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I am very new to programming in general, and while I'm sure this looks like homework, it likely is for somebody, but I'm teaching myself, so it's "self-homework"?

Anyway, I want to count the number of times a turtle leaves the window as it randomly makes squares. I also wanted to put a dot down at every point it exits the screen, but that's just for my own fun.

I know I am setting outs to 0 every time through, but I can't figure out how to create an accumulator pattern (if that's the right thing to do) within a function like this that already has to return a value.

Here's my code:

import random
import turtle

def isInScreen(w,t):

    leftBound = - w.window_width()/2
    rightBound = w.window_width()/2
    topBound = w.window_height()/2
    bottomBound = -w.window_height()/2

    turtleX = t.xcor()
    turtleY = t.ycor()


    stillIn = True
    outs = 0

    if turtleX > rightBound or turtleX < leftBound:
        t.dot()
        t.right(180)
        t.forward(50)
        outs += 1
        print(outs)
        return outs

    if turtleY > topBound or turtleY < bottomBound:
        t.dot()
        t.right(180)
        t.forward(50)
        outs += 1
        print(outs)
        return outs

    if outs == 4:
        stillIn = False

    return stillIn

t = turtle.Turtle()
wn = turtle.Screen()

t.shape('turtle')
while isInScreen(wn,t):
    coin = random.randrange(0,2)
    if coin == 0:
        t.left(90)
    else:
        t.right(90)

    t.forward(50)

wn.exitonclick()

Any advice would be appreciated.

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4 Answers

The easiest way to do this would be to keep track of how many times your turtle has gone off screen outside of your function, but inside of your while loop.

Instead of having your function return whether the turtle has gone out four times, just have it return if it went out in that step. You'd have to change your function to look something like:

def isScreen(w, t):
    if turtleX > rightBound or turtleX < leftBound:
        return True
    if turtleY > topBound or turtleY < bottomBound:
        return True
    else:
        return False

Then you can keep track of how many times you've gone out in your while loop:

outs = 0
while outs < 4:
    if isScreen:
        outs += 1
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I'm sorry but I can't seem to get your answer to work properly. Either the drawing loop ends after 4, or it never ends. –  theSchap Jul 18 '12 at 0:32
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How about putting variables refering to a specific thing into a class?

class MyTurtle(object):

    def __init__(self):
        self.outs = 0

    def isInScreen(self, w, t):
        leftBound = - w.window_width()/2
        rightBound = w.window_width()/2
        topBound = w.window_height()/2
        bottomBound = -w.window_height()/2

        turtleX = t.xcor()
        turtleY = t.ycor()

        stillIn = True

        if turtleX > rightBound or turtleX < leftBound:
            t.dot()
            t.right(180)
            t.forward(50)
            self.outs += 1
            print(self.outs)
            return outs

        if turtleY > topBound or turtleY < bottomBound:
            t.dot()
            t.right(180)
            t.forward(50)
            self.outs += 1
            print(self.outs)
            return outs

        if self.outs == 4:
            stillIn = False

        # for some reason i think this line was missing
        return stillIn
        # or this 
        return outs


t = turtle.Turtle()
wn = turtle.Screen()

myThing = MyTurtle()
t.shape('turtle')

# now you know WHAT is located "in screen"
# and you could now have lots of turtlely
# things running off the screen too with a
# little modification where each "myturtle"
# keeps track of its own "outs"

while myThing.isInScreen(wn, t):
    coin = random.randrange(0,2)
    if coin == 0:
        t.left(90)
    else:
        t.right(90)
    t.forward(50)
wn.exitonclick()
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And its only three more lines of code but way more expandable –  DevPlayer Jul 17 '12 at 20:44
    
Thanks! I got this working, and I've just started using classes so I found it fun to utilize them. The only problem is that I had to change: if outs == 4: to if self.outs == 4: for it to be defined. –  theSchap Jul 18 '12 at 0:33
    
outs == 4 updated to self.outs == 4 ; upticks are good. –  DevPlayer Jul 18 '12 at 1:04
    
:) Thanks again. Now I'm working on having 2 turtles, and ending if they collide. This should be interesting. –  theSchap Jul 18 '12 at 1:25
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You can return a list object, which has the 'stillIn' value as well as the accumulator's value.

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One way is to just make outs a global variable (not recommended):

outs = 0
def isInScreen(w,t):
    ...

A slightly better way to encapsulate outs is to make it an attribute of the function itself. This way, it acts kind of like a global variable.

def isInScreen(w,t):

    leftBound = - w.window_width()/2
    rightBound = w.window_width()/2
    topBound = w.window_height()/2
    bottomBound = -w.window_height()/2

    turtleX = t.xcor()
    turtleY = t.ycor()


    stillIn = True

    if turtleX > rightBound or turtleX < leftBound:
        t.dot()
        t.right(180)
        t.forward(50)
        isInScreen.outs += 1
        print(isInScreen.outs)
        return isInScreen.outs

     # rest of the function

isInScreen.outs = 0

Basically, you replace outs with isInScreen.outs throughout the body of the function, then initialize it after the function is defined. (Unfortunately, you can't initialize the value inside the function, or it gets reset each time you call it.)

Note that this is not a common idiom. Most of the time, you would have a class with outs as an attribute, and isInScreen a method which updates the attribute.

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1  
"not a common idiom" should probably be replaced with "bound to confuse a reader". As PEP20 notes: "If the implementation is hard to explain, it's a bad idea." and using function namespaces from the outside is even hard to explain to the interpreter (which is why the "Unfortunately" caveat is needed). –  msw Jul 17 '12 at 19:59
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