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My code:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    FILE *fp;
    int id,q,p,r,a;
    fp = fopen("g-ip.txt","r");
    while(EOF!=fscanf(fp,"%d\t%d\t%d\t\t%d\t\t%d",&id,&q,&p,&r,&a))
        printf("%d %d %d %d %d\n",id,q,p,r,a);

    fclose(fp);

    return 0;
}

The format string is so because my g-ip.txt file has values written in the same format. On executing the code, it's giving me wrong output i.e. garbage values which are getting printed infinite times. Should I use arrays to read the values in ?But I don't want to use that.

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Slightly off topic: You do not new to specify whitespace characters in fscanf. –  steffen Jul 18 '12 at 5:29
    
Has the data file been written on the same computer? –  steffen Jul 18 '12 at 5:32
    
@steffen: yes the data has been written on the same computer –  POOJA GUPTA Jul 18 '12 at 6:01
    
OK. that rules out problems with endianity –  steffen Jul 18 '12 at 6:10
1  
I just tried your exact code and it works for me... I compiled with gcc test.c –  steffen Jul 18 '12 at 6:13
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4 Answers

Use feof and the return count of fscanf so try instead something like

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    FILE *fp;
    int id,q,p,r,a;
    fp = fopen("g-ip.txt","r");
    if (!fp) 
      perror("g-ip.txt"), exit(1);
    while(!feof(fp)) {
      id=q=p=r=a=0;
      if (fscanf(fp," %d %d %d %d %d",&id,&q,&p,&r,&a)<5)
        exit(1);
      printf("%d %d %d %d %d\n",id,q,p,r,a);
    }
    fclose(fp);
    return 0;
}

Notice that tabs are same as spaces in scanf format strings, no need for \t\t there.

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#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    FILE *fp;
    int id,q,p,r,a;
    int scanned;
    char buffer[256] = {0};
    fp = fopen("g-ip.txt","r");
    while(fgets(buffer,sizeof(buffer)-1,fp))
    {
        scanned = sscanf(buffer,"%d %d %d %d %d",&id,&q,&p,&r,&a));
        if(scanned == 5)
         printf("%d %d %d %d %d\n",id,q,p,r,a);
    }

    fclose(fp);

    return 0;
}

Try this. No need to give '\t'

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If only two integers are parsed by fscanf the condition of the while is true but the behavior is wrong. You should test feof and the result count of fscanf as I proposed. –  Basile Starynkevitch Jul 18 '12 at 5:30
    
Yeah you are right on that. But your feof method will read an extra line at the end of the file before it terminates the loop. Prefer to use fgets and sscanf instead as I have shown in my edit –  Andy Stow Away Jul 18 '12 at 5:35
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I suspect that fp is NULL, either because the file does not exist (executable and file in different directories?) or because the executable does not have permission to open it.

If the file has been successfully opened the function will return a pointer to a FILE object that is used to identify the stream on all further operations involving it. Otherwise, a null pointer is returned.

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/fopen/

You should check that it is not NULL before using it.

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I checked that too , fp is not empty , please suggest some other solution. –  POOJA GUPTA Jul 18 '12 at 5:25
1  
It is good to test result of fopen but since the OP has infinite output that is not the problem. A NULL result of fopen would have crashed the first call to fscanf ! –  Basile Starynkevitch Jul 18 '12 at 5:25
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It's difficult to tell what exactly is going wrong as you don't post an input line and resulting output line. However, as soon as fscanf fails to match, it'll fail, and more importantly, it'll probably get stuck, continually returning zeros and never finishing. A slightly more resilient solution would be something like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    FILE *fp = fopen("g-ip.txt","r");
    char enorbuf[2048];
    int errors = 0;

    while (fgets(enorbuf, sizeof(enorbuf), fp) != NULL)
    {
        int id, q, p, r, a;
        if (sscanf(enorbuf, "%d\t%d\t%d\t\t%d\t\t%d", &id, &q, &p, &r, &a) != 5)
        {
            printf("Invalid input line: %s", enorbuf);
            errors = 1;
        }
        else
        {
             printf("%d %d %d %d %d\n", id, q, p, r, a);
        }
    }

    fclose(fp);

    return errors ? EXIT_FAILURE : EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
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