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I have a file which contains text and references to environment variables. Example:

#PRINTME It is always fun to start your week on a sunny ${DAY_OF_WEEK}
#PRINTME My name is ${USERNAME}, you killed my father - prepare to die!
Unrelated gibberish - not to be printed
...

Think of it as metadata.

I want to define a command that greps this file and prints everything marked with #PRINTME and evaluates the environment variables as well.

I did this: grep #HELP myfile | sed "s/#PRINTME //g" | awk '{print $1}' but my output was

It is always fun to start your week on a sunny ${DAY_OF_WEEK}
My name is ${USERNAME}, you killed my father - prepare to die!

Instead of

It is always fun to start your week on a sunny Monday
My name is Inigo Montoya, you killed my father - prepare to die!

Is there a SHELL way to do what I want? I'm using TCSH - can't change that. There are no issues with replacing grep, sed and awk.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do it with Gawk:

gawk '

  /^#PRINTME/ {

    # Remove prefix
    sub( /^#PRINTME /, "" )

    # Loop while the line contains variables
    while( /\$\{[^}]+\}/ ) {

      # Extract the first variable name
      VAR = gensub( /^[^$]*\$\{([^}]+)\}.*$/, "\\1", 1 )

      # Replace it with its value
      gsub( "\\$\\{" VAR "\\}", ENVIRON[ VAR ] )
    }

    print

 }
'

The script find the variables one by one and replace them by their value.

If you want the OS to evaluate the variables for you, it's even easier (and doable in standard Awk):

awk '/^#PRINTME/ { sub( /^#PRINTME /, "" ) ; system( "echo " $0 ) }'

This time, we build an echo command and pass it to a shell.

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Thank you, the last line is what I was looking for - i actually tried this already but it did not work - and now I tried it again and found the cause of my problem - the data in my lines contain special characters and so requires me to wrap it with double quotes. Once I do that this works exactly as I wanted. –  RonK Jul 18 '12 at 5:08

I'd use Perl, but it could be coded in any scripting language — Python, Ruby, Tcl/Tk, ...

It is just about a one-liner:

perl -n -e 'next unless m/^#PRINTME /;s/#PRINTME //;s/\$\{(\w+\)\}/$ENV{$1}/eg;print;'

The -n means read lines but don't print them automatically (think sed -n). The next skips the lines that are not to be printed. The first substitute removes the print marker. The pyrotechnics are in the second substitute:

  • Look for ${WORD}, then replace it with $ENV{WORD}, using the e option to evaluate the replacement as an expression (irregular, presumably, since it isn't a regular expression at this point; it is just an ordinary expression), and do so globally g.

Then print what's left.

(Code now tested.)

$ cat xx.sh
DAY_OF_WEEK=Tuesday USERNAME="Inigo Montoya" \
perl -n -e 'next unless m/^#PRINTME /; s/#PRINTME //; s/\$\{(\w+)\}/$ENV{$1}/eg; print;' <<EOF

#PRINTME It is always fun to start your week on a sunny ${DAY_OF_WEEK}
#PRINTME My name is ${USERNAME}, you killed my father - prepare to die!
Unrelated gibberish - not to be printed
...

EOF
$ sh xx.sh
It is always fun to start your week on a sunny Tuesday
My name is Inigo Montoya, you killed my father - prepare to die!
$
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Thanks, that solved the problem - but I didn't define my problem well. I would like to have the operating system evaluate the line for me - since it might contain commands as well. I'll need to rethink my strategy. –  RonK Jul 17 '12 at 21:28
    
How are you going to identify the commands? The chances are it can be done in some rather similar manner if you can identify the commands to be executed, but it would definitively not be a one-liner, even in Perl (unless you go for very long single lines just to make a point of it). –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 17 '12 at 21:30

You can use the ENVIRON array in awk. Try this, for example:

awk 'BEGIN {print ENVIRON["HOME"]}' </dev/null
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The OP misused the term "environment variables" so your answer doesn't apply to what was really wanted. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 17 '12 at 21:45
    
If this is still a good answer to the question as posted, then it deserves an upvote. Staven can't help it that the question was wrong. –  Graham Jul 18 '12 at 0:36

Do you want to handle expressions like ${foo:-bar}? You mention in a comment that you want to evaluate the line if it contains commands, so you probably just want to use eval. Note that there are substantial security risks involved if you have uncontrolled input. In sh, you can do:

sh$ < myfile sed -e '/#HELP/!d' -e 's/#PRINTME //g' |
 while read line; do eval echo "\"$line\""; done 

If you are truly forced to use tcsh, then try:

tcsh$ sh -c '< myfile sed -e "/#HELP/!d" -e "s/#PRINTME //g" |\
            while read line; do eval echo "\"$line\""; done'

(Your code filters out #HELP lines, although you don't mention it, and the output you post suggests that your awk '{print $1}' was really awk '{print $0}'. I've combined all of that into the single sed invocation. You could also do sed -n '/#HELP/s/#PRINTME //gp', and you should almost certainly consider anchoring the patterns with ^)

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