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I got this simple program read in a string like "13 11 9 10". I wanna split string then sort them. however the sort() seems not working, any help? input: 13 11 9 10 , output: 13 11 9 10 Thanks!

#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

vector<int> split(string s)
{
    istringstream iss(s);
    vector<int> result;

    do{
        string sub;
        iss>>sub;
        if(sub!="")
            result.push_back((int)atoi(sub.c_str()));
    }while(iss);

    return result;
}
int main(void)
{   
    string s;
    while(cin>>s)
    {
        vector<int> vec;
        vec=split(s);
        sort(vec.begin(), vec.end());
        for (int i = 0; i < vec.size(); ++i)
        {
            cout<<vec[i]<<endl;
        }
    }
}
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1  
    
The problem is not with std::sort(), but with your split(string) method. –  iammilind Jul 18 '12 at 7:02
    
The problem is at cin>>s, which already splits your input string. Try something like getline() instead. –  timrau Jul 18 '12 at 7:05
    
@iammilind: Nope, the split method is okay. –  Benjamin Lindley Jul 18 '12 at 7:05
1  
@BenjaminLindley Not really. It has at least two errors: it accesses sub without checking if the read has succeeded, and it doesn't verify anything. (Of course, since it will never be passed a string with any white space in it, it will never find more than one entry.) –  James Kanze Jul 18 '12 at 7:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

That's because cin >> s stops at the first whitespace.

In other words, if you type 1 4 2 3, s contains 1 only, and not the entire line.

Instead, use the following to read the entire line:

std::getline(std::cin, s);
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2  
In addition, don't use atoi, have a look here stackoverflow.com/questions/200090/… –  Johan Lundberg Jul 18 '12 at 7:10
1  
I find it worth mentioning that I don't see std::stoi anywhere in the link, or the duplicate of it. That's probably the best method if it's available. –  chris Jul 18 '12 at 7:20
    
@chris If it's available; it's part of C++11. And from the specification, it seems to suffer from the same problems as atoi: no real error checking is possible. In the end, you've got to go with strtol, setting errno to 0 before hand, and passing a pointer to a place where strtol will store the end pointer, then verifying that errno == 0 && end != start && *end == '\0'. –  James Kanze Jul 18 '12 at 7:46
    
@JamesKanze, No error checking? It has two possible exceptions to throw in the case of an error: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/string/basic_string/stol. If that's why you added real there, it's still possible to catch them and handle them in the same way as you would a bad result from strtol. –  chris Jul 18 '12 at 7:48
    
@chris It only throws an error if strtol reports an error. That covers the case where errno != 0 above (I suppose---the standard doesn't say what "reports an error" means with regards to strtol.) You still have the problem of something like "abcxyz", where strtol simply returns 0, without reporting an error. –  James Kanze Jul 18 '12 at 8:29

your main section of code is incorrect, cin already splits data into parts, use cin.getline with buffer or what Cicida suggests above, my working code looks like this:

string s;
char buffer[ 256 ];
do
{
    cin.getline( buffer, 255 );
    s.assign( buffer );
    vector<int> vec;
    vec=split(s);
    sort(vec.begin(), vec.end());
    for (int i = 0; i < vec.size(); ++i)
    {
        cout<<vec[i]<<endl;
    }
}while( !s.empty( ));
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