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I would like to understand how to correctly use MVVM and data binding when we are working with many properties.

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
<Grid>
    <TextBox Height="23" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="12,12,0,0" Name="textBox1" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="463" Text="{Binding OriginalText, UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged}" />
    <Label Height="28" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="12,242,0,0" Name="label1" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="463" Content="{Binding ModifiedText}"/>
    <CheckBox Content="Upper" Height="16" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="12,41,0,0" Name="checkBox1" VerticalAlignment="Top" />
    <CheckBox Content="Underline" Height="16" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="12,63,0,0" Name="checkBox2" VerticalAlignment="Top" />
    <CheckBox Content="Bold" Height="16" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="12,85,0,0" Name="checkBox3" VerticalAlignment="Top" />
    <CheckBox Content="Shadow" Height="16" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="12,107,0,0" Name="checkBox4" VerticalAlignment="Top" />
    <CheckBox Content="Red" Height="16" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="12,129,0,0" Name="checkBox5" VerticalAlignment="Top" />
    <CheckBox Content="Scary" Height="16" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="12,151,0,0" Name="checkBox6" VerticalAlignment="Top" />
    <CheckBox Content="Remove first letter" Height="16" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="12,173,0,0" Name="checkBox7" VerticalAlignment="Top" />
    <CheckBox Content="Remove last letter" Height="16" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="12,195,0,0" Name="checkBox8" VerticalAlignment="Top" />
</Grid>

I have a OriginalText TextBox and a ModifiedText Label. When I check a box I would like to directly apply the modification without having to click a button. How should I do that?

In my ViewModel I created all the properties that are binded to the XAML CheckBox.

    private string _originalText = string.Empty;
    public string OriginalText
    {
        get { return _originalText; }
        set
        {
            _originalText = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged("OriginalText");
        }
    }

    private string _modifiedText;
    public string ModifiedText
    {
        get { return _originalText; }
        set
        {
            _originalText = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged("ModifiedText");
        }
    }

    private bool upper;
    public bool Upper
    {
        get { return upper; }
        set
        {
            upper = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged("Upper");
            // Should I notify something else here or call a refresh method?
        }
    }

    private bool removeFirstLetter;
    public bool RemoveFirstLetter
    {
        get { return removeFirstLetter; }
        set
        {
            removeFirstLetter = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged("RemoveFirstLetter");
            // Should I notify something else here or call a refresh method?
        }
    }

    // ...

Then I created a Work method in the same ViewModel class at this moment. I ll move this method into the business later.

private void Work()
{ 
    string result = _originalText;
    if (Upper)
        result = result.ToUpper();
    if (removeFirstLetter)
        result = result.Substring(1, result.Length);
    // if ...
    ModifiedText = result; 
}

My question is when, where should I call the work method? Should I call it in each setter or getter? I dont like the idea. I do something wrong...

Thank you.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your particular case, you should create a Boolean property using the INotifyPropertyChanged interface. Now bind this property to your "IsChecked" check box property. By calling your Work() method inside the setter, every time the check box is "ticked" the setter will trigger each time.

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The answer to your question is very simple: Use Commands.

Commands are MVVM's way to realize the binding to a method in your ViewModel. The implementation of Commands follows a very standard pattern. You will find plenty of information over the Internet here is just a short sketch:

Commands implemented in your ViewModel have to be of type ICommand and every Command has to come along with to methods in your code one responsible for executing the actual method and the other one for checking if the execution is currently possible.

These methods have to be named CanExecute and Execute respectively. It is commonly the case to facilitate the use of several Commands with a small helping class called DelegateCommand which provides delegates for the previously mentioned methods.

Take this class as it is without any modifications:

public class DelegateCommand<T> : ICommand {

    private Predicate<T> canExecute;
    private Action<T> execute;

    public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged;

    public DelegateCommand (Predicate<T> canExecute, Action<T> execute) {

        this.canExecute = canExecute;
        this.execute = execute;
    }

    public bool CanExecute (object param) {

        return canExecute((T)param);
    }

    public void Execute (object param) {


        execute((T)param);
    }

    public void CanExecuteChangedRaised () {

        CanExecuteChanged(this, new EventArgs());
    }
}

Then your Command declarations are of type DelegateCommand rather than of type ICommand. See the following example to illustrate and you will get the idea:

Supose you have a method foo() in your ViewModel you want to be called with a click to a button:

class ViewModel {

    // ...

    public DelegateCommand<object> FooCommand { get; set; }

    public ViewModel () {

        FooCommand = new DelegateCommand<object>(CanExecuteFooCommand, ExecuteFooCommand);
    }

    public bool CanExecuteFooCommand (object param) {

        return true;
    }

    public void ExecuteFooCommand (object param) {

        foo();
    }

    // ...
}

Supposing you have set your ViewModel as the controls DataContext via it's DataContext property the only thing left to do is to bind the FooCommand to your button like this:

That's it!

APPENDIX (referring to comment):

In order to have some action take place without actually hitting the Button you would simply have to track any changed in the UI with your ViewModel and react accordingly - that's what MVVM is about: Track the data from the UI modify or process them and populate them back to the UI.

To react on a TextBox Text change create a corresponding string property in your ViewModel and track whether the new ioncoming value from the View is different to the current textBox text:

private string _text;

public string Text {
   get { return _text; }
   set {          
       // the text in the TextBox is about to change.
       if (!_text.Equals(value)) 
       {
        doSomething();
       }

       _text = value;
       FirePropertyChanged("Text");
   }
}

For doing the same with your CheckBox you can apply ICommand as described above since CheckBox is derived from Button and is therefor offering the Command property.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help. Actually I know I must create a ICommand on my button. My button do the Work() and Save() the result. My question is not about clicking the button but how can I call my Work() method to preview my result without saving hit in live each time my user check or uncheck an option or modify the original text. –  B413 Jul 18 '12 at 7:53
    
@DranDane See my Appendix. –  marc wellman Jul 18 '12 at 8:35

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