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How can I find unused functions in a PHP project?

Are there features or API's built into PHP that will allow me to analyse my codebase - for example Reflection, token_get_all()?

Are these API's feature rich enough for me not to have to rely on a third party tool to perform this type of analysis?

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1  
Try out the PHP Test Coverage Tool. –  Greg Hurlman Aug 14 '08 at 19:11
    
Xdebug can also provide code coverage. You could use it in combination with the auto_prepend_file and auto_append_file ini directives to log code coverage of your application during general use. –  Dave Marshall Aug 14 '08 at 20:17
    
xdebug can tell you that with code coverage analysis xdebug.org/docs/code_coverage –  Mchl Jan 25 '11 at 9:42
1  
I find that a simple file search can often do already - as long as you're not using variable function names and the like. –  Pekka 웃 Jan 25 '11 at 9:43
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8 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Thanks Greg and Dave for the feedback. Wasn't quite what I was looking for, but I decided to put a bit of time into researching it and came up with this quick and dirty solution:

<?php
    $functions = array();
    $path = "/path/to/my/php/project";
    define_dir($path, $functions);
    reference_dir($path, $functions);
    echo
    	"<table>" .
    		"<tr>" .
    			"<th>Name</th>" .
    			"<th>Defined</th>" .
    			"<th>Referenced</th>" .
    		"</tr>";
    foreach ($functions as $name => $value) {
    	echo
    		"<tr>" . 
    			"<td>" . htmlentities($name) . "</td>" .
    			"<td>" . (isset($value[0]) ? count($value[0]) : "-") . "</td>" .
    			"<td>" . (isset($value[1]) ? count($value[1]) : "-") . "</td>" .
    		"</tr>";
    }
    echo "</table>";
    function define_dir($path, &$functions) {
    	if ($dir = opendir($path)) {
    		while (($file = readdir($dir)) !== false) {
    			if (substr($file, 0, 1) == ".") continue;
    			if (is_dir($path . "/" . $file)) {
    				define_dir($path . "/" . $file, $functions);
    			} else {
    				if (substr($file, - 4, 4) != ".php") continue;
    				define_file($path . "/" . $file, $functions);
    			}
    		}
    	}		
    }
    function define_file($path, &$functions) {
    	$tokens = token_get_all(file_get_contents($path));
    	for ($i = 0; $i < count($tokens); $i++) {
    		$token = $tokens[$i];
    		if (is_array($token)) {
    			if ($token[0] != T_FUNCTION) continue;
    			$i++;
    			$token = $tokens[$i];
    			if ($token[0] != T_WHITESPACE) die("T_WHITESPACE");
    			$i++;
    			$token = $tokens[$i];
    			if ($token[0] != T_STRING) die("T_STRING");
    			$functions[$token[1]][0][] = array($path, $token[2]);
    		}
    	}
    }
    function reference_dir($path, &$functions) {
    	if ($dir = opendir($path)) {
    		while (($file = readdir($dir)) !== false) {
    			if (substr($file, 0, 1) == ".") continue;
    			if (is_dir($path . "/" . $file)) {
    				reference_dir($path . "/" . $file, $functions);
    			} else {
    				if (substr($file, - 4, 4) != ".php") continue;
    				reference_file($path . "/" . $file, $functions);
    			}
    		}
    	}		
    }
    function reference_file($path, &$functions) {
    	$tokens = token_get_all(file_get_contents($path));
    	for ($i = 0; $i < count($tokens); $i++) {
    		$token = $tokens[$i];
    		if (is_array($token)) {
    			if ($token[0] != T_STRING) continue;
    			if ($tokens[$i + 1] != "(") continue;
    			$functions[$token[1]][1][] = array($path, $token[2]);
    		}
    	}
    }
?>

I'll probably spend some more time on it so I can quickly find the files and line numbers of the function definitions and references; this information is being gathered, just not displayed.

