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Today I was solving a problem on topcoder in which I have to sort countries by medals in Olympics. I have an STL container vector<pair<vector<int>, string> > v; The vector<int> contains no of gold, silver and bronze won by a country. I have to sort the structure in this particular order gold, silver, bronze and country(alphabetic order).

I used sort(v.begin(), v.end()) but this sorting only by the first value in the pair ie by gold, silver and bronze and its not ordering countries by alphabetic order when g,s,b medals of two countries are same.

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1  
What you're describing doesn't sound right. sort(v.begin(), v.end()) will sort by v.first[0], then v.first[1], then v.first[2], then v.second, which is exactly what you want. Please give us the actual code (for a minimal example), with test data. –  abarnert Jul 18 '12 at 1:00
1  
After reading your comments, your actual problem is not at all what you describe. The sort is not "sorting only by the first value", it's sorting by exactly the algorithm you specified. You didn't specify whether you wanted the numeric comparisons to be ascending or descending, and they're ascending, which is apparently not what you wanted. But that's the only thing it's doing "wrong". The fact that you didn't provide any code, any sample data, etc. made this much harder to figure out than it should have been, since most of us are not mind readers. –  abarnert Jul 18 '12 at 18:29
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have to provide your comparison functional object.

typedef pair<vector<int>, string> Country;
struct CmpCountry {
    bool operator()(const Country& lhs, const Country& rhs)
    {
        if(lhs.first[0] != rhs.first[0])
            return lhs.first[0] > rhs.first[0];
        if(lhs.first[1] != rhs.first[1])
            return lhs.first[1] > rhs.first[1];
        if(lhs.first[2] != rhs.first[2])
            return lhs.first[2] > rhs.first[2];
        return lhs.second < rhs.second;
    }
};

// then, call sort as following
std::sort(v.begin(), v.end(), CmpCountry());
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1  
This is wrong. The default comparison is defined for pair as lexicographical comparison (meaning it'll compare the vector first, then the string), and again defined as lexicographical comparison for vector, meaning ultimately it'll do exactly the same thing you've attempted to do, but without the typos where you use index 0 in place of 1 or 2. –  abarnert Jul 18 '12 at 0:57
    
Also, this won't compile, because CmpCountry() can't be used as a comparator, because there's no operator(); you called it operator< instead. –  abarnert Jul 18 '12 at 1:02
    
I've fixed some typo. –  timrau Jul 18 '12 at 3:30
1  
OK, it now works, but it's still not very good. There's no reason to break out the vector sort explicitly, since all you want to do is lhs.first > rhs.first. And the fact that you had those typos where you used 0 in place or 1 or 2 and didn't notice the problem until I pointed it out is exactly why you don't want to write it that way. On much more minor notes, you generally want functors' operator() to be const, and it's generally better to do rhs.first < lhs.first instead of lhs.first > rhs.first, because then it works with types that don't define all of the comparisons. –  abarnert Jul 18 '12 at 18:32
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If you've actually written the code you described, it will do exactly what you want:

compare.cpp:

#include <vector>
#include <utility>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

typedef pair<vector<int>, string> Country;

int main(int, char*[]) {
  vector<Country> v;
  while (cin.good()) {
    string name;
    int g, s, b;
    cin >> name >> g >> s >> b;
    vector<int> c;
    c.push_back(g);
    c.push_back(s);
    c.push_back(b);
    v.push_back(make_pair(c, name));
  }
  sort(v.begin(), v.end());
  for (vector<Country>::const_iterator it = v.begin(); it != v.end(); ++it) {
    cout << it->second << " " << it->first[0]
     << " " << it->first[1] << " " << it->first[2] << "\n";
  }
  return 0;
}

compare.in:

US 3 2 1
CA 4 1 3
DE 1 3 5
FR 1 3 5
BE 1 3 5
RU 3 1 2

Now do this:

$ clang++ -o compare compare.cpp
$ ./compare < compare.in
BE 1 3 5
DE 1 3 5
FR 1 3 5
RU 3 1 2
US 3 2 1
CA 4 1 3

Notice that it's sorted (ascending order) by gold medals first (BE/DE/FR first, then RU/US, then CA), silver next (RU then US), bronze next (although this didn't come up with my inputs), then name (BE, then DE, then FR). Exactly what you asked for.

