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I'm explaining what I'm actually hoping to do in case there's a higher level suggestion that obviates the question entirely.

I have scientific data that I store in three arrays: wave, flux, error. These stand for wavelength, flux, and error values. The arrays are about 4000 elements long (and the index number of the arrays corresponds to the pixel number of the detector).

There are various tests that I do, but for this example let's just say I do 2 tests where I need to effectively mask out the associated arrays.

masks = []
masks.append(wave > 5500.35)
masks.append(flux / wave > 8.5)

Subquestion: I can easily do the 2-mask case like:

fullmask = [x[0] and x[1] for x in zip(masks[0], masks[1])]

but what's the way to do it for arbitrary numbers of masks?

Real question: Is there a way to apply all masks to each of the arrays (wave, flux, error), and keep the original index numbers? By "keep the original index numbers" I mean that I could, in principle, take the average pixel number of the masked wave array (the original index numbers)? That is: if wave[98:99] were the only parts not masked, the average pixel would be 98.5.

Meta question: is this the best way to be doing any of this stuff?


EDIT

So here's some sample data to play around with.

wave = array([5000, 5001, 5002, 5003, 5004, 5005, 5006, 5007, 5008, 5009, 5010,
   5011, 5012, 5013, 5014, 5015, 5016, 5017, 5018, 5019, 5020, 5021,
   5022, 5023, 5024, 5025, 5026, 5027, 5028, 5029, 5030, 5031, 5032,
   5033, 5034, 5035, 5036, 5037, 5038, 5039, 5040, 5041, 5042, 5043,
   5044, 5045, 5046, 5047, 5048, 5049, 5050, 5051, 5052, 5053, 5054,
   5055, 5056, 5057, 5058, 5059, 5060, 5061, 5062, 5063, 5064, 5065,
   5066, 5067, 5068, 5069, 5070, 5071, 5072, 5073, 5074, 5075, 5076,
   5077, 5078, 5079, 5080, 5081, 5082, 5083, 5084, 5085, 5086, 5087,
   5088, 5089, 5090, 5091, 5092, 5093, 5094, 5095, 5096, 5097, 5098,
   5099])

flux = array([ 112.65878609,  109.2008992 ,  113.30629929,  117.17002715,
   103.19663878,  110.42131523,  106.00841123,  100.27882741,
   103.89160905,  102.29402469,  105.58894696,  103.21314852,
    96.97242814,  106.70130478,  108.83891225,  110.60598803,
    95.10361887,  109.39734257,  103.08289878,  104.97258911,
    96.46606257,  106.75993458,   99.25386914,  105.91429417,
   105.83752232,  100.53312657,   99.74871394,  107.12735837,
   108.81187473,   96.51418895,   99.71311101,   94.08702553,
    98.81198643,   93.84567201,  103.21444519,   94.7027134 ,
    99.61842203,  103.71336458,  100.8697998 ,   92.1564786 ,
    96.56711985,   94.7728761 ,   82.65194671,   83.52280884,
    86.57960844,   73.6700194 ,   66.11794666,   61.01624627,
    63.19944529,   55.50283247,   62.09172307,   59.55436092,
    75.66399466,   70.69397378,   64.27899192,   73.80248662,
    89.17119606,   78.97024327,   82.3334254 ,  100.82581489,
   102.77937201,   99.37717696,   96.2215563 ,  104.52291339,
    93.7581944 ,   93.32154346,  103.57018896,  108.08682518,
   105.2711359 ,  100.00242988,  100.86934866,  103.20764384,
   104.19274473,  101.3314802 ,  102.75057114,   94.02347591,
    95.48758551,  106.0099397 ,   99.50733501,   97.88110415,
   107.54266965,  107.76126331,   98.14882302,  101.55654606,
   101.02418212,  106.82324958,   95.52086925,  102.65957133,
   104.93806492,  103.22762427,  108.02087993,  106.71911141,
    97.24396195,  103.3450277 ,  113.99870588,  106.4145751 ,
   110.08294674,  109.40908288,  118.61518086,  114.37341062])

error = array([ 11.72799338,  22.33423611,  16.89347382,  12.80063102,
   23.99242356,  25.15863754,  20.44765811,  14.84358628,
   19.16343785,  19.5703491 ,  18.44427035,  19.08648083,
   19.09116433,  12.22098884,  14.81280352,  11.35010222,
   18.59850136,  15.78855734,  21.85877638,  20.12179042,
   22.04894395,  21.986731  ,  13.26738352,  16.10987762,
   24.28528627,  30.11866128,  25.30220842,  25.02100014,
   29.38560916,  16.8192307 ,  29.15097205,  23.56805267,
   15.17285709,  18.27495747,  18.63750452,  18.61618504,
   11.45940025,  21.95805701,  24.22923951,  11.76824052,
   19.75465065,  14.72979889,  15.45936176,  14.73227474,
   28.91683627,  22.90534472,  16.82376093,  21.47830226,
   20.05012214,  16.74393817,  17.79456361,  20.80008233,
   19.32059989,  23.23471888,  13.77434964,  17.56121752,
   15.96716163,  18.5294016 ,  28.31005939,  13.66340359,
   10.38160267,  16.09621015,  18.25125683,  20.95954331,
   21.31996941,  24.51998489,  16.58831953,  15.25427142,
   23.93065281,  30.4552266 ,  16.94527367,  16.92730802,
   17.79659417,  18.85080572,  18.0839428 ,  23.93949481,
   26.60243553,  13.68320208,  16.74669921,  20.30238694,
   12.74773905,  19.20810456,  20.7189417 ,  20.73402554,
   17.12106905,  25.06475175,  13.0947528 ,  28.16437938,
   22.4803386 ,  13.71143627,   6.60617725,  20.41186825,
   23.54924934,  22.25930658,  20.09337438,  24.94705884,
   18.58056249,   5.58653271,  18.71242702,  17.83578444])


