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The below code works fine on firefox and IE9, but having issue updating the markers on IE8. i get "SCRIPT16389: Unspecified error. main.js, line 20 character 313" and the markers once crated are not updating with the new set of data

my newdata.json format is

 {
    "points": [
        {
            "lat": "-28.0000",
            "long": "133.1500",
            "id": 0
        },
        {
            "lat": "-28.4710",
            "long": "153.3443",
            "id": 1
        }
    ]
}

and below is the script to get the json and use clustering to display the points

var map=null;
var markersArray = [];
var markerCluster= null;
google.load('maps', '3', {
        other_params: 'sensor=true'
});
google.setOnLoadCallback(initialize);

function initialize() {
    var mapcentre = new google.maps.LatLng(-29,135);
    var mapOptions = {
        zoom: 5,
        center: mapcentre,
        mapTypeId: google.maps.MapTypeId.ROADMAP
    };
    map = new google.maps.Map(document.getElementById('map'), mapOptions);
    startTimer();
}

function startTimer(){
    setInterval(function() {
        deleteOverlays();//should delete any existing point and clear the cluster
        addMarker();
    },3000);
}

function addMarker() {
        $.ajax({
            type: "GET",
            url: "newdata.json",
            async: false,
            dataType: "json",
            success: function(data){
                for (var i = 0, dataPoint; dataPoint = data.points[i]; i++) {
                    var latLng = new google.maps.LatLng(dataPoint.lat,dataPoint.long);
                    var marker = new google.maps.Marker({
                            position: latLng
                    });
                    markersArray.push(marker);
                }           

                markerCluster = new MarkerClusterer(map, markersArray);
            } 


        });
}


// Deletes all markers in the array by removing references to them
function deleteOverlays() {
  if (markersArray.length > 0) {
    for (i in markersArray) {
      markersArray[i].setMap(null);
    }
    markersArray.length = 0;
  }
  if(markerCluster!= null) {
       markerCluster.clearMarkers();
  }
}

on IE8 the maps loads fine and the intial data is displaying fine, but the new data is not updated so i guess something wrong with deleteOverlays ?

the above example is based on http://google-maps-utility-library-v3.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/markerclusterer/examples/advanced_example.html?compiled

share|improve this question

Well one thing that is very wrong is that for/in loops are intended for objects and not arrays. I've always hated IE but more and more often nowadays it seems to be the one that breaks when I wish everybody else would. It might be breaking on that. What tends to happen in these fancy new J-I-T young whippersnapper browsers is that they will hit all the keys but also all the array properties which is idiotic, IMO. This is a typing light and much more efficient way to loop through an array (keep in mind it goes backwards):

var i = markersArray.length
while(i--){
    markersArray[i].setMap(null);
}

If it's not this, check on the HTML. If you have busted up HTML the other browsers might be smart enough to figure out how to piece it together (again, too smart IMO) whereas IE8 will kick the bucket like a canary at ground zero of the manhattan project.

And no, really, stop using for/in on arrays. Even when it works it can be a complete mess.

share|improve this answer
    
Considering the whole point of for...in is to iterate through object properties, and "arrays" are just objects with numberish properties, i'd hardly call it idiotic. What's idiotic, IMO, is this unwarranted assumption that there's some magic thing it does with arrays that it doesn't do with every other object in the language. – cHao Jul 18 '12 at 4:03
    
Yes, but array properties shouldn't be exposed to it any more than I should be able to access an array element with someArray.0 (illegal label anyway, not that any of the browsers care most likely) - Allowing that creates ambiguity. Array indexes are ordered. Regular object properties are not. They are different animals that follow different rules, and should be treated as such. If the spec's not clear on that, it should be. We're getting generalized iterators soon enough but it's more useful than inconvenient to have a separation of properties and array keys, IMO. – Erik Reppen Jul 18 '12 at 14:10
    
Correction, I meant array elements, not properties. As far as it being useful, how much handier is it to be able to add meta-data properties to an array and then for in loop it with a hasOwn check and being able to assume the keyed array elements aren't going to get hit? Imagine a really, really big array. – Erik Reppen Jul 18 '12 at 14:31
    
Handier or not, that's not how the language works. someObject.property and someObject['property'] are equivalent; the specialness of the bracket syntax is that you can access properties whose names are not valid identifiers, or are not known at compile time. And no, if you'll check your JS specs, array elements are not special -- they're just object properties, and as such, have no specified order. The only indication of order is the property names, and those are only useful if you access them via a for loop with an index or something. – cHao Jul 18 '12 at 14:54
    
Arrays at least have a mechanism in the object for ordering those properties or we couldn't do the things with them that we do like sort, for instance. I may be misremembering but I could have sworn that indexed array properties used to get skipped in older browsers and that's the way I at least imagined I liked it. At the very least, it's bad to for/in over an array on the principle of work avoidance (hitting unnecessary properties). On the more extreme bugs side of it, you could hit some property of the array with like-named properties or a cleverly defined enumerable getter or setter. – Erik Reppen Jul 18 '12 at 16:14
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Adding cache:false, triggered IE8 to always get the latest json and updated the markers as intended.

 function addMarker() {
    $.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: "newdata.json",
        async: false,
        cache: false,
        dataType: "json",
        success: function(data){
            for (var i = 0, dataPoint; dataPoint = data.points[i]; i++) {
                var latLng = new google.maps.LatLng(dataPoint.lat,dataPoint.long);
                var marker = new google.maps.Marker({
                        position: latLng
                });
                markersArray.push(marker);
            }           

            markerCluster = new MarkerClusterer(map, markersArray);
        } 


    });

}

share|improve this answer

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