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This solution is good if you never use call_user_func() or call_user_func_array() or $var() –  calebbrown Nov 26 '08 at 7:17
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You can try Sebastian Bergmann's Dead Code Detector:

phpdcd is a Dead Code Detector (DCD) for PHP code. It scans a PHP project for all declared functions and methods and reports those as being "dead code" that are not called at least once.

Source: https://github.com/sebastianbergmann/phpdcd

Note that it's a static code analyzer, so it might give false positives for methods that only called dynamically, e.g. it cannot detect $foo = 'fn'; $foo();

You can install it via PEAR:

pear install phpunit/phpdcd-beta

After that you can use with the following options:

Usage: phpdcd [switches] <directory|file> ...

--recursive Report code as dead if it is only called by dead code.

--exclude <dir> Exclude <dir> from code analysis.
--suffixes <suffix> A comma-separated list of file suffixes to check.

--help Prints this usage information.
--version Prints the version and exits.

--verbose Print progress bar.

More tools:

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1  
+1: Didn't know this one –  Mchl Jan 25 '11 at 9:52
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This bit of bash scripting might help:

grep -rhio ^function\ .*\(  .|awk -F'[( ]'  '{print "echo -n " $2 " && grep -rin " $2 " .|grep -v function|wc -l"}'|bash|grep 0

This basically recursively greps the current directory for function definitions, passes the hits to awk, which forms a command to do the following:

  • print the function name
  • recursively grep for it again
  • piping that output to grep -v to filter out function definitions so as to retain calls to the function
  • pipes this output to wc -l which prints the line count

This command is then sent for execution to bash and the output is grepped for 0, which would indicate 0 calls to the function.

Note that this will not solve the problem calebbrown cites above, so there might be some false positives in the output.

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Because PHP functions/methods can be dynamically invoked, there is no programmatic way to know with certainty if a function will never be called.

The only certain way is through manual analysis.

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USAGE: find_unused_functions.php <root_directory>

NOTE: This is a ‘quick-n-dirty’ approach to the problem. This script only performs a lexical pass over the files, and does not respect situations where different modules define identically named functions or methods. If you use an IDE for your PHP development, it may offer a more comprehensive solution.

Requires PHP 5

To save you a copy and paste, a direct download, and any new versions, are available here.

#!/usr/bin/php -f

<?php

// ============================================================================
//
// find_unused_functions.php
//
// Find unused functions in a set of PHP files.
// version 1.3
//
// ============================================================================
//
// Copyright (c) 2011, Andrey Butov. All Rights Reserved.
// This script is provided as is, without warranty of any kind.
//
// http://www.andreybutov.com
//
// ============================================================================

// This may take a bit of memory...
ini_set('memory_limit', '2048M');

if ( !isset($argv[1]) ) 
{
    usage();
}

$root_dir = $argv[1];

if ( !is_dir($root_dir) || !is_readable($root_dir) )
{
    echo "ERROR: '$root_dir' is not a readable directory.\n";
    usage();
}

$files = php_files($root_dir);
$tokenized = array();

if ( count($files) == 0 )
{
    echo "No PHP files found.\n";
    exit;
}

$defined_functions = array();

foreach ( $files as $file )
{
    $tokens = tokenize($file);

    if ( $tokens )
    {
        // We retain the tokenized versions of each file,
        // because we'll be using the tokens later to search
        // for function 'uses', and we don't want to 
        // re-tokenize the same files again.

        $tokenized[$file] = $tokens;

        for ( $i = 0 ; $i < count($tokens) ; ++$i )
        {
            $current_token = $tokens[$i];
            $next_token = safe_arr($tokens, $i + 2, false);

            if ( is_array($current_token) && $next_token && is_array($next_token) )
            {
                if ( safe_arr($current_token, 0) == T_FUNCTION )
                {
                    // Find the 'function' token, then try to grab the 
                    // token that is the name of the function being defined.
                    // 
                    // For every defined function, retain the file and line
                    // location where that function is defined. Since different
                    // modules can define a functions with the same name,
                    // we retain multiple definition locations for each function name.