(Well, actually you asked for alphabetical order, and this is going to do numeric order for g, s, and b. Which is probably what you want (so, e.g., 2 gold medals is more than 11). If not, you'll have to write your own comparison functor that stringifies the ints before comparing them.)

So, why does this work? Well, if you look at the definition of std::pair, it compares in lexicographical order—that is, it compares lhs.first vs. rhs.first, and then moves on to lhs.second vs. rhs.second only if the firsts were equal. And if you look at the definition of std::vector, it also compares in lexicographical order—that is, it compares lhs[0] vs. rhs[0], then moves on to lhs[1] vs. rhs[1] only if the [0]s were equal, and so on. And that's exactly the comparison order you're after here.

From your comments, it sounds like you want to reverse the normal sort order for the numeric values, but not the country names. To do that, you have to define your own comparator. But note that the problem is not that pair and vector don't sort the way you want—they do—but that int doesn't sort the way you want.

Since this is all incredibly trivial if you understand it, instead of just giving the answer, I'll explain it step by step.

First, here's what the default sort is (in effect, not literally) going to do:

struct CountryComparator {
  bool operator()(const Country& lhs, const Country& rhs) const {
    if (!(lhs.first == rhs.first))
      return (lhs.first < rhs.first);
    return (lhs.second < rhs.second);
  }
};

(Note that I'm going out of my way to only use == and <. This doesn't matter in your case, because you're just comparing ints, but STL is designed around the idea that every algorithm should work even on classes that only support these two operators, and it's a good habit to get into.)

Expanding the vector comparisons makes things pretty verbose, so let's not bother. If you actually wanted to reverse the sort order of some members of the vector but not others, you'd have to do this, but you're trying to reverse the sort order of the entire vector, which is identical to just reversing the sort order of the vector itself. So, just define this:

struct CountryComparator {
  bool operator()(const Country& lhs, const Country& rhs) const {
    if (!(lhs.first == rhs.first))
      return (rhs.first < lhs.first);
    return (lhs.second < rhs.second);
  }
};

Now, just change the sort line to:

  sort(v.begin(), v.end(), CountryComparator());

Now let's try it:

$ ./compare < compare.in
CA 4 1 3
US 3 2 1
RU 3 1 2
BE 1 3 5
DE 1 3 5
FR 1 3 5

CA with 4 golds is ahead of everyone else. Then US and RU, with 3 golds each, are sorted by silvers; US, with 2 silvers, comes first. Then BE, DE, and FR, with 1 gold each, and the same number of silvers, and the same number of bronzes, are sorted alphabetically.

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@abamert I want to order medals in opposite order like CA 4 1 3 at first and if there is a tie the countries are named by alphabetical order. But your answer is not doing that. The country with most medals is appearing last. –  mousey Jul 18 '12 at 1:35
    
mousey: It does exactly what you asked for—it treats the fields in exactly the order you wanted, and sorts them in an appropriate way. What you're now complaining about is that you wanted them in descending order, not ascending. (Presumably you still want the countries in ascending alphabetical order, however, rather than backward?) I'll add to the answer to explain that. –  abarnert Jul 18 '12 at 18:07
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You need a custom comparator so that the STL sort can compare your vectors. The easiest way to do this is by defining your vector as struct, and then adding a comparator.

struct country {
    vector<int> medals;
    string country_name;
}

struct compare { 
    bool operator()(country const &a, country const &b) { 
        for(int i = 0; i <  3; i++){ // 3 medals, right?
            if(a.medals[i] != b.medals[i]) 
                return a.medals[i] < b.medals[i];
        //else both countries have same number of medals
        return a.country_name < b.country_name;
    }
};
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What exactly is pair<vector<int>> supposed to mean? Also, how does declaring it as a struct rather than, e.g., a typedef (as in timrau's earlier answer) make it easier to define the comparison function? Also, do you really want to create a global-namespace struct called "compare" just for this special case? –  abarnert Jul 18 '12 at 0:51
1  
strcmp works with char*, you can compare std::strings straight with operator<. –  Alexander Malakhov Jul 18 '12 at 1:25
    
This still doesn't compile. And if it did, it would be exactly equivalent to the default comparator the OP started with (given that medals.size() is guaranteed to be 3), so it's hard to see what this is supposed to fix. –  abarnert Jul 18 '12 at 18:36
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