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I was reading this thread Tab versus space indentation in C# reagrding Tab versus space indentation. The moral of the thread leads to "Tabs for indentation, spaces for alignment." Can you explain me with some code example what does indentation means and what does spaces means wrt code? I am just confused with the two things in the context of code?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Example from that thread:

switch(foo)
{
   case bar:      Do1(); break;
   case foobar_2: Do2(); break;
}

here, keyword 'case' is indented. "bar:" and "foobar_2:" are aligned to the left.

You can imagine there is a box, where the same words can be either left- or right-aligned. Left:

switch(foo)
{
   case bar:      Do1(); break;
   case foobar_2: Do2(); break;
}

Right:

switch(foo)
{
   case      bar: Do1(); break;
   case foobar_2: Do2(); break;
}

as this kind of thing will become messed up if done with tabs due to different tab configuration, spaces are a must here. However, with different tab width configuration, indentation just becomes like this:

switch(foo)
{
       case bar:      Do1(); break;
       case foobar_2: Do2(); break;
}

which is more a matter of preference as it does not mess up which line matches what.

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In the Java code convention, it suggests using spaces always. This appears with the same indentation in every editor and is simpler than a mixed tab/space approach.

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1  
I think the question was about "what do indentation and alignment mean and how do they look like in the code" instead of "what should I do about it" –  eis Jul 18 '12 at 7:13
    
@eis You are correct. As the question was tagged with [java] its worth pointing out that it doesn't follow convention and shouldn't be used, nor with any code formatter do alignment for you. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 18 '12 at 7:15

Here you can see an example of alignment - conditions are aligned to be one under another. You cannot achieve this with tabs in general, because

a) If tab size is 2 or 4, then you cannot express 3 spaces with tabs

b) Even if the tab size on your computer is 3 and you managed to align with tabs, another person can have different tab size and alignment would break (conditions would not be one under another.

Alignment sample

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I think this is an example of indentation, not alignment. Fair point though: in this case tabs for indentation would not work as well as spaces. –  eis Jul 18 '12 at 7:55
    
This is exactly "alignment" because several language construct are "aligned" one under another. –  Dmitry Osinovskiy Jul 18 '12 at 9:34
    
Ok, now that I re-think it, you are correct. Yes, it is. –  eis Jul 18 '12 at 17:17
public class SwitchDemo {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        int month = 8;
        String monthString;
        switch (month) {
            case 1:  monthString = "January";
                     break;
            case 2:  monthString = "February";
                     break;
            case 3:  monthString = "March";
                     break;
            case 4:  monthString = "April";
                     break;
            case 5:  monthString = "May";
                     break;
            case 6:  monthString = "June";
                     break;
            case 7:  monthString = "July";
                     break;
            case 8:  monthString = "August";
                     break;
            case 9:  monthString = "September";
                     break;
            case 10: monthString = "October";
                     break;
            case 11: monthString = "November";
                     break;
            case 12: monthString = "December";
                     break;
            default: monthString = "Invalid month";
                     break;
        }
        System.out.println(monthString);
    }
}

The indentation on lines is made with tabs.
The alignment in switch-case statement is done with spaces.

ttttttttttttttttcase 9:ssmonthString = "September";
ttttttttttttttttttttttttsbreak;
ttttttttttttttttcase 10:smonthString = "October";
ttttttttttttttttttttttttsbreak;

tttts represents one tab
s represents one space

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