                    $function_name = safe_arr($next_token, 1, false);
                    $line = safe_arr($next_token, 2, false);

                    if ( $function_name && $line )
                    {
                        $function_name = trim($function_name);
                        if ( $function_name != "" )
                        {
                            $defined_functions[$function_name][] = array('file' => $file, 'line' => $line);
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

// We now have a collection of defined functions and
// their definition locations. Go through the tokens again, 
// and find 'uses' of the function names. 

foreach ( $tokenized as $file => $tokens )
{
    foreach ( $tokens as $token )
    {
        if ( is_array($token) && safe_arr($token, 0) == T_STRING )
        {
            $function_name = safe_arr($token, 1, false);
            $function_line = safe_arr($token, 2, false);;

            if ( $function_name && $function_line )
            {
                $locations_of_defined_function = safe_arr($defined_functions, $function_name, false);

                if ( $locations_of_defined_function )
                {
                    $found_function_definition = false;

                    foreach ( $locations_of_defined_function as $location_of_defined_function )
                    {
                        $function_defined_in_file = $location_of_defined_function['file'];
                        $function_defined_on_line = $location_of_defined_function['line'];

                        if ( $function_defined_in_file == $file && 
                             $function_defined_on_line == $function_line )
                        {
                            $found_function_definition = true;
                            break;
                        }
                    }

                    if ( !$found_function_definition )
                    {
                        // We found usage of the function name in a context
                        // that is not the definition of that function. 
                        // Consider the function as 'used'.

                        unset($defined_functions[$function_name]);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}


print_report($defined_functions);   
exit;


// ============================================================================

function php_files($path) 
{
    // Get a listing of all the .php files contained within the $path
    // directory and its subdirectories.

    $matches = array();
    $folders = array(rtrim($path, DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR));

    while( $folder = array_shift($folders) ) 
    {
        $matches = array_merge($matches, glob($folder.DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR."*.php", 0));
        $moreFolders = glob($folder.DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR.'*', GLOB_ONLYDIR);
        $folders = array_merge($folders, $moreFolders);
    }

    return $matches;
}

// ============================================================================

function safe_arr($arr, $i, $default = "")
{
    return isset($arr[$i]) ? $arr[$i] : $default;
}

// ============================================================================

function tokenize($file)
{
    $file_contents = file_get_contents($file);

    if ( !$file_contents )
    {
        return false;
    }

    $tokens = token_get_all($file_contents);
    return ($tokens && count($tokens) > 0) ? $tokens : false;
}

// ============================================================================

function usage()
{
    global $argv;
    $file = (isset($argv[0])) ? basename($argv[0]) : "find_unused_functions.php";
    die("USAGE: $file <root_directory>\n\n");
}

// ============================================================================

function print_report($unused_functions)
{
    if ( count($unused_functions) == 0 )
    {
        echo "No unused functions found.\n";
    }

    $count = 0;
    foreach ( $unused_functions as $function => $locations )
    {
        foreach ( $locations as $location )
        {
            echo "'$function' in {$location['file']} on line {$location['line']}\n";
            $count++;
        }
    }

    echo "=======================================\n";
    echo "Found $count unused function" . (($count == 1) ? '' : 's') . ".\n\n";
}

// ============================================================================

/* EOF */
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If I remember correctly you can use phpCallGraph to do that. It'll generate a nice graph (image) for you with all the methods involved. If a method is not connected to any other, that's a good sign that the method is orphaned.

Here's an example: classGallerySystem.png

The method getKeywordSetOfCategories() is orphaned.

Just by the way, you don't have to take an image -- phpCallGraph can also generate a text file, or a PHP array, etc..

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phpxref will identify where functions are called from which would facilitate the analysis - but there's still a crtain amount of manual effort involved.

C.

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afaik there is no way. To know which functions "are belonging to whom" you would need to execute the system (runtime late binding function lookup).

But Refactoring tools are based on static code analysis. I really like dynamic typed languages, but in my view they are difficult to scale. The lack of safe refactorings in large codebases and dynamic typed languages is a major drawback for maintainability and handling software evolution.

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