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Suppose I'm creating a class called Hitchhiker.

package hi.my.name.is {
    public function Hitchhiker():void {
        // ...
    }

    public function nullify():void {
        this = null;
    }
}

And then it gives me an error:

Error: Cannot assign to a non-reference value.

What the heck? I though you can set an instance to null, like:

var hitchhiker:Hitchhiker = new Hitchhiker();
hitchhiker = null;

Why can't I do this in the class? I'm intending to remove all event listeners by setting the reference to weak reference, then nullify the instance to remove them all. Why can't I?

Anybody help me?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Where have you defined the class in the first place? This is how you define the class:

package xyz {

    public class Hitchhiker {

        public function Hitchhiker():void {

        }

        public function nullify():void {
            this = null;
        }
    }
}

Besides your error comes here: this = null;


Basically the error means you cannot nullify the object from inside the instance of the class, you can only nullify the object from outside, which you are already doing.

So remove the function 'nullify'.


Example of using dispatchEvent:

public function nullify():void { 

            dispatchEvent(new Event("destroyMe")); 
}

You can listen to it by:

obj.addEventListener("destroyMe", destroyObject);

function destroyObject(event:Event):void { 

            // set your object to null here 
}

Or a better way could be to use Arrays to keep track of the objects created.

But I am still not sure why you don't want GC to handle this.

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1  
Yeah, you can't make instance suicide :) –  Rytis Alekna Jul 18 '12 at 8:37
    
then, don't answer, thank you. –  Greek Fellows Jul 18 '12 at 9:22
    
loxxy, thanks for your answer, then is it possible to dispatch an custom-made event (say, NullifyEvent) then something outside the Hitchhiker class listens to it then turn the Hitchhiker instance to null? –  Greek Fellows Jul 18 '12 at 9:24
    
@GreekFellows definitely. You can listen to it or you can create an static array keeping track of all the instances. –  loxxy Jul 18 '12 at 9:26
1  
@loxxy This is pointless. You can implement a destroy()method for every object, which dispatches MyDestructionEvent.DESTROYED. But then you're likely going to derive all your objects from a common super class. And then you're getting into inheritance trouble again. I'd rather use a standard event in most cases and find a different solution for the few times it doesn't apply. Regardless - using static arrays to keep track of things is a bad idea. Let each class instance handle its own variables. –  weltraumpirat Jul 18 '12 at 10:37
this = null;
hitchhiker = null;

These actions are not equal. Actually, the first is senseless action. If you want to prepare your object for GC you should remove all references.

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what do you mean by and how to remove all references? if you are answering, i hope you'll be more specific, not just tell me that first one is senseless. –  Greek Fellows Jul 18 '12 at 8:30
    
Basically it means you cannot nullify the object from inside the instance of the class, you can only nullify the object from outside, which you are already doing. So remove the function 'nullify'. –  loxxy Jul 18 '12 at 8:44
1  
@loxxy You should really include that in your own answer... –  weltraumpirat Jul 18 '12 at 9:19

The this pointer is an automatic feature of the programming language, not a "regular" variable instance, that's why you can't set it to null. Variable instances have to be declared and assigned, neither of which is true for this. And of course, it does not affect garbage collection, either, so there is absolutely no need to clear it.

But apart from these language specific details, there are also some interesting universal facts that apply to most or all OO languages:

  • If a retained object could set its own instance to null, it would have to know about the structure of its "parent" class - which breaks encapsulation, creates very strong coupling, is a violation of the single responsibility principle, and leads to rigid and fragile code. Not a good idea. Hence, we should let the class that actually holds the reference decide when it is done using it.
  • What if the same object instance is assigned to more than one variable? If there were a single point at which the object is discarded, some references might still be in use - which opens up your application to a plethora of memory segmentation faults. To prevent those, you always have to manually keep track of all the places where a reference is used, and be absolutely sure there is no further need for it, before deleting. Can you imagine how much more work this involves? That is, if you do this yourself, before compilation, in your code.
  • But wait a minute, you could always... umm... think of an automated mechanism to keep track of variable references at runtime! It would keep a record of where they are used, clear each reference when a signal is received that it is no longer needed by the class that holds it, check if any other references exist, and eventually free up memory when all are gone. Great idea! Now all we have to think about is how to implement that signal... and thank heaven, it has already been done: Setting a variable to null means: "I don't need this any longer." - The purpose of the GC mechanism is to do all that memory management for you, so you can worry about your program's functionality. All you have to do is take care of sending the signal from the right place.
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thanks for that complete and specific answer. –  Greek Fellows Jul 18 '12 at 9:25

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