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How can I express the next for loops in a rubysh way?

for (r = 1; r < R; r++) {
    for (i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
            #do something
            }
}

I want to express the above code with an elegant ruby syntax. Thanks in advance.

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I would never use this. When it is absolutely necessary , i would use while loop since its the "mother" of all loops. –  texasbruce Jul 18 '12 at 6:27
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

By default, the way I'd write that in Ruby is this:

for r in 1..(R-1) do
  for i in 0..3 do
    # Do something
  end
end

But an even better way is to take advantage of the Range feature pointed out by @PedroNascimento in his answer, using three dots rather than two in order to leave the last item out of the Range:

for r in 1...R do
  for i in 0...4 do
    # Do something
  end
end

That's both nicer to look at and more clearly expresses the meaning of the code.

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1.upto(R-1) { |r|
   4.times {|i| 
      # Do something
   }
}

RubyFiddle.

This is using the Integer's upto and times methods.

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Note that this has two bugs in it and doesn't do what the loops in the question do (they each run one too many times). –  Darshan-Josiah Barber Jul 18 '12 at 17:03
    
@DarshanComputing You're correct, will make the change. –  alex Jul 18 '12 at 23:33
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Just to keep things prettier: Ranges can also have three dots, excluding the last number. So the code would behave more closely if wrote like this:

for r in 1...R do
  for i in 0...4 do
    # Do something
  end
end
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Thanks for pointing that out; if I ever knew about three-dotted Ranges, I've long since forgotten. I've incorporated this into my answer. –  Darshan-Josiah Barber Jul 18 '12 at 6:49
    
Awesome! This is one of the features I always mistakenly use the three dots, than remember you should use just two. As such, I see the three-dot behavior all the time! :) –  Pedro Nascimento Jul 18 '12 at 14:18
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    for r in 1..R-1
       for i on 0..3
          do something
       end
    end

Here you can find more syntax help for Ruby.

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Hi thanks for your reply, but I'm not sure if that works as the original C code, for r in 1..R will be equivalent to for(r=0; r<=R; r++). Am I correct ? –  agsalcedo Jul 18 '12 at 6:10
    
initialize the value of "r" to 0 and it will work as same as you need. –  Murtaza Jul 18 '12 at 6:13
    
My apologies. you can replace R with R-1 and in the second for replace 4 with 3 . –  Shahzeb Jul 18 '12 at 6:13
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Just Another answer using Range.

r = 5 #
(1..r-1).each do|i|
  (1..3).each do |j|
       puts "i => #{i} , j => #{j}"
   end
end

This version inspired by @Pedro Nascimento 's answer.

r = 5 #
(1...r).each do|i|
  (1...3).each do |j|
       puts "i => #{i} , j => #{j}"
   end
end
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