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i just started learning assembly and making some custom loop for swapping two variables using C++ 's asm{} body with Digital-Mars compiler in C-Free 5.0

Enabled the -o (optimization)

And got the results:

 time of for-loop(cycles)        844
 time of while-loop(cycles)      735
 time of custom-loop-1(cycles)   562
 time of custom-loop-2(cycles)   469

i couldnt find Digital-Mars compiler "asm output" option to compare. There is no other optimisation options in the build options. Should i change my compiler? if yes, which one? Can you look at the codes below and tell me why custom loops are faster?

here is the standard for loop:

t1=clock(); 
for(int i=0;i<200000000;i++)
{
    temp=a;//instruction 1
    a=b;//instruction 2
    b=temp;//3 instructions total   
}   
t2=clock();
printf("\n time of for-loop(increasing) %i  \n",(t2-t1));

here is the standard while loop:

t1=clock();
while(j<200000000)
{
    temp=a;//again it is three instructions
    a=b;
    b=temp; 
            j++;
}
t2=clock();
printf("\n time of while-loop(cycles)  %i  \n",(t2-t1));

here is my custom loop 1:

t1=clock();
j=200000000;//setting the count
    __asm
    {
        pushf           //backup
        push eax        //backup
        push ebx        //backup
        push ecx        //backup
        push edx        //backup

        mov ecx,0       //init of loop range(0 to 200000000)
        mov edx,j

        do_it_again:    //begin to loop


        mov eax,a       //basic swap steps between cpu and mem(cache)
        mov ebx,b       
        mov b,eax       
        mov a,ebx       //four instructions total

        inc ecx         // j++
        cmp ecx,edx     //i<200000000  ?
        jb do_it_again  // end of loop block

        pop edx     //rolling back to history   
        pop ecx         
        pop ebx         
        pop eax         
        popf            
    }

t2=clock();
printf("\n time of custom-loop-1(cycles)   %i   \n",(t2-t1));

here is my second custom loop:

t1=clock();
j=200000000;//setting the count
    __asm
    {
        pushf           //backup
        push eax        
        push ebx        
        push ecx        
        push edx        

        mov ecx,0       //init of loop range(0 to 200000000)
        mov edx,j

        mov eax,a       //getting variables to registers
        mov ebx,b

        do_it_again2:   //begin to loop

        //swapping with using only 2 variables(only in cpu)
        sub eax,ebx         //a is now a-b
        add ebx,eax         //b is now a
        sub eax,ebx         //a is now -b
        xor eax,80000000h   //a is now b and four instructions total

        inc ecx         // j++
        cmp ecx,edx     //i<200000000  ?
        jb do_it_again2  // end of loop block

        pop edx         //rollback
        pop ecx         
        pop ebx         
        pop eax         
        popf            
    }

t2=clock();
printf("\n time of custom-loop-2(cycles)  %i   \n",(t2-t1));

full code:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<time.h>

int main()
{
int j=0;

int a=0,b=0,temp=0;

srand(time(0));
time_t t1=0;
time_t t2=0;


t1=clock(); 
for(int i=0;i<200000000;i++)
{
    temp=a;//instruction 1
    a=b;//instruction 2
    b=temp;//3 instructions total   
}   
t2=clock();
printf("\n time of for-loop(cycles) %i  \n",(t2-t1));


t1=clock();
while(j<200000000)
{
    temp=a;//again it is three instructions
    a=b;
    b=temp; 
    j++;
}
t2=clock();
printf("\n time of while-loop(cycles)  %i  \n",(t2-t1));


t1=clock();
j=200000000;//setting the count
    __asm
    {
        pushf           //backup
        push eax        //backup
        push ebx        //backup
        push ecx        //backup
        push edx        //backup

        mov ecx,0       //init of loop range(0 to 200000000)
        mov edx,j

        do_it_again:    //begin to loop


        mov eax,a       //basic swap steps between cpu and mem(cache)
        mov ebx,b       
        mov b,eax       
        mov a,ebx       //four instructions total

        inc ecx         // j++
        cmp ecx,edx     //i<200000000  ?
        jb do_it_again  // end of loop block

        pop edx     //rolling back to history   
        pop ecx         
        pop ebx         
        pop eax         
        popf            
    }

