Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I need a little help with the some code that I just received help with. Basically, this code is written in Java but I need it to be able to work in C as well. I have tested the code already and it works fine. It essentially talkes a binary sting and places it into a byte array with each place holding 8 characters (1's and 0's). I do know a few variables that will never change and have listed them below:

Byte.SIZE is always 8

sLen is always 64

len is always 8

I have included the java code and my attempt to make the conversion. However, my code consistantly has run time errors and other syntax problems. I was wondering if anyone could find my issue:

Java code

static byte[] fromBinary(String s) {
    int sLen = s.length(), len = sLen / Byte.SIZE;
    if (sLen % Byte.SIZE != 0) {
        len++;
    }
    byte[] toReturn = new byte[len];
    for (int i = 0; i < sLen; i++) {
        if (s.charAt(i) == '1') {
            toReturn[i / Byte.SIZE] = (byte) (toReturn[i / Byte.SIZE] | (0x80 >>> (i % Byte.SIZE)));
        }
    }

    return toReturn;
}

C code

char fromBinary [] (String s) {
    int sLen =64;
    int len=8;
    int i=0;
    char toReturn [8];
    char str [64]=s;

    for (i = 0; i < sLen; i++) {
        if (str[i] == '1') {
            toReturn[i/8] = (char)(toReturn[i/8] | (0x80 >>> (i%8)));
        }
    }

    return toReturn;
}

Ok sorry, so to begin I am relatively new to C. I have been programming in Java for a few years so I am not vey accustomed to the errors and syntax of C. I am using Dynamic C as the programming environment so error messages may be different. I used the following main to run my program:

void main()  {
char bytes [8];
string s ="1010110011011110010010000010001101000101011001111010101111001101";
bytes=fromBinary(s);
 for (j=0;j<8;j++){
    printf("%d",toReturn[j]);
    printf(", ");
    }
}

I have been unable to run my program due to the following errors:

line 1 : ERROR UNTITLED2.C : Only cofunctions can be indexed.
line 1 : ERROR UNTITLED2.C : Old style function declaration missing parameter declaration list. line 1 : ERROR UNTITLED2.C : ',' is missing/expected.
line 6 : ERROR UNTITLED2.C : Constant expression expected.
line 10 : ERROR UNTITLED2.C : Invalid expression.
line 10 : ERROR UNTITLED2.C : Missing character ';'.
line 10 : ERROR UNTITLED2.C : Missing character ';'.
line 10 : ERROR UNTITLED2.C : Missing character ')'.
line 10 : ERROR UNTITLED2.C : Missing character ')'.
line 10 : ERROR UNTITLED2.C : Invalid expression.
line 10 : WARNING UNTITLED2.C : Conversion to incompatible pointer type line 19 : WARNING UNTITLED2.C : Type mismatch: incompatible types char[] and unsigned int used in expression. 10 errors reached; further errors suppressed.

I am not sure what I am doing wrong. Any insight is appreciated. Sorry about all the confusion.

Newest update

unsigned char *fromBinary(const char * const s) {
static unsigned char toReturn[8]={0};
size_t i,j;
const size_t len=8;
 for(i=0;i<len;i++)        {
    for(j=0;j<8;j++)
       toReturn[i]|=(s[i*8+j]=='1' ? 1<<(7-j) : 0);
    }
return toReturn;
 }

 void main()  {
 unsigned char bytes [8];
 string s ="1010110011011110010010000010001101000101011001111010101111001101";
 fromBinary(s)
 for (j=0;j<8;j++){
    printf("%d",toReturn[j]);
     printf(", ");
    }
}

gave me the following errors:

