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Let me explain you in the following example what problem I'm solving:

class Animal {}
class Cat: Animal {}
class Dog : Animal { }

interface IAnimalHandler<in T> where T: Animal
{
    void Handle(T animal);
}

class AnimalHandler : 
    IAnimalHandler<Cat>,
    IAnimalHandler<Dog>
{
    public void Handle(Cat animal)
    {
        Console.Write("it's a cat !");
    }

    public void Handle(Dog animal)
    {
        Console.Write("it's a dog !");
    }
}

So now I want go through all animals and run appropriate handler like this:

  var ah = new AnimalHandler();
  var animals = new List<Animal> { new Cat(), new Dog() };
  animals.ForEach(a => ah.Handle(a));

However this code would not work (Can not resolve method Hanler<>...) just because .NET compiler needs to know before compilation which type is used here, so what might be the best solution for this issue? In other words, I need to ask .NET compiler to take appropriate handler of type T for every instance of type T in run-time. I do not want to use multiple if statements checking instance type.

UPDATE: Sorry for missing it, it seemed obvious to me, but now I understand it's not so obvious: AnimalHandler class contains logic not supposed to be part of domain objects Cat and Dog. Think about them as pure plain domain objects, I do not want them to know about any sort of handlers

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4  
Is there any reason why you can't or don't want to put the specific behaviors in your concrete Cat and Dog types? –  FishBasketGordo Jul 17 '12 at 17:16
    
To follow up on @FishBasketGordo, is there a reason you are putting the functionality in the AnimalHandler class? I.e., ie the Animal class had an abstract property Name that the Cat and Dog classes implemented (could be done w/interface also), then AnimalHandler becomes simpler, and just references animal.Name or whatever –  JohnKeller Jul 17 '12 at 17:26
1  
@FishBasketGordo: It's a quite simplified model of what I'm trying to implement. No, Cat and Dog can not handle themself coz they are domain model objects, while AnimalHandler contains business or UI or other sort of logic not supposed to be inside domain classes. –  YMC Jul 17 '12 at 18:11

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use C# 4 dynamic to move the overload resolution step from compile-time to runtime:

var ah = new AnimalHandler();
var animals = new List<Animal> { new Cat(), new Dog() };
animals.ForEach(a => ah.Handle((dynamic)a));
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To me it sounds like you could benefit from this pattern (implemented using StructureMap). Going from your original statement, "I need to ask .NET compiler to take appropriate handler of type T for every instance of type T in run-time" it might look something like this:

class Dog : Animal { }
class Cat : Animal { }

interface IHandler<T>
{
    void Handle(T eval);
}

class DogHandler : IHandler<Dog>
{
    public void Handle(Dog eval)
    {
        // do whatever
    }
}

class CatHandler : IHandler<Cat>
{
    public void Handle(Cat eval)
    {
        // do whatever
    }
}    

You could then configure StructureMap as per the linked article, and get the appropriate handler using:

var dogHandler = _container.GetInstance<IHandler<Dog>>(); // instance of DogHandler
var catHandler = _container.GetInstance<IHandler<Cat>>(); // instance of CatHandler

UPDATE: To resolve these in a loop you could do something like this:

foreach (var animal in animals)
{
    var concreteHandlerType = typeof(IHandler<>).MakeGenericType(animal.GetType());
    var handler = _container.GetInstance(concreteHandlerType);
    handler.Handle(animal);
}

I use this pattern in a fairly large system to accomplish the same goals (pure domain objects, handlers for logic that should not be inside those domain objects, simplified maintenance). It works well in a system where you want to have a separate handler class for each object.

