Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How would you do this in C++? For example I'm trying to trigger a program exit both if the user presses ESC or 'q' or 'Q'.

I've tried looking for it, but I found no syntax for it in C++. I know how to do it with if-else, but is it possible with switch - case? Of course I can just make a function and call it from two separate case, but is there a way to do it just by combined case statement?

For example that's what I'm looking for (of course not working):

void keyboard( unsigned char key, int x, int y )
{
    switch( key )
    {
        case ( 27 || 'q' || 'Q' ):
            exit( 0 );
            break;

        case 'a': ...

                case 'b': ...
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
You can simplify your switch statement by using tolower or toupper first. –  Thomas Matthews Jul 17 '12 at 19:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 32 down vote accepted

Cases fall through without a break:

case  27: //could be 27
case 'q': //could be 27 or 'q'
case 'Q': //could be 27, 'q', or 'Q'
    exit(0);
    break;
share|improve this answer
    
Damn, beat me to it. –  Drise Jul 17 '12 at 17:39
    
Darn it I was totally at "break" when the new answer notification came up –  Pyrodante Jul 17 '12 at 17:39
2  
Story of my life. –  chris Jul 17 '12 at 17:39
4  
And ALWAYS put comments saying that the fallthrough is deliberate and why. –  TBohne Jul 17 '12 at 18:09
4  
@MooingDuck clang has [[clang::fallthrough]], which might be interesting as well. –  user1203803 Jul 21 '12 at 20:20

I believe it's just

switch(key){
 case 'a': case 'b':  
    /*code*/ 
    break;

    ...

Cases A and B will both execute the same code.

share|improve this answer

the syntax becomes

  void keyboard( unsigned char key, int x, int y )
  {
      switch( key )
      {
          case  27:
          case 'q':
          case 'Q':
              exit( 0 );
              break;

         case 'a': ...

         case 'b': ...
      }
  }
share|improve this answer
void keyboard( unsigned char key, int x, int y )
{
    switch( key )
    {
        case 027:
        case 'q':
        case 'Q':
            exit( 0 );
            break;

        case 'a': ...

        case 'b': ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Careful - 027 and 27 aren't the same. The leading 0 in 027 is the prefix for an octal literal, so 027 != 27. –  templatetypedef Oct 3 '13 at 0:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.