Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why do classes in C++ have to declare their private functions? Has it actual technical reasons (what is its role at compile time) or is it simply for consistency's sake?

share|improve this question
    
Are you asking why the functions themselves have to be declared, or are you asking why you have to say private for those functions? –  GManNickG Jul 17 '12 at 15:17
1  
@GManNickG 1st one. I just don't know why other classes including my header have to know about its private functions –  Ancurio Jul 17 '12 at 15:19
1  
private and virtual are orthogonal concepts. The fact that a function is private does not imply that it is not virtual (as a matter of fact there is a whole idiom around having only private virtual and public non-virtual member functions), so yes, the presence affect the vtable. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 17 '12 at 15:29
1  
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas good point. I actually didn't know virtual private functions could be overridden in child classes and have their base classes call the new version without exposing callability(is this even a word?) –  Ancurio Jul 17 '12 at 15:41
2  
@Ancurio: The word you want is 'accessibility'. –  GManNickG Jul 17 '12 at 15:48
show 2 more comments

7 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

I asked why private functions had to be declared at all, as they don't add anything (neither object size nor vtable entry) for other translation units to know

If you think about it, this is similar to declaring some functions static in a file. It's not visible from the outside, but it is important for the compiler itself. The compiler wants to know the signature of the function before it can use it. That's why you declare functions in the first place. Remember that C++ compilers are one pass, which means everything has to be declared before it is used.1

From the programmer's point of view, declaring private functions is still not completely useless. Imagine 2 classes, one of which is the friend of the other. The friendzoned class2 would need to know how the privates of that class look like, (This discussion is getting weird) otherwise they can't use it.

As to why exactly C++ was designed in this way, I would first say there is the historical reason: the fact that you can't slice a struct in C, was adopted by C++ so you can't slice a class (and adopted by other languages branched from C++, too). I'd also guess that it's about simplicity: Imagine how difficult it would be to devise a method of compilation in which you can split the class among different header files, let your source files know about it, and prevent others from adding stuff to your class.

A final note is that, private functions can affect vtable size. That is, if they are virtual.


1 Actually not entirely. If you have inline functions in the class, they can refer to functions later defined in the same class. But probably the idea started from single pass and this exception later added to it.

2 It's inlined member functions in particular.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yeah, I'm used to hiding implementation in C by using static C functions, that's why I'd have expected to simply declare (before any implementation) private functions inside the cpp apart from the rest, just like static declarations in C –  Ancurio Jul 17 '12 at 15:26
    
The "friend" use case however is a valid point. Thanks. –  Ancurio Jul 17 '12 at 15:26
    
@Ancurio, even though what you say absolutely makes sense, unfortunately there is no support from C++ to slice a class definition in two. –  Visa is Racism Jul 17 '12 at 15:29
1  
Having the signatures declared before usage is only vaguely related to why they have to be in the class itself. The friendzoned class doesn't need to know the privates of the other, it's member function definitions need to know the privates. That can also come later/outside the class. And there are interesting things you can do with templates which could be said to slice a class definition in two. Which reminds me, class definitions with inline functions are two-pass, not one pass. Thats why you can use members/functions in a member function definition before that member is declared. –  Mooing Duck Jul 17 '12 at 15:45
    
@MooingDuck, indeed, I am aware that the pass on the class declaration itself is not one-pass. However, this still applies since most of the times you define the functions outside the class, after the class has been declared. Like I said in a comment above, it would have been nice if you could put the declarations of private members/functions in an internal header file, but there is no direct support for it. (You can always have a void *internal;, but that's just a workaround). –  Visa is Racism Jul 17 '12 at 15:55
show 2 more comments

You have to declare all members in the definition of the class itself so that the compiler knows which functions are allowed to be members. Otherwise, a second programmer could (accidentally?) come along and add members, make mistakes, and violate your object's guarantees, causing undefined behavior and/or random crashes.

share|improve this answer
7  
I think you just described Python classes =) –  JoeFish Jul 17 '12 at 16:03
add comment

There's a combination of concerns, but:

  • C++ doesn't let you re-open a class to declare new members in it after its initial definition.
  • C++ doesn't let you have different definitions of a class in different translation units that combine to form a program.

