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Would be someone please to explain the next:

In the "Programming Perl" book postfix autoincrement operator is described, as

when placed after, they ($a-- , $a++) increment or decrement the variable after returning the value.

So, as I understood, $a++ is never used in void context, cause there has been said that

they increment or decrement the variable

But in the next example value of the variable never changes:

my $a = 3;
$a = $a++;
say $a; #always outputs 3

So my assumption is that there is no reason to use post-autoincrement when value is assigned to the same variable, but then the definition from the "Programming Perl" should be considered wrong, cause operator does not affect variable, but value in variable (at least in that example). Is that right?

Appreciation in advance.

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You have the correct assumption that $a = $a++ is redundant because it will not increment the variable until it is accessed again. –  squiguy Jul 17 '12 at 20:42
2  
I would imagine that the pseudocode for the postfix autoincrement operator would be something like save old value of variable, increment variable, return old value. When you think of it that way, it's easy to see why your code doesn't change what's in a. –  Daniel Jul 17 '12 at 20:45
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2 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Why, both postfix autoincrement and autodecrement operators are actually quite often used in void context exactly because they affect the variable - not the value.

Your example works the way it works because variable gets post-incremented before its old value gets assigned to it. In other words, the order of

my $a = 3; $a = $a++; 

...is...

1) $old_value = $a;
2) $a = $a + 1;
3) $a = $old_value;

Should you replace $a = $a++ with $b = $a++ in your example, and print values of $b and $a afterwards, you'll clearly see the difference: while $a becomes incremented (thus, equal to 4), $b gets assigned the old value of $a (3).

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This pretty much nails it! –  simbabque Jul 17 '12 at 21:09
    
Sorry for my English but what does it mean "nails"? For me it seems true, except name $old_value, which I personally would like to change to "stack". Also my thanks to @simbabque –  user907860 Jul 17 '12 at 21:13
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@caligula: I meant to say that this is a very good explanation. translate.google.com: Це припечатав! –  simbabque Jul 17 '12 at 21:18
    
@simbabque Too bad I've already upvoted your answer: this translation alone deserves it... ))) –  raina77ow Jul 17 '12 at 21:22
1  
@caligula, "nails it", from "to nail it on the head", referring to a good hit of a hammer. It means the answer is exactly what was desired. Other expressions meaning the same thing include "hits the mark", "bullseye!" and "bingo!". –  ikegami Jul 17 '12 at 21:39
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So my assumption is that there is no reason to use post-autoincrement when value is assigned to the same variable, but then the definition from the "Programming Perl" should be considered wrong, cause operator does not affect variable, but value in variable. Is that right?

I think this is really about terminology.

There's $a++ and ++$a. They both affect the variable $a.

my $a = 3;
$a++;
say $a;

gives you 4, but so does

my $a = 3;
++$a;
say $a;

The difference is in what they return.

$a++ first returns the old value and then increments it. ++$a does the increment first and then returns the new value.

my $a = 3;
say $a++;
say $a;

Gives you:

3
4

While:

my $a = 3;
say ++$a;
say $a;

prints:

4
4

But then you would hardly assign the return value of $a++ to a variable. It's a lot more likely that you use it in another operation, where you first want the old value to be used and then the variable to be incremented.

Here are some very lame examples:

my $a = 3;
say $a while $a--;

Prints:

2
1
0

And:

my $a = 3;
say $a while --$a;

Prints:

2
1

Sometimes there are cases where you want the 0 or the 0th index of something. And sometimes you don't want it. Both is useful imho.

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Thanks for clearing that up @ikegami. –  simbabque Jul 18 '12 at 7:31
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