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I am fairly new to C and have been learning from K&R's book The C Programming Language. After doing the exercises on Binary trees I wanted to make a header for binary trees for char*, long and double.

There is a function in the following code that has been giving me grief - it should fill an array of character pointers with the values stored in the tree in lexicographical order however it has a bug somewhere. Here's the code for the String Tree Header btree.h:

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <stdlib.h>
    #include <string.h>

    /************** TYPES **************/
    typedef struct ctree 
    {
        char *name;
        ctree *left;
        ctree *right;
    }; 
    /************** Globals **************/

    static int c_inc = 0;

    /************** Function Prototypes **************/

    ctree *add_to_c_tree  (ctree *cnode, char *name);
    void print_c_tree     (ctree  *cnode);
    ctree *c_tree_alloc   (void);
    void   c_tree_free    (ctree  *cnode);
    void  return_c_tree   (ctree  *cnode, char **array);

    /************** Function Definitions **************/

    /* add_to_c_tree() : Adds a new node to a *character binary tree */
    ctree *add_to_c_tree (ctree *cnode, char *name){

        /* If the node is null, allocate memory for it, 
         * copy the name and set the internal nodes to null*/
        if(cnode == NULL){
            cnode = c_tree_alloc();
            cnode->name = strdup(name); 
            cnode->left = cnode->right = NULL;
        }
        /* If initialised then add to the left node if it is lexographically
        * less that the node above it else add it to the right node */
        else{
            if(strcmp(name, cnode->name) < 0)
                cnode->left  = add_to_c_tree(cnode->left,name);
            else if(strcmp(name, cnode->name) > 0)
                cnode->right = add_to_c_tree(cnode->right,name);

        }

        return cnode;
    }
    /* print_c_tree() : Print out binary tree */
    void print_c_tree(ctree *cnode){
        if (cnode != NULL) { 
            print_c_tree(cnode->left); 
            printf("%s\n",cnode->name); 
            print_c_tree(cnode->right);
        }
    }
    /* return_c_tree() : return array of strings containing all values in binary tree */
    void  return_c_tree   (ctree *cnode, char **array){

        if (cnode != NULL) { 
            return_c_tree (cnode->left,array+c_inc);
            c_tree_free(cnode->left); 
            *(array+c_inc++) = strdup(cnode->name);
            // printf("arr+%d:%s\n", c_inc-1,*(array+(c_inc-1)));
            return_c_tree (cnode->right,array+c_inc); 
            c_tree_free(cnode->right);
        }
    }
    /* c_tree_alloc() : Allocates space for a tree node */
    ctree *c_tree_alloc(void){
        return (ctree *) malloc(sizeof(ctree));
    }
    /* c_tree_free() : Free's Memory */
    void c_tree_free  (ctree *cnode){
        free(cnode);
    }

Which I have been testing with bt.c:

    #include "btree.h"

    int main(void){

        ctree *node = NULL; char *arr[100];

        node = add_to_c_tree(node, "foo");
        node = add_to_c_tree(node, "yoo");
        node = add_to_c_tree(node, "doo");
        node = add_to_c_tree(node, "woo");
        node = add_to_c_tree(node, "aoo");
        node = add_to_c_tree(node, "boo");
        node = add_to_c_tree(node, "coo");

        print_c_tree(node);

        return_c_tree(node,arr);
        for (int i = 0; i < 7; ++i)
        {
            printf("%d:%s  ..\n",i, arr[i]);
        }
        return 0;
    }

The reason for this question is that I have been having issues with the return_c_tree() function, which is meant to mimic the behaviour of K&R's print_c_tree() function except instead of recursively calling itself until a NULL ptr and printing out the name of the nodes in lexicographical order it is meant to add their names to an array of character ptrs and free the nodes memory.

However the output I get when run as above is:

    aoo
    boo
    coo
    doo
    foo
    woo
    yoo
    0:aoo  ..
    1:(null)  ..
    2:boo  ..
    3:doo  ..
    4:foo  ..
    5:coo  ..
    6:(null)  ..

