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In python all data is object and any object should have attributes and methods. Does somebody know python object without any attributes and methods?

>>> len(dir(1))
64
share|improve this question
    
yes just try it in python 2.7 – Пуя Jul 18 '12 at 8:25
    
Guys sorry, I tried it in Pycharm, it returns nothing, but when I tried it in IDLE, it returned a list of attributes and methods – Пуя Jul 18 '12 at 8:41

This is easy to accomplish by overriding __dir__ and __getattribute__:

class Empty(object):
    def __dir__(self):
        return []
    def __getattribute__(self, name):
        raise AttributeError("'{0}' object has no attribute '{1}'".format(type(self).__name__, name))

e = Empty()
dir(e)
[]
e.__name__
AttributeError: 'Empty' object has no attribute '__name__'

(In , Empty needs to be a new-style class, so the class Empty(object): is required; in old-style classes are extinct so class Empty: is sufficient.)

share|improve this answer
    
dir(x) returning empty list doesn't means x has no attributes/methods. – Paulo Scardine Jul 18 '12 at 8:43
    
@PauloScardine you can override __getattribute__ as well. – ecatmur Jul 18 '12 at 8:53
    
e.__class__ results __main__.Empty even with your tricks. – Paulo Scardine Jul 18 '12 at 8:59
1  
@PauloScardine right, for Python2 you need to change it to class Empty(object); I mentioned that right after the code. – ecatmur Jul 18 '12 at 9:17
1  
@ecatmur: Wouldn't changing your answer to class Empty(object): make it work for both Python 2.2+ through 3.x? – martineau Jul 18 '12 at 18:25

Havn't came across any such object, which doesn;t have any attribute.. see below

In [74]: class dummy():
   ....:     pass
   ....:

In [75]: d1 = dummy()

In [76]: dir(d1)
Out[76]: ['__doc__', '__module__']

In [77]: len(dir(d1))
Out[77]: 2

even None has attributes...

In [78]: dir(None)
Out[78]:
['__class__',
 '__delattr__',
 '__doc__',
 '__format__',
 '__getattribute__',
 '__hash__',
 '__init__',
 '__new__',
 '__reduce__',
 '__reduce_ex__',
 '__repr__',
 '__setattr__',
 '__sizeof__',
 '__str__',
 '__subclasshook__']
share|improve this answer

Yes! (or no...)

def AMeta(name, bases, dct):
    class NoProp:
        pass
    del NoProp.__doc__
    del NoProp.__module__
    return NoProp

class A:
    __metaclass__ = AMeta

print dir(A), 'len', len(dir(A))

print
print 'but... A.__name__ is', A.__name__
print 'Delete it!'
try:
    del A.__name__
except Exception as e:
    print 'Did not work: ', repr(e)

print
print 'and... A.__dict__ is', A.__dict__
print 'Delete it!'
try:
    del A.__dict__
except Exception as e:
    print 'Did not work: ', repr(e)

print
print 'and... A.__bases__ is', A.__bases__
print 'Delete it!'
try:
    del A.__bases__
except Exception as e:
    print 'Did not work: ', repr(e)

print 
print 'What is the type of A?'
t = type(A)
print t, 'which is a', type(t)

print "All of these will raise an AttributeError:"
print "A.__class__, A.__module__, (and maybe some others which are usually there too...)"

Normally, all objects have some attributes whatever these are. But when using metaclasses, you can customize the way the class is created, and there you have it.

However, even if dir is empty, you can still access A.__name__, A.__dict__, A.__bases__.

This is what the tests I made gave me:

[] len 0

but... A.__name__ is NoProp
Delete it!
Did not work:  TypeError('__name__ must be a string object',)

and... A.__dict__ is {}
Delete it!
Did not work:  TypeError('__dict__ must be a dictionary object',)

and... A.__bases__ is ()
Delete it!
Did not work:  TypeError('__bases__ must be a tuple object',)

What is the type of A?
<type 'classobj'> which is a <type 'type'>
All of these will raise an AttributeError:
A.__class__, A.__module__, (and maybe some others which are usually there too...)
share|improve this answer
    
so the answer is "no", even if dir(x) returns empty, x still has methods/attributes. – Paulo Scardine Jul 18 '12 at 8:45
    
@PauloScardine You're right, but that A class still passes his test. Doesn't it? – jadkik94 Jul 18 '12 at 8:49
    
dir(len(1)) isn't the test. It's just visualization of question – Volodymyr Pavlenko Jul 18 '12 at 8:54
    
What were you basing your facts on? What dir returned... Anyway, I added details, the answer is "no", but can look like "yes". – jadkik94 Jul 18 '12 at 8:56

You can create an object without any "public" attributes and methods:

class Bare(object):
    pass

But this object will have some internal/standard methods and attributes:

>>> x = Bare()
>>> dir(x)
['__class__',
 '__delattr__',
 '__doc__',
 '__format__',
 '__getattribute__',
 '__hash__',
 '__init__',
 '__new__',
 '__reduce__',
 '__reduce_ex__',
 '__repr__',
 '__setattr__',
 '__sizeof__',
 '__str__',
 '__subclasshook__']

Python has no concept of enforced private methods and attributes, everything is exposed. However, by convention, you should avoid external access to methods and attributes beginning with _, these should be reserved for internal use (double underscores for Python internal methods). In practice you can check for an instance without any "public" attributes:

>>> filter(lambda a: a[0] != '_', dir(x))
[]

>>> len(filter(lambda a: a[0] != '_', dir(x)))
0

Even if you cheat by overriding __dir__ and __getattribute__, the built-in attributes are still there and can be accessed using __getattribute__ from the parent class (thanks for martineau to point me this):

class FakeEmpty:
    def __dir__(self):
        return []
    def __getattribute__(self, name):
        raise AttributeError("'{0}' object has no attribute '{1}'".format(type(self).__name__, name))

>>> e = FakeEmpty()
>>> object.__getattribute__(e, '__class__')
__main__.Empty

So the answer is: not really, but you can almost fake it.

share|improve this answer
    
you are inheriting from object class, the Bare class will have some attributes of object class – avasal Jul 18 '12 at 8:22
    
Indeed, you can declare "old style" classes that don't inherit from object, but should you do it in modern Python? – Paulo Scardine Jul 18 '12 at 8:24
    
yes, new style class are very good, but my only point was, even in old style classes, object will have attributes :) – avasal Jul 18 '12 at 8:25

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