Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I completed the following code per the instructions for a homework assignment:

public enum AccountType {
    Checking {
        @Override
        String acctType() { return "Checking Account"; }
    },
    Savings {
        @Override
        String acctType() { return "Saving Account"; }
    },
    CreditCard {
        @Override
        String acctType() { return "Credit Card Account"; }
    };

    abstract String acctType();
}

Initially, however, I tried to do: public abstract String acctType(); and received the following error on each of the overridden methods:

stringValue() in  cannot override stringValue() in AccountType; 
attempting to assign weaker access privileges; 
was public

So my question is what is going on with the public modifier on the abstract method? The enum itself is declared as a public class, so I don't understand the bit about assigning weaker access privileges when both should seem to be public.

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The error message means that if you define the abstract method with a specific visibility, you have to define the implementations to have at least that visibility.

In this specific situation that means if the abstract method is public, the implementations have to be as well.

public enum AccountType {
    Checking {
        @Override
        public String acctType() { return "Checking Account"; }
    },
    Savings {
        @Override
        public String acctType() { return "Saving Account"; }
    },
    CreditCard {
        @Override
        public String acctType() { return "Credit Card Account"; }
    };

    public abstract String acctType();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is clearly tagged as a homework question - shouldn't you have provided a hint or at least an explanation rather than a full solution? –  Caspar Jul 18 '12 at 1:49
    
@Caspar To be clear, the code above was from a homework assignment that I completed already... I am just curious as to why I was experiencing that behavior. I marked it as homework, since it was part of an assignment, and it is not really code that is mission critical –  Hari Seldon Jul 18 '12 at 1:52
    
@DonRoby thanks for the edit and explanation. That clears it up a bit. I didn't think to declare the overridden methods as abstract. –  Hari Seldon Jul 18 '12 at 1:55
    
@HariSeldon it's not that I figured you were getting others to do your work for you, it's that I figured you probably wanted to know what was going on so you could fix it yourself. Don's edit has addressed that now anyway - good job Don. –  Caspar Jul 18 '12 at 1:57
    
@Caspar I think I sort of read it as the author intended by accident, i.e., I thought it was an already complete homework that he was looking to understand better. You're right that without that knowledge, hints would be better than full solution. Of course in this case, the full solution was simple and writing an explanation took a little more. I fully intended to explain in an edit. –  Don Roby Jul 18 '12 at 2:00
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.