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In the Java Programming language the private keyword is used for data hiding - a field or a method marked as private is not visible outside the classes or the subclasses.

How is that achieved in javascript?

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6  
Private fields are achieved via significant masochism. –  biziclop Jul 17 '12 at 15:29
1  
As with most things related to JavaScript, Douglas Crockford has some interesting ideas about private members in that language. –  maerics Jul 17 '12 at 15:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In JavaScript standard way is to use Module Pattern as shown below..

var testModule = (function () {

    var myPrivateVar = 0;

    var myPrivateMethod = function (someText) {
        console.log(someText);
    };

    return {

        myPublicVar: "foo",

        myPublicFunction: function (bar) {
            myPrivateVar++;
            myPrivateMethod(bar);
        }

    };
})();

Usage: In the above code an object is returned which contains a variable (myPublicVar) and a function(myPublicFunction). Inside this function you can access the inner variable (myPrivateVar) and inner function(myPrivateMethod) but not from outside.

var mod = new testModule();
mod.myPublicFunction(param);
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Works great and recommended by Douglas Crockford himself :) –  awendt Jul 17 '12 at 15:29
    
Can you offer some explanation as to what occurs in your code and how exactly this covers data hiding in javascript - Thank you –  oneiros Jul 17 '12 at 17:10
1  
Look up "javascript closures" to understand how data can be maintained away from the public scope. Any function inside of another function creates a closure. The inner function can "remember what is around it". The example above demonstrates a function that EXECUTES IMMEDIATELY with (), thereby returning some inner references to the new object named "testModule". –  Billbad Jul 17 '12 at 19:42
    
"testModule" is an object, but not a function. How can you use "new testModule()" –  user1931858 Jan 24 '13 at 7:20

This all achieved with scoping.

var MYCLASS = function(){

     var priv_var = 0; //private var

     this.addToVar = function(){
         priv_var++;
     }

     this.showVar = function(){
         return priv_var;
     }

}

var mc = new MYCLASS;

mc.addTovar();
alert(mc.showVar()); //"1"
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"use strict";

var Person = function (fName, lName) {

    var firstName = fName || "AN", lastName = lName || "Other";

    var fullName = function () {
        return firstName + ' ' + lastName;
    };

    return {
        setName: function (fName, lName) {
            firstName = fName;
            lastName = lName;
        },

        getFullName: function() {
            return fullName();
        }
    };

}

var p = new Person("Your", "name");

console.log(p.getFullName());
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Here is a simple API that you might enjoy. It has three functions: Key (a constructor), KeepSecret, FetchSecret.

What you can do is to have an object with a secret-keeper as a property. The object can then "carry around" data, but code which accesses the object but does not know the key is unable to access the hidden data.

/**
 * Example usage:
 *
 * Create a key
 *
var mykey = Key();

 *
 * Keep a secret
 *
var mykeeper = KeepSecret(mykey, 42);

 *
 * Fetch the secret
 *
var answer = FetchSecret(mykey, mykeeper);

 *
 * 'answer' will then contain 42
 */

(function(Namespace, Code) { return Code(Namespace); })(
    /* Choose the namespace for Key, KeepSecret, FetchSecret */
    this,

    function(Namespace) {

/*
 * Simply so that we can use "Key" as both a type-name
 * and a parameter-name
 */
var ikey;

/** Constructor for a key */
function Key() {
    if (!(this instanceof Key))
      return new Key();
  }

/* Same key constructor */
ikey = Key;

/**
 * Hide a secret using a key
 *
 * @param Key
 *   The key to lock away the secret with
 *
 * @param Secret
 *   The secret to be locked away
 *
 * @return
 *   A function which hides the secret inside
 */
function KeepSecret(Key, Secret) {
    /* The function can access itself */
    var closure;

    if (!(Key instanceof ikey))
      throw "KeepSecret: Invalid key";

    closure = function(key) {
        /* If we were not passed the key, authenticate */
        if (key !== Key) {
            Key.keeper = closure;
            return;
          }

        /* The caller knew the key, so reveal the secret */
        return Secret;
      }
    return closure;
  }

/**
 * Use a key and a function to reveal the secret that function keeps
 *
 * @param Key
 *   The key for unlocking the secret
 *
 * @param Keeper
 *   The function keeping the secret
 *
 * @return
 *   The secret, if the key unlocks it
 */
function FetchSecret(Key, Keeper) {
    /* Tracks authentication */
    var closure;

    if (!(Key instanceof ikey) || !(Keeper instanceof Function))
      throw "FetchSecret: Invalid parameter(s)";

    /* Ask the keeper to authenticate */
    Keeper();

    /* Note the authenticated function */
    closure = Key.keeper;

    /* Clear the authentication */
    delete Key.keeper;

    /* Did the keeper prove that they know the key? */
    if (closure !== Keeper)
      /* No */
      return;

    /* They know the key.  Show we know the key, too */
    return closure(Key);
  }

Namespace.Key = Key;
Namespace.KeepSecret = KeepSecret;
Namespace.FetchSecret = FetchSecret;
return true;

  });
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