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I saw this command posted somewhere, :(){ :|:& };:

What would it do if I ran it in UNIX, I don't feel like trying myself in case it does something bad

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Good instincts! –  Beta Jul 18 '12 at 3:17

2 Answers 2

This is a fork bomb and it is very bad.

It will spawn many many processes, the number growing exponentially as each process spawns two more. They will clog your system until it falls over.

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Yep, it's the same as forkbomb(){ forkbomb|forkbomb & } ; forkbomb exception the function is called : instead of forkbomb. –  David Schwartz Jul 18 '12 at 3:17

Don't run it. Its fork bomb. it will bring down your system.

From wikipedia :

 /- Define the function ':' without any parameters '()' as follows:
 | /- Beginning of function-block.
 | | /- Load a copy of the function ':' into memory ...
 | | |/- ... and pipe its output to ...
 | | ||/- ... another copy of the ':'-function, which has to be loaded into memory.
 | | |||   (In other words, ':|:' loads two more copies of ':', thus causing a chain-reaction)
 | | |||/- Disown the functions (make them a background process), so that the children of a parent
 | | ||||  will not be killed when the parent gets auto-killed.
 | | |||| /- End of function-block.
 | | |||| |/- End of definition. 
/-\| |||| ||/- Execute the function ':'.  The chain-reaction begins.
:(){ :|:& };:

Here is the link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fork_bomb

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