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I have approximately 40000 objects which might need to be repainted. Most of them are not on the screen, so it seems that I could save a lot of work by doing the checks concurrently. But, my CPU never goes above 15% usage, so it seems that it is still only using one core. Have I implemented the threads correctly? If so, why aren't all my cores being used? And is there a better way which does utilize all my cores?

public void paintComponent(Graphics g)
{
    super.paintComponent(g);

    if (game.movables.size() > 10000)
    {
        final int size = game.drawables.size();
        final Graphics gg = g;
        Thread[] threads = new Thread[8];
        for (int j = 0; j < 8; ++j)
        {
            final int n = j;
            threads[j] = new Thread(new Runnable()
            {
                public void run()
                {
                    Drawable drawMe;
                    int start = (size / 8) * n;
                    int end = (size / 8) * (n + 1);
                    if (n == 8) end = game.drawables.size(); // incase size
                                                             // % 8 != 0
                    for (int i = start; i < end; ++i)
                    {
                        drawMe = game.drawables.get(i);
                        if (drawMe.isOnScreen())
                        {
                            synchronized (gg)
                            {
                                drawMe.draw(gg);
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            });
            threads[j].start();
        }

        try
        {
            for (int j = 0; j < 8; ++j)
                threads[j].join();
        }
        catch (InterruptedException e)
        {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
    else
    {
        for (Drawable drawMe : game.drawables)
        {
            if (drawMe.isOnScreen())
            {
                drawMe.draw(g);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
Note, with all this synchronizing on gg, you're not really gaining much by adding threads. The drawing is often the expensive part -- meaning most of the time, threads will be waiting on gg to free up. –  cHao Jul 18 '12 at 4:13
1  
Your question title is slightly misleading. Why do you think only 2 "concurrent threads" are being used? Your implementation is fine. It's just that having many "Runnables" does not mean the runtime will use a physical OS thread per a Runnable instance. Neither does it mean all your cores will be utilised. –  Strelok Jul 18 '12 at 4:18
    
Add to that, i'm not sure Java likes it when multiple threads try to use the same Graphics (with or without synchronization). I know it's really anal about Swing components... –  cHao Jul 18 '12 at 4:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As has been pointed out, the synchronized (gg) is effectively serializing all the drawing, so you're probably going slower than single-threaded code due to thread creation and other overhead.

The main reason I'm writing however is that Swing, which this presumably is, is not thread safe. So the behavior of this program is not only likely to be bad, it's undefined.

Threading errors like this turn up as screwy behavior on some machines with some java runtime parameters and some graphics drivers. Been there. Done that. Not good.

JOGL will give you direct access to the GPU, the surest way to speed rendering.

share|improve this answer

To do this right, you might start by putting each drawMe in a (properly synchronized) list, then actually draw them in a loop after the joins are done. You can't speed the drawing (though if you've knocked out 99% of the drawMe's you've cut down the time needed dramatically), but if isOnScreen() is somewhat complicated, you'll get some real work out of your cores.

A ConcurrentLinkedQueue would save you the need to synchronize adds to the list.

The next step might be to use a blocking queue instead of a list, so the paint code could run in parallel with the visibility checks. With eight checks running, they should keep well ahead of the drawing. (But I think all the blocking queues either need synchronizing or do synching themselves. I'd skip this and stick with the CLQ and the first solution. Simpler and possibly faster.)

And (as Gene pointed out), everything Swing related starts on the EventQueue. Keep it there or life will get strange. Only your own code, not referencing the UI, should run in your threads.

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Since you're already not drawing any objects that are off-screen, you're probably gaining very very little by doing what you're doing above.

I would also go as far as to say you're making it worse, but introducing synchronize which is slow and also introducing threads that cause context switches, which are expensive.

To improve performace you should perhaps look into using different drawing libraries, such as the Java2D drawing library, which is part of the JDK: http://java.sun.com/products/java-media/2D/index.jsp

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I'm not sure how java will handle this, but other languages will blow up horribly and die if you reference something across scopes like you're doing with final int n (since it goes out of scope when the loop stops). Consider making it a field of the runnable object. Also, you're synchronizing on the graphics object while you're doing all of the real work. It's likely that you aren't getting any real performance increase from this. You might benefit from explicitly checking if the object is on the screen in parallel which is a read only operation, adding on-screen objects to a set or collection of some other sort, and then rendering sequentially.

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2  
There is nothing wrong with referencing n inside the thread as n is final and the instance of Runnable "closes" over any local variables. So for the duration the lifetime of the Runnable instance the value of n will always be the same for that Runnable. –  Strelok Jul 18 '12 at 4:15
    
That's scary indeed. –  Wug Jul 18 '12 at 4:16
    
Not that scary. Basically, Java makes a copy of the value and squirrels it away in the anonymous type that contains the closed function. It only happens with final variables, and the final keeps the value from changing in either place, so the two copies act like one (the big restriction being that you can't change them directly -- you can still tweak properties of an object, though). –  cHao Jul 18 '12 at 4:22
1  
@Wug that's not scary at all, and is actually a quite useful and widely used feature of any language that has it. It's the Java's version of closures. –  Strelok Jul 18 '12 at 4:24
    
Except that Java 7 allows true closures! –  Gene Jul 18 '12 at 4:37

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