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I need to take all the digits in a hex number and "invert" them: all zeroes become non-zeroes (F) and all non-zeroes become zeroes.

I tried:

void someFunction(DWORD hexVal)
{
     //...
     hexVal = ~hexVal;
     //...
}

and this changed 0xE0000000 to 0x1FFFFFFF instead of 0x0FFFFFFF.

How can I produce the desired result?

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1  
0xE0000000 is not 0x00000000? –  TheZ Jul 17 '12 at 19:31
    
You want [1, E] to become 0? –  jli Jul 17 '12 at 19:31
    
@TheZ I know, the program that called the function passed 0xE0000000 –  aggieband2015 Jul 17 '12 at 19:32
    
@jli non-zero doesn't have to be F after inverting, it can be any non-zero value. Anything other than zero needs to become zero –  aggieband2015 Jul 17 '12 at 19:33
    
0xE0000000 = 1110 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 ~0xE0000000 = 0001 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 = 0x1FFFFFFF –  Hans Z Jul 17 '12 at 19:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This should give you the desired result for 2 bytes. You get the idea for 4 bytes.

hexval = ((hexval & 0xf000) ? 0 : 0xf000) |
         ((hexval & 0xf00) ? 0 : 0xf00) |
         ((hexval & 0xf0) ? 0 : 0xf0) |
         ((hexval & 0xf) ? 0 : 0xf);
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ah yeah, thanks, perfect –  aggieband2015 Jul 17 '12 at 19:46
    
about 1.2 seconds for 100 million iterations. Han Z' solution is slightly faster. –  Wug Jul 17 '12 at 20:55
1  
@Wug that's cause bitmath and bitshift > branching ;) –  Hans Z Jul 17 '12 at 21:07
    
Is this 1.2 seconds an average over several runs (since other programs running can effect it)? I am not worried about using 1.2 * 10^-8 per iteration (on your platform/OS/depending what else is running). You program is probably could improve performance elsewhere. –  Ed Heal Jul 17 '12 at 21:15

Assuming you really meant that you want zero->non-zero and vice-versa, on a digit-by-digit basis:

DWORD invertDigits(DWORD in) {
    return (
        ((in & (0xF << 28)) ? 0x0 : (0xF << 28)) |
        ((in & (0xF << 24)) ? 0x0 : (0xF << 24)) |
        ((in & (0xF << 20)) ? 0x0 : (0xF << 20)) |
        ((in & (0xF << 16)) ? 0x0 : (0xF << 16)) |
        ((in & (0xF << 12)) ? 0x0 : (0xF << 12)) |
        ((in & (0xF << 8)) ? 0x0 : (0xF << 8)) |
        ((in & (0xF << 4)) ? 0x0 : (0xF << 4)) |
        ((in & (0xF << 0)) ? 0x0 : (0xF << 0))
    );
}
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1  
You're not shifting by enough. BIT SHIFTS. :D –  Wug Jul 17 '12 at 20:46
    
oops, fixed thanks. –  Ned Batchelder Jul 17 '12 at 21:29

That is the desired result for the bitwise NOT operation. 0xE0000000 + 0x1FFFFFFF = 0xFFFFFFFF

The absolute fastest way to do what you want would be to split it into bytes and use a lookup table.

This solution takes the processor equivalent of about: 24 adds, 4 multiplies, and 4 memory lookups. The multiplies are part of the array indexing. All simple mathematical operations run at about the same speed, except multiplies and memory lookups which are slightly longer. Your mileage may vary depending on your processor architecture and the compiler optimizations performed.

unsigned int transform1(unsigned int value)
{
    // static const unsigned char ZZ = 0x0, ZF = 0xF, FZ = 0xF0, FF = 0xFF; // for C++

    #define ZZ (unsigned char) 0x00
    #define FZ (unsigned char) 0xF0
    #define ZF (unsigned char) 0x0F
    #define FF (unsigned char) 0xFF

    static const unsigned char lookup[256] = 
    {
        FF, FZ, FZ, FZ, FZ, FZ, FZ, FZ, FZ, FZ, FZ, FZ, FZ, FZ, FZ, FZ,
        ZF, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ,
        ZF, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ,
        ZF, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ,
        ZF, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ,
        ZF, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ,
        ZF, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ,
        ZF, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ,
        ZF, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ,
        ZF, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ,
        ZF, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ,
        ZF, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ,
        ZF, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ,
        ZF, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ,
        ZF, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ,
        ZF, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ, ZZ,
    }; // array takes up 1KB of RAM

    unsigned int result = 0;

    result |= lookup[(unsigned int)((value & (FF << 0 )) >> 0) ] << 0;
    result |= lookup[(unsigned int)((value & (FF << 8 )) >> 8) ] << 8;
    result |= lookup[(unsigned int)((value & (FF << 16)) >> 16)] << 16;
    result |= lookup[(unsigned int)((value & (FF << 24)) >> 24)] << 24;
    return result;
}
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This isn't quite syntactically valid. sometimes. It depends on how const the compiler thinks const is. –  Wug Jul 17 '12 at 19:54
    
there, now it's C compliant. mostly. –  Wug Jul 17 '12 at 20:42
    
how fast does this run on your machine? –  Hans Z Jul 17 '12 at 21:08
    
No clue. I'm running windows atm, since linux and amd refuse to cooperate. However, on the web test thingy I did, it runs 100m iterations in about .55 seconds. There's a link to the test in the comments on the question, just clone it and play with the transform function. I was surprised, I thought your would be faster when I saw it. –  Wug Jul 17 '12 at 21:57
1  
Out of boredom, I tried a 16 bit lookup table, which works the fastest out of all of the solutions here, running for slightly less than .4 seconds for 100m rounds (3.97 seconds for a billion). I initialized the lookup table at runtime, which adds an additional one time performance hit. In case anyone's curious: ideone.com/64XFe –  Wug Jul 17 '12 at 23:17

You may have to go byte by byte, starting with the MSB. Check if the value is between 16^6 and 16^7 (assuming this is unsigned). If it is, add to the new number 0. If it's not, add to the new number 2^31+2^30+2^29+2^28.

See what I'm getting at?

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So inversion and negation are two different things.

Inversion takes each bit and produces its complement like so:

 0xE0000000 = 1110 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
~0xE0000000 = 0001 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 = 0x1FFFFFFF

If you want "Anything other than zero needs to become zero" you want boolean negation i.e.

hexVal = !hexVal;

EDIT: Okay, so I finally got what the asker was asking after reading some of the other answers, here's my personal version using one giant bit math expression

n = ~(n | ((n & 0x77777777) << 1) | ((n & 0x88888888) >> 3)
        | ((n & 0x33333333) << 2) | ((n & 0xCCCCCCCC) >> 2)
        | ((n & 0x11111111) << 3) | ((n & 0xEEEEEEEE) >> 1));
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That makes sense, thanks –  aggieband2015 Jul 17 '12 at 19:46
    
@aggie I updated my answer, let me know if this works. –  Hans Z Jul 17 '12 at 20:07
    
It seems to return the correct answer. I didn't exactly test it thoroughly though. Ran 100 million iterations in .8 seconds. –  Wug Jul 17 '12 at 20:54

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