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Why does it always show Invalid Password? It works in my other program but in this one it doesn't! I literally cant figure out why.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <windows.h>
#include <conio.h>
#define MAXLTR 15
int login(void);
void welcome(void);
void gotoxy(int x,int y);

int main(void)
{   
    char password[MAXLTR];
    printf("\nEnter password: ");
    //scanf("\n%s",&password);
    ltrcntr = 0;
    while(buffer != 13)
    {
        buffer = getch();
        if(buffer == 13)
                  break;
        printf("\b**");
        password[ltrcntr] = buffer;
        ltrcntr++;
    }
    if(strcmp(password,"dlsu") == 0)
    {
        system("cls");
        welcome();
    }
    else
        printf("\nInvalid Password, please rerun the program.\n");


}
void gotoxy(int x, int y)
{
     HANDLE eric;
     COORD pogi;
     pogi.X = x;
     pogi.Y =y;
     eric = GetStdHandle
     (STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE);
     SetConsoleCursorPosition
     (eric, pogi);
}
int login(void)
{
    char password[MAXLTR],buffer;
    int ltrcntr = 0;
    printf("Enter password: ");
    while(buffer != 13)
    {
        buffer = getch();
        if(buffer == 13)
                  break;
        printf("\b**");
        password[ltrcntr] = buffer;
        ltrcntr++;
    }
    if(strcmp(password,"dlsu")==0)
        return 1;

}

void welcome(void)
{
    system("Color 4F");
    gotoxy(35,56);
    printf("\nWelcome to SPACE INVADERS!");
}
share|improve this question
10  
it doesn't look you're nul-terminating password. –  Mysticial Jul 17 '12 at 17:31
    
Also, maximum 14 letters for a password? –  Shahbaz Jul 17 '12 at 17:32
    
A debugger makes miracles... :) –  nico Jul 17 '12 at 17:32
3  
@Mysticial, you just lost 90 reputations! –  Shahbaz Jul 17 '12 at 17:33
1  
@Shahbaz: very true! Everyone knows you need 25 letters for a good password. –  nico Jul 17 '12 at 17:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

C strings are NULL terminated (i.e., the last character is \0). All C functions which operate on strings expect this because it is the only way to know where the string ends. You array could be filled with anything as it is uninitialized. Try this:

char password[MAXLTR] = {0};

strcmp expects a NULL terminated string. Also, if a carriage return is never entered (and I don't even see where buffer is declared...) you will overrun your password buffer.

share|improve this answer
    
This won't work if the array has any garbage characters in it. –  Wug Jul 17 '12 at 17:36
    
@Wug: Not sure what you mean. The array will be initialized to all 0's using the method I suggested. 0 is a bit special in this case and will initialize every element. If the value is non-zero then that is not the case. –  Ed S. Jul 17 '12 at 17:37
    
Maybe I'm just seeing something I don't recognize. –  Wug Jul 17 '12 at 17:38
    
@Wug: char someArray[n] = {0} will initialize every element to 0. char someArray[n] = {1} would initialize only the first element to 1, and likewise char someArray[n] = {1, 1} would initialize the first two, etc. –  Ed S. Jul 17 '12 at 17:39
    
Thanks man! i guess i just didnt initialize it. –  Bulbo Jul 17 '12 at 17:40

Probably because your array isn't NULL terminated. Either zero it out first or change your loop to look like this:

while(ltrcntr < MAXLTR - 1) // protect from password that's too long
{
    buffer = getch();
    if(buffer == 13)
              break;
    password[ltrcntr] = buffer;
    ltrcntr++;
    printf("\b**");
}
password[ltrcntr] = 0; // null terminate after last character
share|improve this answer

It looks like you're not null-terminating the password buffer before using strcmp. C string utilities expect strings to be null-terminated.

After you've finished reading in each character of the password, add a null character, '\0' to password:

password[ltrcntr] = '\0';

Make sure that you've allowed an extra element in the array size for the null character.

share|improve this answer
    
nope that isnt it.. still wont work –  Bulbo Jul 17 '12 at 17:36

Reading character by character is unnecessary.

fgets(password,MAXLTR,stdio);

This stops after a newline or EOF, nul-terminates the string, and won't overrun the buffer.

share|improve this answer

You are not ensuring that as the password is checked character by character, that a terminating '\0' follows the last character. The password is not zero-terminated. That is pretty much all.

share|improve this answer
    
He's not storing the carriage return, he's checking for it and breaking the loop early. –  Ed S. Jul 17 '12 at 17:46
    
Hmmm okay 'while(buffer != 13)' confused me. My bad, i guess it is null terminated string. Edited my post –  Andy Stow Away Jul 17 '12 at 17:53
    
Understandable, it's not the most idiomatic way to read a string. –  Ed S. Jul 17 '12 at 17:54

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