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So I'm working on a autoupdating server list that loads all server ip:port combos and displays them into a listview. I am doing all this within a thread so I need to invoke my controls to do things to them. Here is my invoke method..

    public void invoke(MethodInvoker m) {
        try { invoke(m); } catch {} 
    }

This is my updating thread method:

    public void updater()
    {
        while (autoUpdate)
        {
            reader = new StreamReader("servers.list");
            servers = reader.ReadToEnd().Split('\n');
            reader.Close();

            invoke(new MethodInvoker(delegate { list.Clear(); }));

            foreach (String s in servers)
            {
                String[] part = new String[] { s };
                invoke(new MethodInvoker(delegate { list.Items.Add("Server Name").SubItems.AddRange(part); }));
            }

            Thread.Sleep(5000);
        }
    }

Does anyone have any idea why it is doing this? I have made applications like this before and haven't come across this problem. Maybe I am missing something but any help will be appreciated.

Thanks.

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The Thread.Sleep(5000); is for testing/demonstration only I hope? –  Henk Holterman Jul 18 '12 at 6:50
    
It's there so it doesn't update every time it has finished. I am using it because this grabs info from the servers. Is this a bad idea? –  Duncan Palmer Jul 18 '12 at 6:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to change it to:

public void invoke(MethodInvoker m) 
{
   try { someControl.Invoke(m); } catch {} 
}
share|improve this answer
    
I changed 'someControl' to 'list' (the name of my listview) it doesn't error now, but also doesn't do anything to the listview. –  Duncan Palmer Jul 18 '12 at 6:58
1  
Well, catch {} isn't very helpful in detecting what happens. –  Henk Holterman Jul 18 '12 at 7:00
    
Nevermind, it seems I was using the wrong method to clear the listview. –  Duncan Palmer Jul 18 '12 at 7:02

this looks like an infinite recursion call, end condition missing?

public void invoke(MethodInvoker m) 
{
   try { invoke(m); } catch {} 
}
share|improve this answer
    
There is no 'end condition missing', this recursion is not serving any purpose. It should never start. –  Henk Holterman Jul 18 '12 at 7:48

Your invoke method is calling itself recursively with no termination condition. What you need to do is check whether the control requires that the operation be dispatched on the UI thread, and re-invoke the method appropriately.

You should use the Invoke method on some control that was created on the same thread (this could be the control which will be updated, or it could be the parent form; it doesn't really matter):

public void invoke(MethodInvoker m) 
{
   try { this.Invoke(m); } catch {} 
}

As a side note, though, it's very bad practice to have an empty umbrella catch block like that. In doing so you're essentially ignoring any possible error that might occur, whether or not it can/should be ignored. You should only attempt to catch exceptions that you know how to deal with; otherwise, let it propagate back up the stack to some code that can deal with it.

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