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I'm trying to start a data queue server under a managing process (so that it can later be turned into a service), and while the data queue server function works fine in the main process, it does not work in a process created using multiprocessing.Process.

The dataQueueServer and dataQueueClient code is based on the code from the multiprocessing module documentation here.

When run on its own, dataQueueServer works well. However, when run using a multiprocessing.Process's start() in mpquueue, it doesn't work (when tested with the client). I am using the dataQueueClient without changes to test both cases.

The code does reach the serve_forever in both cases, so I think the server is working, but something is blocking it from communicating back to the client in the mpqueue case.

I have placed the loop that runs the serve_forever() part under a thread, so that it can be stoppable.

Here is the code:

mpqueue # this is the "manager" process trying to spawn the server in a child process

import time
import multiprocessing
import threading
import dataQueueServer

class Printer():
    def __init__(self):
        self.lock = threading.Lock()
    def tsprint(self, text):
        with self.lock:
            print text

class QueueServer(multiprocessing.Process):
    def __init__(self, name = '', printer = None):
        multiprocessing.Process.__init__(self)
        self.name = name
        self.printer = printer
        self.ml = dataQueueServer.MainLoop(name = 'ml', printer = self.printer)

    def run(self):
        self.printer.tsprint(self.ml)
        self.ml.start()

    def stop(self):
        self.ml.stop()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    printer = Printer()
    qs = QueueServer(name = 'QueueServer', printer =  printer)
    printer.tsprint(qs)
    printer.tsprint('starting')
    qs.start()
    printer.tsprint('started.')
    printer.tsprint('Press Ctrl-C to quit')
    try:
        while True:
            time.sleep(60)
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        printer.tsprint('\nTrying to exit cleanly...')
        qs.stop()

    printer.tsprint('stopped')

dataQueueServer

import time
import threading

from multiprocessing.managers import BaseManager
from multiprocessing import Queue

HOST = ''
PORT = 50010
AUTHKEY = 'authkey'

## Define some helper functions for use by the main process loop
class Printer():
    def __init__(self):
        self.lock = threading.Lock()
    def tsprint(self, text):
        with self.lock:
            print text



class QueueManager(BaseManager): 
    pass


class MainLoop(threading.Thread):
    """A thread based loop manager, allowing termination signals to be sent
    to the thread"""
    def __init__(self, name = '', printer = None):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self._stopEvent = threading.Event()
        self.daemon = True
        self.name = name

        if printer is None:
            self.printer = Printer()
        else:
            self.printer = printer

        ## create the queue
        self.queue = Queue()
        ## Add a function to the handler to return the queue to clients
        self.QM = QueueManager

        self.QM.register('get_queue', callable=lambda:self.queue)
        self.queue_manager = self.QM(address=(HOST, PORT), authkey=AUTHKEY)
        self.queue_server = self.queue_manager.get_server()

    def __del__(self):
        self.printer.tsprint( 'closing...')


    def run(self):
        self.printer.tsprint( '{}: started serving'.format(self.name))
        self.queue_server.serve_forever()


    def stop(self):
        self.printer.tsprint ('{}: stopping'.format(self.name))
        self._stopEvent.set()

    def stopped(self):
        return self._stopEvent.isSet()

def start():
    printer = Printer() 
    ml = MainLoop(name = 'ml', printer = printer)
    ml.start()
    return ml

def stop(ml):
    ml.stop()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    ml = start()
    raw_input("\nhit return to stop")
    stop(ml)

