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I want to make a program that can copy a file to c:\windows\system32\whatever.vbs. The problem is that I get "access denied" when its running.

I have tried to get administrator privileges but the UAC still appears. Can anybody give me a script to run my vbs as administrator and disable UAC when its running?

Here is the code :

option explicit
dim folder, root, f1, source, destination, regedit, WshNetwork

function CopyFile(source, destination)
dim filesys

set filesys=CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
  If filesys.FileExists(source) Then
     filesys.CopyFile source, destination
  End If
end function

Set WshNetwork = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Network")

set folder = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
set root = folder.GetFile(Wscript.ScriptFullName)

source = root
destination = "c:\Documents And Settings\" & WshNetwork.UserName &"\Start Menu\Programs\Startup\whatever.vbs"

call CopyFile(source,destination)

destination = "c:\Windows\System32\whatever.vbs"  -> in here access is denied

call CopyFile(Source,destination)
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We can't modify UAC settings via code –  Anuraj Jul 18 '12 at 5:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to run this script as an Administrator or a user will Administrator privileges:

runas /user:Administrator cscript vbscript.vbs

You can alternatively run it in an elevated Command Prompt or disable UAC entirely:

reg add "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System" /v EnableLUA /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f

... and reboot the system.

There is no way to programmatically do what it is you are asking. The entire purpose of UAC to "get in the way" of a such script running and throw up a warning when a process attempts privileged access.

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