Therefore:

  • Any private member functions that the .cpp file wants declared in the class need to be defined in the .h file, which every user of the class sees too.

From the POV of practical binary compatibility: as David says in a comment, private virtual functions affect the size and layout of the vtable of this class and any classes that use it as a base. So the compiler needs to know about them even when compiling code that can't call them.

Could C++ have been invented differently, to allow the .cpp file to reopen the class and add certain kinds of additional member functions, with the implementation required to arrange that this doesn't break binary compatibility? Could the one definition rule be relaxed, to allow definitions that differ in certain ways? For example, static member functions and non-virtual non-static member functions.

Probably yes to both. I don't think there's any technical obstacle, although the current ODR is very strict about what makes a definition "different" (and hence is very generous to implementations in allowing binary incompatibilities between very similar-looking definitions). I think the text to introduce this kind of exception to the rule would be complex.

Ultimately it might come down to, "the designers wanted it that way", or it might be that someone tried it and encountered an obstacle that I haven't thought of.

share|improve this answer
    
The current modules proposals have solutions to the privacy issue, simply because they add another "layer" or "room" of visibility: The class itself, the module, the "outer code". private will then simply not leak outside the module definition, and the compiler can still know about everything. –  Xeo Jul 17 '12 at 18:50
    
"C++ doesn't let you re-open a class to declare new members in it after its initial definition." That is not correct: 14.7.3 Explicit specialization [temp.expl.spec] "An explicit specialization of any of the following: (...) — member class template of a class or class template — member function template of a class or class template can be declared by a declaration (...)" "An explicit specialization shall be declared in a namespace enclosing the specialized template." –  curiousguy Jul 22 '12 at 8:57
    
@curiousguy: not sure I follow you. I don't think that a specialization of a member template is a "new member", since the template is the member. I may be wrong. If I am wrong then of course templates are an exception to what I was saying, since as well as specializing member templates outside the class you can of course also instantiate member templates outside the class. In neither case do I think that the class has been "re-opened", and I don't think it helps the questioner. –  Steve Jessop Jul 23 '12 at 8:08
    
@SteveJessop A template definition describes a potentially infinite set of specialisations. You can view a function template declaration as the "potential" declaration of an infinite set of functions, and a member template declaration as the "potential" declaration of an infinite set of members. You can count a new member template explicit specialisation as a new member or not. My point is that 1) a member template explicit specialisation is declared outside the class definition 2) its body is the body of a member function (if it is a function template). –  curiousguy Jul 23 '12 at 9:00
    
(...) "you can of course also instantiate member templates outside the class." Yes, but you cannot rewrite their definition. "In neither case do I think that the class has been "re-opened"," With an explicit specialisation, the class can be "re-opened". –  curiousguy Jul 23 '12 at 9:02
show 3 more comments

The access level does not affect visibility. Private functions are visible to external code and may be selected by overload resolution (which would then result in an access violoation error):

class A {
    void F(int i) {}
public:
    void F(unsigned i) {}
};

int main() {
    A a;
    a.F(1); // error, void A::F(int) is private
}

Imagine the confusion when this works:

class A {
public:
    void F(unsigned i) {}
};

int main() {
    A a;
    a.F(1);
}

// add private F overload to A
void A::F(int i) {}

But changing it to the first code causes overload resolution to select a different function. And what about the following example?

class A {
public:
    void F(unsigned i) {}
};

// add private F overload to A
void A::F(int i) {}

int main() {
    A a;
    a.F(1);
}

Or here's another example of this going wrong:

// A.h
class A {
public:
    void g() { f(1); }
    void f(unsigned);
};

// A_private_interface.h
class A;
void A::f(int);

// A.cpp
#include "A_private_interface.h"
#include "A.h"

void A::f(int) {}
void A::f(unsigned) {}

// main.cpp
#include "A.h"

int main() {
    A().g();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Eh, this seems to only point out that overloading rules would need to change. –  GManNickG Jul 17 '12 at 15:49
    
@GManNickG To take visibility into account and not select inaccessible methods? C++ has good reason for the way it works. For example: stackoverflow.com/questions/644461/… –  bames53 Jul 17 '12 at 16:11
    