And a client:

dataQueueClient

import datetime
from multiprocessing.managers import BaseManager


n = 0
N = 10**n

HOST = ''
PORT = 50010
AUTHKEY = 'authkey'


def now():
    return datetime.datetime.now()

def gen(n, func, *args, **kwargs):
    k = 0
    while k < n:
        yield func(*args, **kwargs)
        k += 1

class QueueManager(BaseManager): 
    pass
QueueManager.register('get_queue')
m = QueueManager(address=(HOST, PORT), authkey=AUTHKEY)
m.connect()
queue = m.get_queue()

def load(msg, q):
    return q.put(msg)

def get(q):
    return q.get()

lgen = gen(N, load, msg = 'hello', q = queue)
t0 = now()
while True:
    try:
        lgen.next()
    except StopIteration:
        break
t1 = now()
print 'loaded %d items in ' % N, t1-t0

t0 = now()
while queue.qsize() > 0:
    queue.get()
t1 = now()
print 'got %d items in ' % N, t1-t0
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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

So it seems like the solution is simple enough: Don't use serve_forever(), and use manager.start() instead.

According to Eli Bendersky, the BaseManager (and it's extended version SyncManager) already spawns the server in a new process (and looking at the multiprocessing.managers code confirms this). The problem I have been experiencing stems from the form used in the example, in which the server is started under the main process.

I still don't understand why the current example doesn't work when run under a child process, but that's no longer an issue.

Here's the working (and much simplified from OP) code to manage multiple queue servers:

Server:

from multiprocessing import Queue
from multiprocessing.managers import SyncManager

HOST = ''
PORT0 = 5011
PORT1 = 5012
PORT2 = 5013
AUTHKEY = 'authkey'

name0 = 'qm0'
name1 = 'qm1'
name2 = 'qm2'

description = 'Queue Server'

def CreateQueueServer(HOST, PORT, AUTHKEY, name = None, description = None):
    name = name
    description = description
    q = Queue()

    class QueueManager(SyncManager):
        pass


    QueueManager.register('get_queue', callable = lambda: q)
    QueueManager.register('get_name', callable = name)
    QueueManager.register('get_description', callable = description)
    manager = QueueManager(address = (HOST, PORT), authkey = AUTHKEY)
    manager.start() # This actually starts the server

    return manager

# Start three queue servers
qm0 = CreateQueueServer(HOST, PORT0, AUTHKEY, name0, description)
qm1 = CreateQueueServer(HOST, PORT1, AUTHKEY, name1, description)
qm2 = CreateQueueServer(HOST, PORT2, AUTHKEY, name2, description)

raw_input("return to end")

Client:

from multiprocessing.managers import SyncManager

HOST = ''
PORT0 = 5011
PORT1 = 5012
PORT2 = 5013
AUTHKEY = 'authkey'

def QueueServerClient(HOST, PORT, AUTHKEY):
    class QueueManager(SyncManager):
        pass
    QueueManager.register('get_queue')
    QueueManager.register('get_name')
    QueueManager.register('get_description')
    manager = QueueManager(address = (HOST, PORT), authkey = AUTHKEY)
    manager.connect() # This starts the connected client
    return manager

# create three connected managers
qc0 = QueueServerClient(HOST, PORT0, AUTHKEY)
qc1 = QueueServerClient(HOST, PORT1, AUTHKEY)
qc2 = QueueServerClient(HOST, PORT2, AUTHKEY)
# Get the queue objects from the clients
q0 = qc0.get_queue()
q1 = qc1.get_queue()
q2 = qc2.get_queue()
# put stuff in the queues
q0.put('some stuff')
q1.put('other stuff')
q2.put({1:123, 2:'abc'})
# check their sizes
print 'q0 size', q0.qsize()
print 'q1 size', q1.qsize()
print 'q2 size', q2.qsize()

# pull some stuff and print it
print q0.get()
print q1.get()
print q2.get()

Adding an additional server to share a dictionary with the information of the running queue servers so that consumers can easily tell what's available where is easy enough using that model. One thing to note, though, is that the shared dictionary requires slightly different syntax than a normal dictionary: dictionary[0] = something will not work. You need to use dictionary.update([(key, value), (otherkey, othervalue)]) and dictionary.get(key) syntax, which propagates across to all other clients connected to this dictionary..

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