Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Final Update: I really don't know how to explain it, but the problem isn't happening any more. If I figure out what changed to solve it, I'll post an answer.

I have a set of perl scripts which I use to execute large numbers of similar commands on a 16-core Fedora 17 machine. So far, each time I need to change the way the commands are generated I write a new script using one of the old ones as a template, and I haven't ever had problems with the code before (well, not since I wrote the original set of scripts, anyway). It is important to note that the old scripts still work without error, so I don't think that this is a system problem and I'm focusing mainly on where I (likely) messed up the code.

Here is a trimmed version of a working script:

use Forks::Super MAX_PROC => 24, ON_BUSY => 'block';
#...
foreach my $fi (@FILES){
    #...
    $runMe = 'java -Xmx2048m weka.classifiers.'. $class .' -t '. $TR .' -T '. $TE .' -c 1 > '. $OUT;
    fork { cmd =>  $runMe};
    #...
}
waitall;
print("\nDone!\n");

Here's a trimmed version of the broken script:

use Forks::Super MAX_PROC => 24, ON_BUSY => 'block';
#...
foreach my $n (@FI){
    if($n =~ m/^\d+$/){
            #...
        foreach my $f (@files){
            if($f =~ m/(\d+).arff/){
                print "starting interval $1 ... \n";
                #...
                $runMe = 'java -Xmx2048m weka.classifiers.'. $class .' -t '. $TR .' -T '. $TE .' -c 1 > '. $OUT;
                fork { cmd =>  $runMe );                
            }
        }
    }
}
waitall;
print("\nDone!\n");

This is the script's output (in part):

starting interval 12 ...
starting interval 3 ...
sh: fork: retry: No child processes
starting interval 30 ...
starting interval 6 ...
Use of uninitialized value $signal_pid in print at /usr/local/share/perl5/Forks/Super/Job.pm line 991, <DATA> line 261.
Use of uninitialized value $exec_pid in waitpid at /usr/local/share/perl5/Forks/Super/Job.pm line 918, <DATA> line 261.

The errors sh: fork: retry: No child processes, uninitialized value $signal_pid, and uninitialized value $exec_pid come up in the output at seemingly random points over and over, and more and more as the program is allowed to run longer.

Update: $ ulimit -a returns max user processes (-u) 1024 which is much more than the 24 I set for Forks::Super plus the 4 terminals I'm running on this remote machine. Given that the other script works fine and this one returns No child processes, I think I must not be cleaning up /waiting for all of the processes I create in the second script. I just can't figure out what's different about the call to waitall between the first and second script.

Update: Using the Forks::Super::Debug => 1 option, here is some representative output:

starting interval 30 ...
14694 23:24:05.735:  New job created: {pid=;state=NEW;cmd=java -Xmx2048m weka.classifiers.lazy.IBk -K 3 -t /foo/arff_files/$
14703 23:24:05.735:  Signal pid for 14703 is 14708
14694 23:24:05.736:  fork(): {pid=;state=NEW;style=cmd;cmd=[java -Xmx2048m weka.classifiers.lazy.IBk -K 3 -t /foo/arff_file$
14694 23:24:05.736:  _can_launch(): system not busy. launch ok.
14694 23:24:05.736:  fork: launch approved for job
14694 23:24:05.736:  Job will use /bar/.fhfork14694/.fh_007.signal to get signal pid.
14707 23:24:05.737:  Executing command [ java -Xmx2048m weka.classifiers.lazy.IBk -K 3 -t /home/share/data/arff_files/trainers_l1o_curv$
Use of uninitialized value $signal_pid in print at /usr/local/share/perl5/Forks/Super/Job.pm line 991, <DATA> line 261.
Use of uninitialized value $signal_pid in concatenation (.) or string at /usr/local/share/perl5/Forks/Super/Job.pm line 995, <DATA> lin$
14707 23:24:05.737:  Signal pid for 14707 is
Use of uninitialized value $exec_pid in waitpid at /usr/local/share/perl5/Forks/Super/Job.pm line 918, <DATA> line 261.
14707 23:24:05.737:  waitpid returned -1, exit code of 14707 was -1 72057594037927935
starting interval 6 ...
14694 23:24:05.739:  New job created: {pid=;state=NEW;cmd=java -Xmx2048m weka.classifiers.lazy.IBk -K 3 -t /foo/arff_files/$
14694 23:24:05.739:  fork(): {pid=;state=NEW;style=cmd;cmd=[java -Xmx2048m weka.classifiers.lazy.IBk -K 3 -t /foo/arff_file$
14694 23:24:05.739:  _can_launch(): system not busy. launch ok.
14694 23:24:05.740:  fork: launch approved for job
14694 23:24:05.740:  Job will use /bar/programs/.fhfork14694/.fh_008.signal to get signal pid.
14694 23:24:05.740:  launch(): CORE::fork() returned undefined!
current file is 2

