:46
    
Hmm. I guess I'm familiar enough with closure to expect that behavior, so it doesn't appear unfortunate to me at all. –  cdhowie Jul 17 '12 at 14:52

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