t2=clock();
printf("\n time of custom-loop-1(cycles)   %i   \n",(t2-t1));


t1=clock();
j=200000000;//setting the count
    __asm
    {
        pushf           //backup
        push eax        
        push ebx        
        push ecx        
        push edx        

        mov ecx,0       //init of loop range(0 to 200000000)
        mov edx,j

        mov eax,a       //getting variables to registers
        mov ebx,b

        do_it_again2:   //begin to loop

        //swapping with using only 2 variables(only in cpu)
        sub eax,ebx         //a is now a-b
        add ebx,eax         //b is now a
        sub eax,ebx         //a is now -b
        xor eax,80000000h   //a is now b and four instructions total

        inc ecx         // j++
        cmp ecx,edx     //i<200000000  ?
        jb do_it_again2  // end of loop block

        pop edx         //rollback
        pop ecx         
        pop ebx         
        pop eax         
        popf            
    }

t2=clock();
printf("\n time of custom-loop-2(cycles)  %i   \n",(t2-t1));

return 0;

}

i am just learning c++ and assembly and wondered how things going on. Thank you

windows xp, pentium 4 (2 GHz) Digital-Mars in C-Free

share|improve this question
    
Did you disassemble the code the compiler generated? That'd be at least a hint as to what it's spending its cycles on that your code isn't. –  cHao Jul 17 '12 at 19:57
    
Do you really build with optimizations on? I once did similar expirements with memcmp and expirienced that the compiled code was slightly faster besides calls etc.. Such questions are barely answereable and always specific for the concrete case. –  Paranaix Jul 17 '12 at 19:59
3  
BTW, in this case, the while and for loops could conceivably be optimized away, and replaced with j=200000000; temp=b;, since the variables involved aren't objects or volatile and the iteration count is constant. Not sure why it isn't, other than maybe there being too much code still out there that likes to busy-wait... –  cHao Jul 17 '12 at 20:08
1  
You might want to try passing -o+all to dmc to see if it makes a difference. The -cod option is supposed to generate an assembly file, but it appears to need the obj2asm tool which isn't in the free package as far as I can tell. You need to be careful with simple benchmarks - a good optimizer can eliminate the C loops altogether since there's no visible change in the variable states. For example, GCC gets rid of the loops entirely with -O2. –  Michael Burr Jul 17 '12 at 20:15
1  
@DanielKamilKozar: Why truncate a great quote. "We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil," Donald Knuth, Structured Programming with Goto Statements –  sfstewman Jul 18 '12 at 3:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's a bit hard to guess what your compiler may be doing without seeing the assembly language result it creates. With VC++ 10, I get the following results:

time of for-loop(cycles) 155

time of while-loop(cycles)  158

time of custom-loop-1(cycles)   369

time of custom-loop-2(cycles)  314

I didn't look at the output, but my immediate guess would be that the difference between the for and while loops is just noise. Both are obviously quite a bit faster than your hand-written assembly code though.

Edit: looking at the assembly code, I was right -- the code for the for and the while is identical. It looks like this:

        call    _clock
        mov     ecx, DWORD PTR _a$[ebp]
        cdq
        mov     ebx, edx
        mov     edx, DWORD PTR _b$[ebp]
        mov     edi, eax
        mov     esi, 200000000
$LL2@main:
; Line 28
        dec     esi
; Line 30
        mov     eax, ecx
; Line 31
        mov     ecx, edx
; Line 32
        mov     edx, eax
        jne     SHORT $LL2@main
        mov     DWORD PTR _b$[ebp], edx
        mov     DWORD PTR _a$[ebp], ecx
; Line 35
        call    _clock

While arguably less "clever" than your second loop, modern CPUs tend to do best with simple code. It also just has fewer instructions inside the loop (and doesn't reference memory inside the loop at all). Those aren't the sole measures of efficiency by any means, but with this simple of a loop, they're fairly indicative.