I'm fairly certain the problem is that the processes aren't dieing/being cleaned up in time for the creation of new processes. ps -aux agrees that there are many children running, even though they do not show up on the first 50 lines of top both before and after I kill the parents. the waitall; call should prevent the script from exiting while it's children are alive and the MAX_PROC => 24 should prevent more than 24 children from being started at a time, so I'm not sure how it is happening that too many are running at any given moment.

If waitall was the cause of my troubles, then the problem would get worse when the script is called each successive time, which is what I see happening. But if this is the case, I shouldn't see what I do in top. When watching top, at first I see the 24 children running, and then after the end of the first run I see the number of chldren decrease until there are none, and then it executes again and there are another 24 children executing... this is the normal pattern i see with the other scripts. But later on, or if I kill the script (using pkill perl and pkill java to ensure that no processes relevant to the task are alive) and start it again, then I see a large number of error messages and small but sporadic numbers of children in top.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I'm just sharing what I found regarding this.

The working script contains only one loop and the broken one contains a nested loop, assuming it will have more processes than the working one.

sh: fork: retry: No child processes

No child processes is a system error that says it can't fork more. So at the time of execution, the code may fork more processes, which led to this error.

MAX_PROC => 24

You are only giving 24 processes to execute a time, and if it try to fork more than this 24, as per the ON_BUSY => 'block', it will wait and and will retry to create child until its successful. In the module documentation Forks::Super, it says it will fail if the system fork call fails. From the error you got its clear that the system fails to fork more. Just add a $count++ variable and find how many processes will be forked. Also please try Forks::Super::DEBUG, so that you may get more clues.

$ ulimit -a doesn't returns the max no of processes, actually its returning the maximum number of threads a user can run. Try ps aux so that you will get more clear picture of the processes now running.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks- I will look into these tomorrow and update. The nested loops do not mean more processes- it is all dependant on the number of files in any given directory. In this case, it's actually many fewer processes. Additionally, the other scripts run for days and fork tens of thousands of processes without issue, while there are only ~2,000 processes total to run with this new test setup. I think and hope that Forks::Super doesn't fork except when it's actually making a real worker process, otherwise it would fail any time it had to block for very long. –  kaz Jul 18 '12 at 7:24
    
That is to say, one of the reasons I use that module at all is because it claims to control the number of active processes and limit it to MAX_PROC, so if it doesn't do that then I should probably file a bug. –  kaz Jul 18 '12 at 7:26
    
But in the module documentation it says It will fail if the system fork call fails . Also try to execute the working code just after you execute the broken code. So if the server couldn't fork new child, in the working code also it has to show the error. –  Jithin Jul 18 '12 at 12:19
    
Yes, the system fork call is failing. And yes, if I run the script enough times the errors get so bad that I have to restart the machine because I can't even ls without errors. I think this must be because the processes I'm creating are not dieing/being cleaned up, and so they stick around for the next time the script is called (the script I posted is called with different parameters many times in a row). My problem, then, is with the waitall; command, which is apparently not functioning properly. Debugger results coming in a few hours. –  kaz Jul 18 '12 at 20:49
    
debug output edited into the question- I'm still not sure what the cause is. –  kaz Jul 18 '12 at 23:32

Since there was no answer supplied, I thought I'd chime in to this older thread since I just experienced this. My Fedora 20 box had been running fine for several weeks, left the office on Friday with no issue, came in this Monday morning and noticed that I couldn't unlock my xscreensaver session. Any key or mouse movement would just cause the screen to flash. Hitting Ctrl-Alt-F2 to get a text console, I logged in and got the same messages you listed. Each command I issued (first being sudo su -) gave me "bash: fork: retry: no child processes", then eventually the command would finish.

I was finally able to look at a process list, and nothing seemed out of the ordinary, because my ulimit settings were normal, but I was way under the limit on both maxuprc and open files. Memory usage was also fine. One thing I did notice was that my firefox process (and the firefox plugin-container process) both were consuming inordinate amounts of CPU, on the order of hundreds of hours just since last week. I killed both of those processes and then my system was fine, no issues at all after that.

I can't recall what tabs I had open, even if any would be considered problematic, but either way, those processes (or one of them at least) were definitely the cause.

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.