line 1 : ERROR UNTITLED3.C : Keyword 'const' can only be used with globals and static locals. line 4 : ERROR UNTITLED3.C : Assignment to read-only variable not allowed. line 4 : ERROR UNTITLED3.C : Keyword 'const' can only be used with globals and static locals. line 7 : WARNING UNTITLED3.C : Conversion to incompatible pointer type line 7 : WARNING UNTITLED3.C : Conversion to incompatible pointer type line 7 : WARNING UNTITLED3.C : Conversion to incompatible pointer type line 15 : WARNING UNTITLED3.C : Type mismatch: incompatible types char[] and unsigned int used in expression. line 15 : ERROR UNTITLED3.C : Invalid expression - need lvalue.
line 15 : ERROR UNTITLED3.C : s is out of scope/ not declared.
line 15 : ERROR UNTITLED3.C : Missing character ';'.
line 15 : ERROR UNTITLED3.C : string is out of scope/ not declared. line 16 : WARNING UNTITLED3.C : Conversion to incompatible pointer type line 16 : WARNING UNTITLED3.C : Wrong type for parameter 1.
line 16 : ERROR UNTITLED3.C : s is out of scope/ not declared.
line 16 : ERROR UNTITLED3.C : DynamicC does not support array assignment. line 16 : ERROR UNTITLED3.C : Invalid expression - need lvalue.

share|improve this question
3  
Yes. So, what is your question again? – Satadru Biswas Jul 17 '12 at 20:14
    
Sorry, I edited my question; basically I dont know why my code is not working. – user1506919 Jul 17 '12 at 20:21
2  
Not working in what way? What part is not working? What errors? What have you done to try to debug things? Sorry, but this question is terribly deficient in the information necessary for us to be able to answer it and is liable to be closed soon unless fixed soon. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jul 17 '12 at 20:22
    
What exactly is this thing even doing? Also since when does c have a >>> operator? – Voo Jul 17 '12 at 20:25
    
@Voo: It doesn't. I think that that is interpreted a right shift and then a greater then according to precedence rules. – Linuxios Jul 17 '12 at 20:27
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just from the looks of it your C code is going to explode horribly (even if it were syntactically valid, which it is not). You're returning toReturn which is allocated on the stack so it goes out of scope the moment the function returns. This is almost certainly going to cause segmentation violations and the like. Instead of trying to translate Java, why not just write it in C from scratch.

unsigned char *fromBinary(const char * const s)
{
   static unsigned char toReturn[8]={0};
   size_t i,j;
   const size_t len=8;

   for(i=0;i<len;i++)
       {
       toReturn[i]=0;
       for(j=0;j<8;j++)
          toReturn[i]|=(s[i*8+j]=='1' ? 1<<(7-j) : 0);
       }
   return toReturn;
}

Note the array returned is a) unsigned (to avoid sign extension) and b) allocated as static so it won't go away outside the function.

UPDATE: this is a complete test harness for the above function:

#include <stdio.h>

unsigned char *fromBinary(const char * const s);

int main(void)
{
   const char *const s="0010100100110101001101101101111010110010000001011101001001001001";
   unsigned char *b;
   b=fromBinary(s);
   printf("%02X %02X %02X %02X %02X %02X %02X %02X\n",b[0],b[1],b[2],b[3],b[4],b[5],b[6],b[7]);
   return 0;
}

unsigned char *fromBinary(const char * const s)
{
(as above)
}

This compiles without errors or warnings using gcc. It returns 29 35 36 DE B2 05 D2 49. In your code you are a) not declaring any header files b) not prototyping fromBinary() c) not declaring or assigning toReturn in your main() function. You should also never declare main() with void return type. If you get errors with the above code then either you are not using a real C compiler or it is broken. I suggest reading or re-reading a basic book on the C programming language. Kelley and Pohl's 'A Book on C' is a good start.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer, however, I still got a few errors when I tried to run your code. I edited my original response to show what is going on – user1506919 Jul 17 '12 at 20:55

I fixed , try this:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef char* string;

unsigned char* fromBinary(const char * const s) {
    static unsigned char toReturn[8]={0};
    size_t i,j;
    const size_t len=8;
    for(i=0;i<len;i++){
        for(j=0;j<8;j++)
            toReturn[i]|=(s[i*8+j]=='1' ? 1<<(7-j) : 0);
    }
    return toReturn;
 }

int main()  {
    unsigned char (*bytes)[8];
    string s ="1010110011011110010010000010001101000101011001111010101111001101";
    int j;

    bytes=(unsigned char (*)[8])fromBinary(s);
    for (j=0;j<8;j++){
        //printf("%02X",(*bytes)[j]);
        printf("%d",(*bytes)[j]);
        printf(", ");
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.