Edit 2:

Just for fun, I wrote a new version that adds the triple-XOR swap, as well as one using the CPU's xchg instruction (just because that's how I'd probably write it by hand if I didn't care much about speed, etc.) Though Intel/AMD generally recommend against the more complex instructions, it doesn't seem to cause a problem -- it seems to be coming out at least as fast as anything else:

 time of for-loop(cycles) 156

 time of while-loop(cycles)  160

 time swap between register and cache  284

 time to swap using add/sub:  308

 time to swap using xchg:  155

 time to swap using triple-xor  233

Source:

// Note: updated source -- it was just too ugly to live. Same results though.
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<time.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <iomanip>
#include <sstream>

namespace { 
    int a, b;
    const int loops = 200000000;
}

template <class swapper>
struct timer {
    timer(std::string const &label) { 
        clock_t t1 = clock();
        swapper()();
        clock_t t2 = clock();
        std::ostringstream buffer;
        buffer << "Time for swap using " << label;
        std::cout << std::left << std::setw(30) << buffer.str() << " = " << (t2-t1) << "\n";
    }
};

struct for_loop {
    void operator()() {
        int temp;
        for(int i=0;i<loops;i++) {
            temp=a;//instruction 1
            a=b;//instruction 2
            b=temp;//3 instructions total   
        }
    }
};

struct while_loop {
    void operator()() { 
        int j = 0;
        int temp;
        while(j<loops) {
            temp=a;//again it is three instructions
            a=b;
            b=temp; 
            j++;
        }
    }
};

struct reg_mem {
    void operator()() {
        int j=loops;//setting the count
        __asm {
            mov ecx,0       //init of loop range(0 to 200000000)
            mov edx,j
    do_it_again:    //begin to loop
            mov eax,a       //basic swap steps between cpu and mem(cache)
            mov ebx,b       
            mov b,eax       
            mov a,ebx       //four instructions total

            inc ecx         // j++
            cmp ecx,edx     //i<200000000  ?
            jb do_it_again  // end of loop block
        }
    }
};

struct add_sub {
    void operator()() { 
        int j=loops;//setting the count
        __asm {
            mov ecx,0       //init of loop range(0 to 200000000)
            mov edx,j

            mov eax,a       //getting variables to registers
            mov ebx,b

    do_it_again2:   //begin to loop

            //swapping with using only 2 variables(only in cpu)
            sub eax,ebx         //a is now a-b
            add ebx,eax         //b is now a
            sub eax,ebx         //a is now -b
            xor eax,80000000h   //a is now b and four instructions total

            inc ecx         // j++
            cmp ecx,edx     //i<200000000  ?
            jb do_it_again2  // end of loop block

            mov a, eax
            mov b, ebx
        }
    }
};

struct xchg {
    void operator()() {
        __asm {
            mov ecx, loops
            mov eax, a
            mov ebx, b
    do_it_again3:
            dec ecx
            xchg eax, ebx
            jne do_it_again3
            mov a, eax
            mov b, ebx
        }
    }
};

struct xor3 {
    void operator()() { 
        _asm { 
            mov ecx, loops
            mov eax, a
            mov edx, b
    do_swap4:
            xor eax, edx
            xor edx, eax
            xor eax, edx
            dec ecx
            jnz do_swap4

            mov a, eax
            mov b, edx
        }
    }
};

int main() {
    timer<for_loop>("for loop");
    timer<while_loop>("while loop");
    timer<reg_mem>("reg<->mem");
    timer<add_sub>("add/sub");
    timer<xchg>("xchg");
    timer<xor3>("triple xor");
    return 0;
}

Bottom line: at least for this trivial of a task, you're not going to beat a decent compiler by enough to care about (and probably not at all, except possibly in terms of minutely smaller code).

share|improve this answer
    
then i will switch to vc++ 10. what is its size? several gigabytes or some megabytes? –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 17 '12 at 20:12
1  
@tuğrulbüyükışık: offhand I don't remember it's size, but at least you can download it for free. –  Jerry Coffin Jul 17 '12 at 20:18
    
installing now thx –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 17 '12 at 20:20
    
vc++10 is 146 mb download but over 2 GB when extracts –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 17 '12 at 20:27

The code generated by that compiler is pretty horrible. After disassembling the object file with objconv, here's what I got in regards to the first for loop.

