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I am trying to integrate omniauth-identity to my application. According to the README files, we just need to write:

class Identity < OmniAuth::Identity::Models::ActiveRecord
  # Add whatever you like! 
end

However I want to add uniqueness validation. so the easy way is to add this validation to Identity class:

validates_uniqueness_of :email, :case_sensitive => false

But then when I browse through the gem source code, I see this auth_key= method in the OmniAuth::Identity::Models::ActiveRecord as follows:

    def self.auth_key=(key)
      super
      validates_uniqueness_of key, :case_sensitive => false
    end

And because I hate duplicate code, I want to use the existing method instead of writing one additional line. So I changed the Identity class into

class Identity < OmniAuth::Identity::Models::ActiveRecord
  # Add whatever you like! 
  auth_key :email
end

But I am still experiencing duplicate emails (it looks like validation doesn't work). Hence I tried the following Identity.auth_key = 'my_key' and it gave me error NoMethodError: super: no superclass methodauth_key=' for #`

Any idea what I did wrong here? of course I can change auth_key= method definition into auth_key in the OmniAuth::Identity::Models::ActiveRecord, but I hate to do it because I think I am missing something here.

Thank you

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Did my answer below help? –  Dom Sep 27 '12 at 21:00
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1 Answer 1

You're almost there... you provide the Identity class and inherit from OmniAuth::Identity::Models::ActiveRecord, and to specify the column OmniAuth Identity should use to locate the record, just use the auth_key setter method. Any validations should be included in your Identity class as they normally would with any other ActiveRecord model.

The auth_key is simply a getter/setter (virtual attribute) for the column you choose to locate the record when authenticating, it is not a column itself, unless you choose to create an auth_key column in your Identity model.

Also note that the default method sought by OmniAuth Identity is the #email attribute (https://github.com/intridea/omniauth-identity/blob/master/lib/omniauth/identity/model.rb#L41) so setting the auth_key is redundant if you choose to stick with the #email attribute.

# app/models/identity.rb
class Identity < OmniAuth::Identity::Models::ActiveRecord
  belongs_to :user
  attr_accessible :email, :password, :password_confirmation, :user_id

  validates :email, :presence => true, :uniqueness => true, :case_sensitive => false
  validates :password, :presence => true, :confirmation => true
  validates :password_confirmation, :presence => true
end

# db/migrate/xxxxxxxxxxxxxx_create_identities.rb
class CreateIdentities < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :identities, :force => true do |t|
      t.column :email, :string, :null => false
      t.column :password_digest, :string
      t.column :user_id, :integer, :null => false
    end

    change_table :identities do |t|
      t.index :email, { :unique => true }
      t.index :user_id
    end
  end
end

# config/initializers/omniauth.rb
use OmniAuth::Builder do
  provider :identity, :fields => [:email]
end

If you decide to change the auth_key column to something else, for example #username, you would then use the auth_key setter as follows:

# app/models/identity.rb
class Identity < OmniAuth::Identity::Models::ActiveRecord
  auth_key 'username'
  belongs_to :user
  attr_accessible :password, :password_confirmation, :username, :user_id

  validates :password, :presence => true, :confirmation => true
  validates :password_confirmation, :presence => true
  validates :username, :presence => true, :uniqueness => true
end

# db/migrate/xxxxxxxxxxxxxx_create_identities.rb
class CreateIdentities < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :identities, :force => true do |t|
      t.column :password_digest, :string
      t.column :username, :string, :null => false
      t.column :user_id, :integer, :null => false
    end

    change_table :identities do |t|
      t.index :username, { :unique => true }
      t.index :user_id
    end
  end
end

# config/initializers/omniauth.rb
use OmniAuth::Builder do
  provider :identity, :fields => [:username]
end

Note, the auth_key method accepts a string parameter and not a symbol like attr_accessible.

OmniAuth Identity is very flexible and you have several other customizations you can take advantage of to suit an existing project. You can set a custom class for your identity model and you can customize the way that matching records are found when authenticating. See https://github.com/intridea/omniauth-identity/blob/master/README.markdown.

I hope this all helps, I know it had me confused for a while, and I had to delve into and understand the OmniAuth Identity source code.

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I couldn't find that auth_key method for the life of me, thanks. –  Micah Alcorn Jun 20 '13 at 23:01
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