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I have a type class Shape that declares a number of functions common to all shapes. One of these functions (refine) needs to return a list of subshapes. To express this constraint, I use existential quantification:

data Shapeable = forall a . Shape a => Shapeable a

and have the function return [Shapeable]. I have an additional constraint that some shapes can be refined (via a refine function) while others can check for intersection (via an intersect function). These are mutually exclusive in that a shape that can refine itself cannot check for intersection and vice versa.

If I were not using the quantification, I would have just created two more typeclasses: Intersectable and Refineable. Is there a way to express disjoint function sets within a single typeclass like system?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I believe the closest you can get is by having two existential cases:

data Shapeable =
    forall a . (Shape a, Intersectable a) => Intersectable a |
    forall a . (Shape a, Refineable a) => Refineable a
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I suggest something like this:

data Shape
    = Composite
        { refine :: [Shape]
        , {- other type-class methods go here -}
        }
    | Primitive
        { intersect :: Shape -> Region
        , {- other type-class methods go here -}
        }

...and skip the typeclass and existential quantification entirely.

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I recommand not using a type class at all. Define your operations as a simple data type:

data ShapeOps a =
    ShapeOps {
      intersect :: Maybe (a -> a),
      refine    :: Maybe (a -> a)
    }

Then you can use existential quantification:

data Shape =
    forall a. Shape (ShapeOps a) a

This concept is much easier to factor:

data Shape =
    forall a.
    Shape {
      intersect :: Maybe (a -> a),
      refine    :: Maybe (a -> a),
      shape     :: a
    }

Using Maybe is only an example. You could also use RankNTypes instead of existential quantification:

newShape ::
    (forall a. (a -> a) -> a -> b) ->
    (forall a. (a -> a) -> a -> b) ->
    ShapeConfig ->
    b

This function could pass the shape to the first continuation, if it has intersection and to the second, if it has refinement. You could think of all kinds of ways to combine. Using Monoid or Alternative you can even do both:

newShape ::
    (Alternative f) =>
    (forall a. (a -> a) -> a -> f b) ->
    (forall a. (a -> a) -> a -> f b) ->
    ShapeConfig ->
    f b

Using RankNTypes has the advantage that you could write more flexible functions. Instead of a simple constructor function you could now have a fold, a map or anything you want.

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