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I used to work under Subversion/SVN and was instantly using nice feature called keyword substitution. Just putting in source files smth like:

/*
 *   $Author: ivanovpv $
 *   $Rev: 42 $
 *   $LastChangedDate: 2012-05-25 21:47:42 +0200 (Fri, 25 May 2012) $
 */

And each time Subversion was substituting keywords (Author, Rev, LastChangedDate) with actual ones.

Some time ago I was forced to move to Git and just wondering is there's something similar to Subversion's keyword substitution in Git?

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Just a side note, it's quite possible to get used to living without the substitutions. I've moved from svn to git more than a year ago, and I don't really miss this feature. In branch/merge workflow git allows you to do, having an integer revision number would be quite pointless. Also, git allows you to get all sorts of history/blame information from a local client very fast, so there's no need to 'cache' any of these by embedding them into the source files. –  che Jul 18 '12 at 7:41
    
@che I feel myself unhappy without that feature, sice I used to put revision # as my application version counter and automate it's deployment to production, so each time I could easily track version id for each production app –  barmaley Jul 18 '12 at 8:38
    
This is small part of revision history on application I'm working on: i.imgur.com/oCEVP.png -- I'm afraid there's no way to sanely number a generic acyclic graph in a distributed environment, so this is a feature you'll have to live without, and perhaps use commit hashes for such version tracking. The good news is that you'll find that git has features that make producing stable code much less painful than with svn. –  che Jul 18 '12 at 11:09
    
possible duplicate of Git equivalent of subversion's $URL$ keyword expansion –  guerda Mar 13 '13 at 12:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Solution

Well, you could easily implement such a feature yourself. Since I have an exam on awk, sed, python and shell scripting on monday, I decided to create such a script as an exercise.

Basically I embedded the commit command into a shell script. This script will first substitute the desired macros and then commit the changes. The project consists of two files:

Content?

keysub, a bash shell script and keysub.awk an awk script to replace keywords in a specific file. A third file is a config file which contains the values that should be substituted (besides variable stuff like commit count and timestamp).

How do you use it?

You call keysub instead of commit with the same options. The -m or -a option should come before any other commit option. A new option (that should always come first) is -f which takes a config file as a value. Example:

$ git add 'someJavaFile.java'
$ keysub -m 'fixed concurrent thread issue'
$ git push

or

$ git -f .myfile.cnf -m 'enhanced javadoc entries'

keysub

#!/bin/bash

# 0 -- functions/methods
#########################
# <Function description>
function get_timestamp () {
  date    # change this to get a custom timestamp
}

# 1 -- Variable declarations
#############################
# input file for mapping
file=".keysub.cnf"
timestamp=$(get_timestamp)


# 2 -- Argument parsing and flag checks
########################################

# Parsing flag-list
while getopts ":f:m:a" opt;
do
  case $opt in
    f) file=${OPTARG}
       ;;
    a) echo 'Warning, keyword substitution will be incomplete when invoked'
       echo 'with the -a flag. The commit message will not be substituted into'
       echo 'source files. Use -m "message" for full substitutions.'
       echo -e 'Would you like to continue [y/n]? \c'
       read answer
       [[ ${answer} =~ [Yy] ]] || exit 3
       unset answer
       type="commit_a"
       break
       ;;
    m) type="commit_m"
       commitmsg=${OPTARG}
       break
       ;;
   \?) break
       ;;
  esac
done
shift $(($OPTIND - 1))

# check file for typing
if [[ ! -f ${file} ]]
then
  echo 'No valid config file found.'
  exit 1
fi

# check if commit type was supplied
if [[ -z ${type} ]]
then
  echo 'No commit parameters/flags supplied...'
  exit 2
fi

# 3 -- write config file
#########################
sed "
  /timestamp:/ {
    s/\(timestamp:\).*/\1${timestamp}/
  }
  /commitmsg:/ {
    s/\(commitmsg:\).*/\1${commitmsg:-default commit message}/
  }
" ${file} > tmp

mv tmp ${file}

# 4 -- get remaining tags
##########################
author=$(grep 'author' ${file} | cut -f1 -d':' --complement)


# 5 -- get files ready to commit
#################################
git status -s | grep '^[MARCU]' | cut -c1-3 --complement > tmplist

# 6 -- invoke awk and perform substitution
###########################################
# beware to change path to your location of the awk script
for item in $(cat tmplist)
do
  echo ${item}
  awk -v "commitmsg=${commitmsg}" -v "author=${author}" \
      -v "timestamp=${timestamp}" -f "${HOME}/lib/awk/keysub.awk" ${item} \
      > tmpfile
  mv tmpfile ${item}
done
rm tmplist

# 5 -- invoke git commit
#########################
case ${type} in
  "commit_m") git commit -m "${commitmsg}" "$@"
              ;;
  "commit_a") git commit -a "$@"
              ;;
esac

# exit using success code
exit 0

keysub.awk

# 0 BEGIN
##########
BEGIN {
  FS=":"
  OFS=": "
}

# 1 parse source files 
########################
# update author
$0 ~ /.*\$Author.*\$.*/ {
  $2=author " $"
}

# update timestamp
$0 ~ /.*\$LastChangedDate.*\$.*/ {
  $0=$1
  $2=timestamp " $"
}

# update commit message
$0 ~ /.*\$LastChangeMessage.*\$.*/ {
  $2=commitmsg " $"
}

# update commit counts
$0 ~ /.*\$Rev.*\$.*/ {
  ++$2
  $2=$2 " $"
}

# print line
{
  print
}

Config file

author:ubunut-420
timestamp:Fri Jun 21 20:42:54 CEST 2013
commitmsg:default commit message

Remarks

I am still a beginning programmer/scripter so there's a big chance some parts can be done with more care towards efficiency and style but it does the trick in most cases. I've tried to document well enough so you can easily implement it and modify it to your own, personal needs. Note that you can give the macros any name you want to, as long as you modify it in the source code. I also aimed to keep it relatively easy to extend the script, you should be able to add new macros fairly easily. If you're interested in extending or modifying the script, you might want to take a look at the .git directory too, there should be plenty of info there that can help to enhance the script, due to lack of time I didn't investigate the folder though.

I hope this helps (both you and my exam, I suppose).

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6  
In case anyone wonders, it did in fact help my exam, I passed! –  ShellFish Apr 19 at 12:07

Sadly not.

Read their documentation, link attached: Keyword Expansion

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