Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am looking for the switch-case syntax in Mason, but haven't been able to find one.

Could someone please assist with a sample here?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Saket, the following works fine on my Mason system. It is HTML::Mason ver. 1.48 running on Perl 5.14 and Apache 2.2.22.

The switch-like statements given/when are available after Perl 5.10.1, (see here), as has been pointed out already in the other posting from Matteo.

test.html (rename to test.mas if your server configuration requires this).

<html>
  <head></head>
  <body>
% my $name = 'Wittig';
  <h3>Hello <% $name %>! Ist this your <% swordname($name) %>?</h3>
  </body>
</html>

<%perl>
 sub swordname  {
   my $hero = shift;
   my $sword;
   given($hero) {
      when (/^Luno/)      { $sword = 'Fingal'   }
      when (/^Ecke/)      { $sword = 'Eckesax'  }
      when (/^Artus/)     { $sword = 'Excalibur'}
      when (/^Wittig/)    { $sword = 'Mimung'   }
      when (/^Ortnit/)    { $sword = 'Rosen'    }
      when (/^Sigurd/)    { $sword = 'Gram'     }
      when (/^Siegmund/)  { $sword = 'Notung'   }
      when (/^Siegfried/) { $sword = 'Balmung'  }
      when (/^Dietrich/)  { $sword = 'Nagelring'}
      default:            { $sword = 'Sword'    }
   }
   return $sword;
 }
</%perl>

<%once>
 use feature "switch";
</%once>


The module Switch.pm which belonged to the Perl core modules before 5.14.0 (as David Cross noted in comment), did provide a more "switch-like" syntax but used a source filter. It can be still used after beeing installed by hand (cpan install Switch) but is not recommended. The example can be rewritten using Switch.pm:

<html>
  <head></head>
  <body>
% my $name = 'Wittig';
  <h3>Hello <% $name %>! Ist this your <% swordname($name) %>?</h3>
  </body>
</html>

<%perl>
 sub swordname  {
   my $hero = shift;
   switch($hero) {
      case 'Luno'      { return 'Fingal'   }
      case 'Ecke'      { return 'Eckesax'  }
      case 'Artus'     { return 'Excalibur'}
      case 'Wittig'    { return 'Mimung'   }
      case 'Ortnit'    { return 'Rosen'    }
      case 'Sigurd'    { return 'Gram'     }
      case 'Siegmund'  { return 'Notung'   }
      case 'Siegfried' { return 'Balmung'  }
      case 'Dietrich'  { return 'Nagelring'}
      else             { return 'Sword'    }
   }
 }
</%perl>

<%once>
 use Switch;
</%once>

But the most simple "equivalent" of a switch that depends only on a fixed key, would, of course, be a %hash:

<html>
  <head></head>
  <body>
% my $name = 'Wittig';
  <h3>Hello <% $name %>! Ist this your <% $NameSword{$name} %>?</h3>
  </body>
</html>

<%once>
 my %NameSword = (
   Luno      => 'Fingal',
   Ecke      => 'Eckesax',
   Artus     => 'Excalibur',
   Wittig    => 'Mimung',
   Ortnit    => 'Rosen',
   Sigurd    => 'Gram',
   Siegmund  => 'Notung',
   Siegfried => 'Balmung',
   Dietrich  => 'Nagelring'
 );
</%once>

All three variants produce the same output. Maybe I mixed up the sword names (will correct if necessary).

share|improve this answer
    
The given/when statement was introduced to replace Switch.pm. Switch.pm is a source filter and is therefore NOT recommended for production code. Switch.pm has been removed from the standard Perl distribution from Perl 5.14. You can still get it from CPAN, but the recommendation is that you don't do that. –  Dave Cross Jul 19 '12 at 9:00
    
@DaveCross, updated, Thanks! –  rubber boots Jul 19 '12 at 9:12

If you want to make a switch statement in Perl, put #switch $var at the beginning of the logic block. That is only to indicate you intend to do logic on only one variable. For the classic case of a break after every case, you can use if elsif else block.

$var = 3;

# switch $var
if   ($var == 1) {print "one\n";   }
elsif($var == 2) {print "two\n";   }
elsif($var == 3) {print "three\n"; }
elsif($var == 4) {print "four\n";  }
else             {print "didn't get it\n"; } #default

If you intend to use fall through and default, then it is more complicated and slower.

$var = 3;
$got = 0;
# switch $var
if   ($var == 1) {print "one\n";   ++$got;}
if   ($var == 2) {print "two\n";   ++$got;}
if   ($var == 3) {print "three\n"; ++$got;}
if   ($var == 3 
     || $var == 4) {print "three or four\n"; ++$got} #fall-through
unless ($got)      {print "didn't get it\n"; } #default
share|improve this answer

Perl did not have a switch/case statement until recently

You can use the Switch module

use Switch;

switch ($val) {
    case 1          { print "number 1" }
    case "a"        { print "string a" }
    case [1..10,42] { print "number in list" }
    case (\@array)  { print "number in list" }
    case /\w+/      { print "pattern" }
    case qr/\w+/    { print "pattern" }
    case (\%hash)   { print "entry in hash" }
    case (\&sub)    { print "arg to subroutine" }
    else            { print "previous case not true" }
}

or use the given/when constructs of Perl 6 available from Perl 5.10

Example:

use v5.10.1;

given ($var) {
    when (/^abc/) { $abc = 1 }
    when (/^def/) { $def = 1 }
    when (/^xyz/) { $xyz = 1 }
    default       { $nothing = 1 }
}
share|improve this answer
    
i believe that's with pure Perl code, and not mason. I tried using this in mason, but to no success. would you have a mason sample –  Saket Jul 18 '12 at 5:27
    
@Saket are you speaking about masonhq.com? –  Matteo Jul 18 '12 at 5:28
    
yes, that's what i'm talking about –  Saket Jul 18 '12 at 6:04
    
But then you can embed Perl code in HTML. You can have your switch statement in <%perl> sections. You should maybe edit your question and give an example of what you want to do. –  Matteo Jul 18 '12 at 6:25
1  
@Saket if you proveide the error message, and the context of the code that causes the error, we can help diagnose the mason error. I have a ton of mason code in front of me right now, and if your 'use' stanements aren't in the block that are specifically for perl code (init shared, perl, etc.) then yes, mason will puke on it when it reads it. I put mine in %init mostly, but I have one in a %filter block as well. –  Len Jaffe Jul 18 '12 at 18:51

On Perl 5.10.1 given/when works fine for me. Here is the example-component I used to test:

% my $value=2;
% given ($value) {
%     when (1) {
<h1>It is one, dear</h1>
%     }
%     when (2) {
<h2>Level two</h2>
%     }
% }
%
<%once>
use v5.10.1;
</%once>

If I set $value to 1, I get the h1-part; setting it to 2 gives me the h2-part.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.