I don't think the overloading rules would need to take accessibility into account. They'd probably just have to be defined to only take into account member functions which are declared before the point of use -- so if your private member function is in the class definition then it stops a.F(1) compiling in client code, and if it's added only in A.cpp then it doesn't affect client code but does affect the .cpp. This is already how namespaces work (if you add more overloads, they might get selected). There's some complexity required, for example what happens with two-phase lookup. –  Steve Jessop Jul 17 '12 at 16:22
    
@SteveJessop Of course that could be done, but I think it'd be quite a significant change. For example, currently the scope for class members is the entire class, even before the class member is declared. I don't think the complexity is warranted because it only solves one special case of the underlying problem that is the C++ compilation model, and there are already workarounds that solve that special case. –  bames53 Jul 18 '12 at 15:29
    
I agree that the change isn't needed, I'm just imagining the confusion as instructed, and I don't think it's all that confusing. Class members declared in the class definition could of course continue to be visible anywhere in the class as before. Members added by this hypothetical new mechanism would have different visibility, since that's the entire purpose of the new mechanism. –  Steve Jessop Jul 18 '12 at 15:43
show 2 more comments

One reason is that in C++ friends can access your privates. For friends to access them, friends have to know about them.

share|improve this answer
    
@Neal: Well... that's the friggin purpose of friends. –  Xeo Jul 17 '12 at 17:37
add comment

Private members of a class are still members of the class, so they must be declared, as the implementation of other public members might depend on that private method. Declaring them will allow the compiler to understand a call to that function as a member function call.

If you have a method that only is used int the .cpp file and does not depend on direct access to other private members of the class, consider moving it to an anonymous namespace. Then, it does not need to be declared in the header file.

share|improve this answer
1  
yes, but why does the spec say they must be declared? You didnt answer the question. There s already rules saying functions must be declared before calling, so that's not it. (the namespace tip is a good one though) –  Mooing Duck Jul 17 '12 at 15:24
add comment

There are a couple of reason on why private functions must be declared.

First Compile Time Error Checks

the point of access modifiers is to catch certain classes (no pun intended) of programming errors at compile time. Private functions are functions that, if someone called them from outside the class, that would be a bug, and you want to know about it as early as possible.

Second Casting and Inheritance

Taken from the C++ standard:

3 [ Note: A member of a private base class might be inaccessible as an inherited member name, but accessible directly. Because of the rules on pointer conversions (4.10) and explicit casts (5.4), a conversion from a pointer to a derived class to a pointer to an inaccessible base class might be ill-formed if an implicit conversion is used, but well-formed if an explicit cast is used.

3rd Friends

Friends show each other there privates. A private method can be call by another class that is a friend.

4th General Sanity and Good Design

Ever worked on a project with another 100 developers. Having a standard and a general set of rule helps maintain maintainable. declaring something private has a specific meaning to everyone else in the group.

Also this flows into good OO design principles. What to expose and what not

share|improve this answer
3  
That's not want Ancurio wants to know. He wonders why we can't (some) keep private functions as a secret in the first place. You can't call a function that you don't know about. –  Nordic Mainframe Jul 17 '12 at 15:37
    
the compiler needs to know that its private. so it can kick out a compile time warning when someone else try to call it...nothing is ever really a secret –  nate_weldon Jul 17 '12 at 15:41
1  
@nate_weldon that's true, but if private non-virtual functions weren't declared in a public header file (and therefore documentation) in the first place, no one would attempt to call it. Except maybe for myself... in which case that warning (isn't it an error actually?) does make sense. –  Ancurio Jul 17 '12 at 15:45
    
accept for friends ...because friends show each other their privates –  nate_weldon Jul 17 '12 at 15:58
1  
from the standard 3 [ Note: A member of a private base class might be inaccessible as an inherited member name, but accessible directly. Because of the rules on pointer conversions (4.10) and explicit casts (5.4), a conversion from a pointer to a derived class to a pointer to an inaccessible base class might be ill-formed if an implicit conversion is used, but well-formed if an explicit cast is used. –  nate_weldon Jul 17 '12 at 16:00
show 2 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.