?_001:  cmp     dword [ebp-4H], 200000000               ; 0053 _ 81. 7D, FC, 0BEBC200
        jge     ?_002                                   ; 005A _ 7D, 17
        inc     dword [ebp-4H]                          ; 005C _ FF. 45, FC
        mov     eax, dword [ebp-18H]                    ; 005F _ 8B. 45, E8
        mov     dword [ebp-10H], eax                    ; 0062 _ 89. 45, F0
        mov     eax, dword [ebp-14H]                    ; 0065 _ 8B. 45, EC
        mov     dword [ebp-18H], eax                    ; 0068 _ 89. 45, E8
        mov     eax, dword [ebp-10H]                    ; 006B _ 8B. 45, F0
        mov     dword [ebp-14H], eax                    ; 006E _ 89. 45, EC
        jmp     ?_001                                   ; 0071 _ EB, E0

The issues should be clear to anybody who ever looked at some assembly.

  1. The loop is very tightly dependent on the value that is put in eax. This makes any out-of-order execution practically impossible due to dependencies created on that register by every next instruction.

  2. There are six general-purpose registers available (since ebp and esp aren't really general-purpose in most of the setups), but your compiler uses none of them, falling back to using the local stack. This is absolutely unacceptable when speed is the optimization goal. We can even see that the current loop index is stored at [ebp-4H], while it could've been easily stored in a register.

  3. The cmp instruction uses a memory and an immediate operand. This is the slowest possible mix of operands and should never be used when performance is at stake.

  4. And don't get me started on the code size. Half of those instructions are just unnecessary.

All in all, the first thing I'd do is ditch that compiler at the earliest possible chance. But then again, seeing that it offers "memory models" as one of its options, one can't really seem to have much hope.

share|improve this answer
    
is accessing to memory points which are not a multiple of 4, slower? –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 17 '12 at 20:32
3  
Yes, alignment can be an issue - but in this case, the problem lies in a crappy compiler which doesn't seem to know any other registers than the accumulator. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Jul 17 '12 at 20:34
    
i have pentium m of a laptop. how many registers can i have? ax bx cx dx ex fx? or ei bi ci di like? –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 17 '12 at 20:35
3  
Please read the Intel Basic Architecture Manual before running your compiler/assembler again. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Jul 17 '12 at 20:37

It's likely due the fact that the compiler fails to make it register-operands, working on indirect (address) operands instead.

Switch compilers <-- this is your best optimization.

Update I have gone through the trouble of translating the the same program gcc intel inline assembly: test.c. It clearly shows how the for-loop and and-while loop are vastly superior to the handwritten assembly.


That said, with Digital Mars, the following is faster:

__asm
{
    xor ecx,j     //init of loop range(200000000 to 0)

    mov eax,a     //getting variables to registers
    mov ebx,b

do_it_again3: //begin to loop

    //swapping with xor idiom
    xor eax,ebx
    xor ebx,eax         
    xor eax,ebx         

    mov a,eax
    mov b,ebx

    dec ecx           // j--
    jnz do_it_again3  // end of loop block
}

using

  • the XOR swap idiom
  • descending loop
  • implicit comparison flags (with dec ecx)

My benchmark with Digital Mars Compiler Version 8.42n results in:

time of for-loop(cycles) 572  
time of while-loop(cycles)  566  
time of custom-loop-1(cycles)   355   
time of custom-loop-2(cycles)  317   
time of custom-loop-3(cycles)  234   

Full listing:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<time.h>

int main()
{
    int j=0;

    int a=0,b=0,temp=0;

    srand(time(0));
    time_t t1=0;
    time_t t2=0;


    t1=clock();
    for(int i=0; i<200000000; i++)
    {
        temp=a;//instruction 1
        a=b;//instruction 2
        b=temp;//3 instructions total
    }
    t2=clock();
    printf("\n time of for-loop(cycles) %i  \n",(t2-t1));


    t1=clock();
    while(j<200000000)
    {
        temp=a;//again it is three instructions
        a=b;
        b=temp;
        j++;
    }
    t2=clock();
    printf("\n time of while-loop(cycles)  %i  \n",(t2-t1));


    t1=clock();
    j=200000000;//setting the count
    __asm
    {
        pushf           //backup
        push eax        //backup
        push ebx        //backup
        push ecx        //backup
        push edx        //backup