Which shows that the print function works fine but the return function obviously isn't. The confusing thing is that if the call to printf() in return_c_tree() is uncommented this is the result:

    aoo
    boo
    coo
    doo
    foo
    woo
    yoo
    arr+0:aoo
    arr+1:boo
    arr+2:coo
    arr+3:doo
    arr+4:foo
    arr+5:woo
    arr+6:yoo
    0:aoo  ..
    1:(null)  ..
    2:boo  ..
    3:doo  ..
    4:foo  ..
    5:coo  ..
    6:(null)  ..

Which implies that it actually does add the strings in the right order. Also I have tried it without the c_inc variable -> ie just incrementing array before passing it to the right node which the produces the same results from the printf in return_c_tree() but different from main:

    arr+-1:aoo
    arr+-1:boo
    arr+-1:coo
    arr+-1:doo
    arr+-1:foo
    arr+-1:woo
    arr+-1:yoo
    0:foo  ..
    1:yoo  ..
    2:coo  ..
    3:(null)  ..
    4:(null)  ..
    5:(null)  ..
    6:(null)  ..

I'm rather confused, so If anyone can help I would appreciate it greatly. I'm sure I'm just incrementing it in the wrong place but I can't work out where.

I thought I had finally understood pointers but apparently not.

Best P

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your problem is how you handle your pointer to array when you recursively call. This will fix your return_c_tree function:

void  return_c_tree   (ctree *cnode, char **array)
{

  if (cnode != NULL) { 
    return_c_tree (cnode->left,array); // <--- CHANGED 2ND PARAM
    c_tree_free(cnode->left); 
    *(array+c_inc++) = strdup(cnode->name);
    return_c_tree (cnode->right,array); // <--- AGAIN, CHANGED 2ND PARAM
    c_tree_free(cnode->right);
  }
}

You're using a global variable c_inc to keep track of the current index into the array. However, when you recursively called return_c_tree, you passed in array+c_inc, but you did not offset c_inc to account for this. Basically, you double-counted c_inc each time.

While this solves your particular problem, there are some other problems with your code.

  1. In general, using global variables is asking for trouble. There's no need to do it here. Pass c_inc as a parameter to return_c_tree.

  2. Also, mixing global variables with recursion is especially prone to problems. You really want recursive routines to keep their state on the stack.

  3. As a commenter pointed out, all of your code in btree.h should really be in btree.c. The point of header files is to define an interface, not for code.

  4. (This is more stylistic) Your return_c_tree function is really two distinct functions: copy the elements of the tree (in order) into the array, and free the memory used by the tree. These two operations are conceptually distinct: there are times that you'll want to do one and not both. There can be compelling performance (or other) reasons to mix the two, but wait until you have some hard evidence.

share|improve this answer
    
This answer gets a +1 for the first three points it enumerates. –  ArjunShankar Jul 17 '12 at 22:50
    
Thanks alot, you've helped my understanding. Although I am slightly confused about the fourth point -> as I understand it this is encapsulation no? –  schQ Jul 17 '12 at 22:59
1  
@Chanq: It's more stylistic than the other three. I'll edit this to make it more clear. I find that functions are easier to reason about, refactor, and debug when they do one thing and do it well. Your return_c_tree is doing two things: (a) it copies all the names into an array, and (b) it deletes the binary tree. They're conceptually distinct: there are times When you would want to do one, but not the other. I'll violate this if there's a compelling reason to do so (say, performance), but only when I've collected real data to make that case (for example, profiled the code). –  sfstewman Jul 17 '12 at 23:11
2  
@Chanq Note that "return" is passive and so it's surprising to see it freeing its argument. It's also too generic to be informative. Better might be convert_tree_to_array. You could also have convert_tree_to_array_and_free, which could simply call convert_tree_to_array and free_tree, but could also be rewritten to do them both recursively if efficiency were desperately needed. The most important thing is to be precise about the semantics of your functions and document what they do (see Doxygen for getting serious about this). –  Jim Balter Jul 18 '12 at 2:50
1  
@JimBalter Wow I had never heard of Doxygen, I realise that semantics are inherently important in making code understandable and reusable. I'd like to thank you all once again, I have learned a huge amount from this discussion, Its not often that you post an question on here with the intent of learning something and retrieve such concise and helpful answers. –  schQ Jul 18 '12 at 10:05

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