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I had to cleanup database ( few tables with given condition , where columns for conditions are always same ) e.g.

delete from table1 where date < given_date1 and id = given_id
delete from table2 where date < given_date2 and id = given_id

Where given_id and givendate relation varies on both table by table and id by id.

The actual delete condition is not always where date < givendate , I just wrote for example, so say one id has got 300 days of data, and other of 500 days of data, the where condition is allowed to delete oldes 10 days of data where 10 is a variable, based on user input, so at one iteration all nodes are processed with deleting oldest 10 days of data and thus query changes for each id, but the fact is that it would be on same sets of table

earlier that script was written in as sql script and doing its operation but was taking time, Now I have implemented a multithreaded java application where the new code looks like

for(i=0; i < idcount ; i++)
{
   //launch new thread and against that thread call
   delete(date,currentid);
}

function delete(date,id)
{
    delete from table1 where date < given_date and id = given_id
    delete from table2 where date < given_date and id = given_id

}

after implementing this I found deadlock on sql table, which was solved by indexing the tables, but still its not fast as it is supposed to be, If I have 500 threads they are all launched one after other, and obviously running on same sets of table. and sql is not actually executing in parallel on each table ?

When I monitor my java.exe and sqlserver.exe, its not busy at all ? I hope it is supposed to be.

Could anyone tell me what could be best approach to implement multithreaded delete on same sets of table, so that I can bump up the thread and do deletion in parallel and consume available resources

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2  
What do you mean by "not as fast as its supposed to be"? both java and sqlserver processes are probably waiting for IO. –  vainolo Jul 17 '12 at 21:27
    
+1 to @vainolo. Also, you have one disk device. Regardless of how many threads are pounding your SQL server, you are going to be bound by disk IO. The DELETE ... IN is the right solution here. –  Gray Jul 17 '12 at 21:36
    
I meant as when I run sql script to purge tables, and I have 4000 ids with say 20 tables, those 4000 ids with 20 tables are purged within 7 hours (there are more tables 20 is just for eg., but yes that finishes in 7 hours) , now when multithreaded java program runs, I expect this to finish within an hour or earlier ( as it has 500 threads), OR I am expecting wrong ? Sql server transaction log is off . –  NitinKumar.001 Jul 17 '12 at 21:41
    
Hi Gray, The actual delete condition is not always where date < givendate , I just wrote for example, so say one id has got 300 days of data, and other of 500 days of data, the where condition is allowed to delete oldes 10 days of data where 10 is a variable, based on user input, so at one iteration all nodes are processed with deleting oldest 10 days of data and thus query changes for each id, but the fact is that it would be on same sets of table. –  NitinKumar.001 Jul 17 '12 at 21:44
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If all the actions are delete on a given id the I would just do a delete on each table doing all the ids at once.

e.g.

delete from table1 where date < given_date and id in (given_id1, given_id2 ..... )

If there are lots of given_ids the first insert them into a temporary table then execute each delete by joining the table to have deletions with the temporary table

Also if trying to use multiple threads then the improvement is really only expected if you act on a table in a thread so there will not be contention in the database.

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Thanks for the tip, when I changed the architecture so that one thread goes to one table, I became faster so all different table are purged in parallel without contention. –  NitinKumar.001 Jul 24 '12 at 15:38
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Ignoring the problem you created...

Why not use the IN statement?

delete from table1 where date < given_date and id IN (id1, id2, id3, ...)

Update based on clarification: Based on the explanation in the comments, my guess is that you don't have good indexes and every delete statement is resulting in a table scan. Each table scan locks the table and thus the database can only process one statement at a time. Index the date and id columns along with any other column used in the where clause of your delete statement.

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The actual delete condition is not always where date < givendate , I just wrote for example, so say one id has got 300 days of data, and other of 500 days of data, the where condition is allowed to delete oldes 10 days of data where 10 is a variable, based on user input, so at one iteration all nodes are processed with deleting oldest 10 days of data and thus query changes for each id, but the fact is that it would be on same sets of table –  NitinKumar.001 Jul 17 '12 at 21:45
    
thanks for the update, but the indexing on required column is already done, so all columns which appear in where clause have been indexed, but still performance is not good while increasing threads. –  NitinKumar.001 Jul 18 '12 at 13:32
    
Unfortunately, it is down to your expectations versus reality. Without really knowing the magnitude of work you are doing, nobody could possibly asses whether or not the time it is taking is reasonable. My next best guess would be that there is significant overlap in the multitude of delete queries, causing some lock contention. If you are using SQL Server, you could try adding NOLOCK to see how fast the delete statements run without any locking. –  Tim Bender Jul 18 '12 at 17:17
    
Hi Tim, I believe same about lock contention, but just to point that NOLOCK is not available for delete, update, insert, as nolock and readuncommitted are allowed only for reading DB. –  NitinKumar.001 Jul 18 '12 at 19:00
    
Oh, yeah, you're right about that. –  Tim Bender Jul 18 '12 at 19:09
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In my personal experience, I make a class to manage my queries and the communication with the database. I use a thread pool to manage my threads and simply have the threads make calls to my static database manager. The manager should have a synchronized method in it that acquires a lock() on to the database connection. The threads will then be able to access the database and their actions won't conflict with each other.

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but this will be serial execution of queries. right? –  JProgrammer Jul 17 '12 at 21:27
    
I have implemented my code with threadpool and connectionpool, where 500 is the intial threadcount to build the pool, and so goes with connection pool, I agree table acquires lock before executing the delete query and that lock time has been reduced by indexing the table, but still personally I think its not doing as it is supposed to do with 500 threads. –  NitinKumar.001 Jul 17 '12 at 21:30
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If you dont care about making all command in one transaction unit so put the delete in its own transaction (small one).

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