Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I am new to object definition in Javascript, and am trying to write a program that revolves objects as a practice. My problem is that when I am trying to define the object, some of the object properties are dependent on other parts of the object. I am not sure if this is even permitted, because in all my searching I have not been able to find any examples of it.

My question is basically this: can I use previously defined properties of an object to define that object. The most basic example of this would be something like this:

var alfred = {
    dogs: 1,
    cats:this.dogs+1,
}

Is this permitted? if so is this the right syntax? The reason I need to use a "this." is because I am pushing newly created objects to a array of objects.The code of mine that is not working is below:

obj.push({
    canvas:document.getElementById(canvasName),

    canvasName:"canvas"+objNum,
    image: img,
    width:objWidth,
    height:objHeight,
    centerX:posX,
    centerY:posY,
    speed:speeds,
    hypSquare:Math.sqrt((this.width*this.width)+(this.height*this.height)),
    angleInSquare:Math.atan(this.height/this.width),
    angle:startAngle,
    angleTotal:this.angle+this.angleInSquare,
    offX:(this.hypSquare* Math.cos(this.anglesTotal))/2,
    offY:(this.hypSquare* Math.sin(this.anglesTotal))/2,
    centeredX:this.centerX-this.offX,
    centeredY:this.centerY-this.offY,
})

when I call a

console.log(obj[objNum].hypSquare);

(where objNum is just the index of the object in the array) I will get NaN even though if I call

 console.log(obj[objNum].width);

I will get the value of objWidth. Is there just a syntactical issue, or is my understanding of objects fundamentally flawed...

Thank you in advance for your time!

Isaac

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, you can't do that. You have to close the object initializer and then add the other property, e.g.:

var alfred = {
    dogs: 1
};
alfred.cats = alfred.dogs + 1;

So for your obj.push call, you'll have to use a temporary variable (like alfred above), you can't just use an inline object initializer.

share|improve this answer
    
great! thanks so much for the advise. I was afraid I would have to do that, but such is life... –  Cabbibo Jul 17 '12 at 16:58

You cannot do that. However, you can use object constructors.

function Person(canvasName, objNum) {
  this.canvas = document.getElementById(canvasName);

  this.canvasName = "canvas" + objNum;
  ...
  this.centeredY = this.centerY - this.offY;
}

obj.push(new Person("alfred", 3));
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.