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The C++ casts static_cast, const_cast, reinterpret_cast have a template-like syntax, e.g.

long foo = 3; 
int bar = static_cast<int>(foo);

I've looked in the Standard, and it says that casts are expressions, not template functions as I thought.

This left me wondering: under the hood, are these casts just templates with privileged status, or are they keywords that happen to borrow the template syntax?

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"under the hood, are these casts just templates with privileged status, or are they keywords that happen to borrow the template syntax?" The latter. –  ildjarn Jul 17 '12 at 19:37
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What does it matter? Either find a way to distinguish the two ways and test for yourself or don't touch compiler internals - they should and are opaque to you. –  Dani Jul 17 '12 at 19:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 14 down vote accepted

are they keywords that happen to borrow the template syntax?

This. Casts are implemented differently depending on the context they are used in – in general, they cannot be implemented as functions. For instance, static_cast is sometimes only a compile-time operation, no code is emitted for it. But other times (in particular when invoking constructors, casting in a type hierarchy or converting between layout-incompatible primitive types) it requires a runtime operation.

That said, you can implement your own functions that resemble the standard cast syntax (boost::lexical_cast does that).

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