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The question is how can I pick up appropriate handler by instance looping through the collection of animals without IFs –  YMC Jul 17 '12 at 18:21
    
See my edit to resolve these in a loop without if statements based on type information only. –  Shane Fulmer Jul 17 '12 at 18:41
    
Thank you, Shane. Your example works too, +1. However I like Daniel's approach a bit more as code is more concise and less changes are needed –  YMC Jul 17 '12 at 19:52

Exactly your code, but using reflection:

var ah = new AnimalHandler();
var animals = new List<Animal> { new Cat(), new Dog() };
animals.ForEach(a => {
  var method = ah.GetType().GetMethod("Handle", new Type[] {a.GetType()});
  method.Invoke(ah,new object[] { a });
});
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It works, thanks, +1. However I think using dynamic, as Daniel proposed, is a bit better in the case –  YMC Jul 17 '12 at 19:55

Why would you have specific handlers for each type of animal. Instead implementing multiple specific interfaces, just implement IAnimalHandler<T>, and just have a single Handle(T obj) method. If you then need type specific functionality you can handle it by calling typeof(obj) to get the specific type.

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It's a way to go, but my idea was to get rid of multiple ifs checking types, and each method is handling only its type of animal –  YMC Jul 17 '12 at 18:39

Here's an approach: Make an abstract method in Animal, something called "BeingHandled()" for example, and then all inheritors of Animal must provide their own implementation.

Then your AnimalHandler class would have a single Handle(Animal a) method:

class AnimalHandler
{
    public void Handle(Animal a)
    {
        a.BeingHandled();
    }
}

It doesn't matter which animal you pass to Handle() because anything that inherits from Animal must have proper implementation to work, and the compiler will know this because of the abstract method declaration within your Animal base class.

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Since you are using .NET 4.0 take advantage of covariance/contravariance to inject a handler for your types.

interface IAnimal
{
    string Name { get; set; }
}

class Dog : IAnimal
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

class Cat : IAnimal
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

interface IAnimalEvaluator<T>
{
    void Handle(IEnumerable<T> eval);
}

class AnimalHandler : IAnimalHandler<T> where T : IAnimal
{
    public void Handle(IEnumerable<T> eval)
    {
        foreach (var t in eval)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(t.Name);
        }
    }
}


List<Dog> dogs = new List<Dog>() { new Dog() { Name = "Bill Murray" } };
List<Cat> cats = new List<Cat>() { new Cat() { Name = "Walter Peck" } };

AnimalHandler <IAnimal> animalHandler = new AnimalHandler<IAnimal>();

animalEvaluator.Handle(dogs);
animalEvaluator.Handle(cats);
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Use the visitor pattern and double dispatch. It works like this. The handler can handle different types of animals. Instead of letting the handler choose the right method, the animals chooses the right method. This is easy, since the animal always needs the same method ("his" method).

class Animal
{
    string Name { get; set; }
    abstract public Handle(IAnimalHandler handler);
}

class Cat : Animal
{ 
    public overrides Handle(IAnimalHandler handler)
    {
        handler.Handle(this); // Chooses the right overload at compile time!
    }
}

class Dog : Animal
{ 
    public overrides Handle(IAnimalHandler handler)
    {
        handler.Handle(this); // Chooses the right overload at compile time!
    }
}

interface IAnimalHandler
{
    void Handle(Cat cat);
    void Handle(Dog dog);
}

class AnimalHandler : IAnimalHandler
{
    public void Handle(Cat cat)
    {
        Console.Write("it's cat {0}", cat.Name);
    }

    public void Handle(Dog dog)
    {
        Console.Write("it's dog {0}", dog.Name);
    }
}

Now you can handle animals like this

IAnimalHandler handler = new AnimalHandler();
animals.ForEach(a => a.Handle(handler));

handler = new SomeOtherAnimalHandler();
animals.ForEach(a => a.Handle(handler));
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1  
Sorry for not mentioned it, I do not want Can and Dog to be aware of any handler, thing about them as plain pure domain model objects –  YMC Jul 17 '12 at 18:30
    
Note that the animal does not know what the handler does, it just calls handler.Handle(this);. You could split your domain model into partial classes and put this call in a separate file. If you generate the domain class automatically (using a T4 for instance) this splitting would preserve the code entered manually. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jul 18 '12 at 12:08

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