# How I created masks, or just jump to next comment if it's too painful to look at...
masks = []
masks.append(flux/error > 4.0) # high error
absorptionMask1 = (wave < 5060)
absorptionMask2 = (wave > 5040)
bob = [all(x) for x in zip(absorptionMask1, absorptionMask2)]
absorptionMask = ~np.array(bob)
masks.append(absorptionMask) 

# The resulting mask
masks = [array([ True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,
       True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,
       True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True, False, False,
       True, False,  True, False, False,  True,  True,  True,  True,
       True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True, False,
      False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False,
       True,  True,  True,  True, False,  True,  True,  True,  True,
       True,  True, False,  True,  True,  True, False,  True,  True,
       True,  True,  True, False, False,  True,  True,  True,  True,
       True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True, False,  True,  True,
       True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True], dtype=bool),
array([ True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,
       True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,
       True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,
       True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,
       True,  True,  True,  True,  True, False, False, False, False,
      False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False,
      False, False, False, False, False, False,  True,  True,  True,
       True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,
       True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,
       True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,
       True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True], dtype=bool)]


# More in a bit, should get you a feel for what I'm looking at. 
share|improve this question
2  
p.s., the term is "filter", not a mask. Mask implies something else in the context of programming. –  Jeff Mercado Jul 18 '12 at 7:36
    
@JeffMercado, good to know! I'll change the tags. –  JBWhitmore Jul 18 '12 at 7:40
    
Could you provide a small sample data set that we can play with? I must admit I'm not totally getting what exactly you're trying to do. –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 18 '12 at 7:40
    
Yeah, I'll be back w/ some sample data in a min. –  JBWhitmore Jul 18 '12 at 7:41
    
Some sample data added... –  JBWhitmore Jul 18 '12 at 8:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

otherwise you can use boolean operators, let's define en example:

d=np.arange(10)
masks = [d>5, d % 2 == 0, d<8]

you can use reduce to combine all of them:

total_mask = reduce(np.logical_and, masks)

you can also use boolean operators explicitely if you need to manually choose the masks:

total_mask = masks[0] & masks[1] & masks[2]
share|improve this answer
    
about your data storage, I would use a structured array, so that you can have a single array, but you can get fields by name. –  Andrea Zonca Jul 18 '12 at 8:11
    
This is very useful to me. I'm looking into the structured arrays; I imagine using them like dictionaries, but is there a reason to use one over the other? –  JBWhitmore Jul 19 '12 at 7:47
1  
its usage is similar to dictionaries, but you can also go through the structured arrays row by row, or select for example the first n rows all at once without slicing each array separately. –  Andrea Zonca Jul 19 '12 at 9:02

I think you're looking for the star operator:

fullmask = [all(mask) for mask in zip(*masks)]

...although I'm not sure I understand your data structure completely.

share|improve this answer
    
Hello Tim, can you please explain what it does in this case? –  Ayoubi Jul 18 '12 at 7:37
    
1. the star operator def. answers my subquestion. 2. The data structure is part of what I'm revisiting to see if I can do it better. The basic idea is I can plot flux vs. wavelength by just doing: plot(wave, flux). But I'm not sure that storing them as separate arrays makes the most sense or if there's an obvious better way. –  JBWhitmore Jul 18 '12 at 7:38
    
@Ayoubi: It does the same thing that [x[0] and x[1] for x in zip(masks[0], masks[1])] does, but not just for a masks array of length 2 but for arbitrary lengths. –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 18 '12 at 7:38
    
You have an extra ) in the zip() –  JBWhitmore Jul 18 '12 at 8:02
    
@JBWhitmore: Whoops, thanks. Fixed. –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 18 '12 at 8:06

How about using numpy record arrays?

import numpy as np

# create some data
pixel = np.arange(4000)
wave = pixel / 4000. + 5500
flux = pixel / 4000. + 9.5 * 5500
data = np.rec.fromarrays((pixel, wave, flux), names='pixel, wave, flux')

mask = data.wave > 5500.25
mask &= data.flux / data.wave > 8.5

print data[mask].pixel.mean()
share|improve this answer

If I understand properly, what you want is to filter the arrays.

Here's an example for filtering an array

your_array = [1, 5, 6000]    
filter(lambda elem: elem > 5000, your_array)

This returns [6000]

When you say "keep the original index numbers", I think you mean you want to test your condition on each element and store the result for each element? If so, you may want to use map

your_array = [1, 5, 6000]
map(lambda elem: elem > 5000, your_array)

This returns [False, False, True]

You can replace all of the lambda's with functions you define if you have more complex conditions.

P.S. I think it would help if you give an example input and example output of what you want. The wording of the question is confusing.

EDIT:

With the example data, I think this is what you want, feel free to comment. This method helps you avoid storing lists of True, False and then finding the index of the elements you want afterwards. It will return you a list of the indexes and allow you to use fewer steps to compute the average.

# Given wave, error, and flux the way you defined

# If wave is [21.2, 34.1, 43.423], then this returns [(0, 21.2), (1, 34.1), (2, 43.423)]
# Each element is now a tuple of (index, elem)
enum_wave = enumerate(wave)

# Returns a list of the indexes that pass the condition
# For example, if only 98, and 99 aren't filtered out, this will return [98, 99]
masked_wave = [index for index, elem in enum_wave if elem > 5060]

# To find the average
sum(masked_wave) / float(len(masked_wave))
share|improve this answer

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