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I want to set the value of IsParentRoot "0" if the input is "0" or execute some code if else:

    let isParentRoot parVal =
        match parVal with
        | "0" -> "0"
        | x -> (fun x -> 
            "something")

I'm trying this but this does not compile with the error "This function takes too many arguments, or is used in a context where a function is not expected". Any idea? Thanks

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3 Answers 3

Wouldn't you have to supply an argument to your function for that to compile?

Something like

let isParentRoot parVal =
  match parVal with
    | "0" -> "0"
    | x -> (fun y -> "something") x

because otherwise the last match would try returning a function that returns a string, while the first one would return a string. Mixing both isn't allowed.

But I think your approach may likely be wrong here. Functions return values (or unit). If you want to explicitly change something the general functional idiom is to return a new value where you changed what you wanted to change. Programming with side-effects (which your "set something to "0" if foo and do something entirely else if not" would be) is pretty much non-FP-like. But I'm still an F# beginner and just started two days ago to look into the language, so I might be mistaken here.

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In order to clarify the example, may be you can write x -> (fun y -> "something") x It removes ambiguity on the x variable –  sthiers Jul 20 '09 at 13:03
    
Or you could use |> to make it obvious that you're using the pattern-matched value in the following function: | x -> x |> (fun y -> "something") –  dahlbyk Jul 20 '09 at 13:36
    
Well, there is no ambiguity due to scoping, but I changed it as it might make things easier for others :) –  Joey Jul 20 '09 at 14:56

All possible return values of a function must be of the same type. So your case does not work since in one branch you are returning a String and in the other branch you are returning a function.

This would work:

let isParentRoot parVal =
        match parVal with
        | "0" -> (fun _ -> "0")
        | x   -> (fun _ ->  "something")

If you really want your case to work you could upcast both return values to Object.

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You don't need to define a lamba at this point, I believe you can just write:

let isParentRoot parVal =
    match parVal with
    | "0" -> "0"
    | x -> CODE BLOCK
           GOES HERE

i.e. to append x to a list and read the list out (just so there's meaningful code in here) you could just write:

let isParentRoot parVal =
    match parVal with
    | "0" -> "0"
    | x -> let roots = List.append oldroots x
           List.iter (fun r -> printfn "root: %s" r.ToString()) roots

Assuming you've previously defined your oldroots list that is.

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Wouldn't you still need to return a string for that to work? –  Joey Jul 20 '09 at 14:57
    
Yes, yes you would. doh! –  Massif Jul 21 '09 at 7:54

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