        mov ecx,0       //init of loop range(0 to 200000000)
        mov edx,j

        do_it_again:    //begin to loop


        mov eax,a       //basic swap steps between cpu and mem(cache)
        mov ebx,b
        mov b,eax
        mov a,ebx       //four instructions total

        inc ecx         // j++
        cmp ecx,edx     //i<200000000  ?
        jb do_it_again  // end of loop block

        pop edx     //rolling back to history
        pop ecx
        pop ebx
        pop eax
        popf
    }

    t2=clock();
    printf("\n time of custom-loop-1(cycles)   %i   \n",(t2-t1));

    t1=clock();
    j=200000000;//setting the count
    __asm
    {
        pushf           //backup
            push eax        
            push ebx        
            push ecx        
            push edx        

            mov ecx,0       //init of loop range(0 to 200000000)
            mov edx,j

            mov eax,a       //getting variables to registers
            mov ebx,b

            do_it_again2:   //begin to loop

            //swapping with using only 2 variables(only in cpu)
            sub eax,ebx         //a is now a-b
            add ebx,eax         //b is now a
            sub eax,ebx         //a is now -b
            xor eax,80000000h   //a is now b and four instructions total

            inc ecx         // j++
            cmp ecx,edx     //i<200000000  ?
            jb do_it_again2  // end of loop block

            pop edx         //rollback
            pop ecx         
            pop ebx         
            pop eax         
            popf            
    }

    t2=clock();
    printf("\n time of custom-loop-2(cycles)  %i   \n",(t2-t1));

    t1=clock();
    j=200000000;//setting the count
    __asm
    {
        xor ecx,j     //init of loop range(200000000 to 0)

        mov eax,a     //getting variables to registers
        mov ebx,b

    do_it_again3:   //begin to loop

        //swapping with using only 2 variables(only in cpu)
        xor eax,ebx
        xor ebx,eax         
        xor eax,ebx         

        mov a,eax
        mov b,ebx

        dec ecx         // j--
        jnz do_it_again3  // end of loop block
    }

    t2=clock();
    printf("\n time of custom-loop-3(cycles)  %i   \n",(t2-t1));

    return 0;

}
share|improve this answer
    
i liked this xor idiom of yours. thanks. i will use it –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 17 '12 at 20:18
    
yes triple xor is faster thank you –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 17 '12 at 20:23
    
is your cpu 3 ghz? –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 17 '12 at 20:26
    
Mine is a Q9550 @ 2.83GHz –  sehe Jul 17 '12 at 20:42
    
i did %7 error. not bad –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 17 '12 at 20:48

I'm surprised that any of you guys got anything but zero cycles from the C code. Here, with gcc 4.6.3 and -O2, the loop vanishes away as there is no side-effect from it. Everything except the asm block is removed. I would be surprised if Digital Mars can't do such a trivial optimization; I bet you can try different optimization switches that will remove the C code, at which point such trivial comparison becomes impossible.

Your toy example is useless to compare compiler optimizations with hand-crafted assembly. Statistically speaking, compilers can consistently write better machine code than humans.

share|improve this answer
    
Up-voted despite condescending tone, because this is a valid point. Have several times encountered this when toying with some benchmarking, GCC notices that code in fact has no side-effect and the fastest code is code not run. –  r_ahlskog Jul 24 '12 at 12:55

That's normal and changing the compiler wouldn't solve this "problem". Assembler is extremely low-level and you have control of everything. Your C++ compiler always does more than it needs. Calling a function would take more time than it would take in assembly, because the compiler protects the stack (for example). And in loop that's the same thing: Declare a new variable takes more time, add values also etc...

This question should be interesting for some more information: When is assembler faster than C?

share|improve this answer
    
A straight C++ -> assembly translation actually does do far more than it strictly needs to, but because of that fact, it's pretty much only done in debug builds. For release, optimizations are almost invariably turned on...and C++ compilers typically optimize very, very well. Results can vary, but assembly language is not inherently faster just because it's low-level -- even somewhat-decent-but-not-optimal assembly language will often be slower than C++ that's been fully optimized by a good compiler. –  cHao Jul 26 '12 at 15:25

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