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I want to limit the size of records inside a group, and here is my trial, how to do it right?

mysql> select * from accounts limit 5 group by type;

ERROR 1064 (42000): You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'group by type' at line 1

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I think that what you want is an order, not a group. You want to list up to 5 of each account type, right? – Plutor Jul 20 '09 at 17:39
    
yes,how to achieve that? – omg Jul 20 '09 at 17:47
2  
Just By The Way, you have to put the Limit at the 'end' of the query. – Tyler Carter Jul 20 '09 at 21:30
    
This thread is 6 years old, but if you found this on Google check out Adam Prescott's answer below. It is fast and the method is extensible to other more difficult aggregates, such as median aggregate. – Chris Strickland Mar 25 '15 at 18:13

The point of an aggregate function (and the GROUP BY it requires) is to turn many rows into one row. So if you really just want the top 5 savings accounts and the top 5 chequing accounts and the top 5 USD accounts etc., what you need is more like this:

criteria: top 5 of particular account type by account_balance

SELECT account_type, account_balance FROM accounts WHERE account_type='savings' 
   ORDER BY account_balance DESC LIMIT 5
UNION
SELECT account_type, account_balance FROM accounts WHERE account_type='chequing' 
   ORDER BY account_balance DESC LIMIT 5
UNION
SELECT account_type, account_balance FROM accounts WHERE account_type='USD' 
   ORDER BY account_balance DESC LIMIT 5;

It's not pretty, but if you construct the SQL with a script then subbing in the account_types and concatenating together a query is straightforward.

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I've had some luck with using numbered rows:

set @type = '';
set @num = 0;

select
  items.*,
  @num := if(@type = item_type, @num + 1, 1) as dummy_1,
  @type := item_type as dummy_2,
  @num as row_number
from items
group by
  item_type,
  row_number
having row_number < 3;

This will give you 2 results per item_type. (One gotcha: make sure you re-run the first two set statements otherwise your row numbers will steadily get higher and higher and the row_number < 3 restriction won't work.

I pieced this together from a couple of posts which have been linked in other answers on SO.

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1  
This is the best answer. One thing you can do is to use something like this: from items, (SELECT @type:='', @num:=0) v and then you can set the variables inside the join, instead of in a separate statement. That can be helpful in environments that don't allow multiple statements. – Chris Strickland Mar 25 '15 at 5:36

It appears you want to limit the number of rows returned within each group of your overall result set... this is difficult to do in a way that scales well. One technique is to perform N joins on the same table with the conditions such that the only rows that match are the top/bottom N that you want.

this page may offer some additional insight into your solution... although returning the top 5 in each group is going to get ugly fast.

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Try placing the LIMIT clause after the GROUP BY clause.

EDIT: Try this:

SELECT * 
FROM accounts a1
WHERE 5 > 
(
   SELECT COUNT(*)
   FROM accounts a2
   WHERE a2.type = a1.type
   AND a2.balance > a1.balance
)

This returns at most 5 accounts of each type with the biggest balances.

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that's not what i want... – omg Jul 20 '09 at 14:20

Group by is used for aggregate functions (sums, averages...)

Is allows you to split the aggregate result into groups. You have not used one of these functions.

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I am not sure you can use a limit in the group by. You can probably use it if your group by is a sub select that returns one row/value. For example:

select * from foo order by (select foo2.id from foo2 limit 1)

I am just guessing this would work.

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This will probably do the trick, although if type isn't indexed, it'll be sloooowwww. And even with one, it's not especially fast:

SELECT a.*
FROM accounts a
     LEFT JOIN accounts a2 ON (a2.type = a.type AND a2.id < a.id)
WHERE count(a2.id) < 5
GROUP BY a.id;

A better bet would be to just order the list by type and then use a loop at the business layer to remove the rows you don't want.

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@dnagirl's answer almost has it, but for some reason, my version of MySQL only returns the first LIMIT'd set. To get around that, I put each statement into a subquery

SELECT * FROM (
    SELECT account_type, account_balance FROM accounts WHERE account_type='savings' 
       ORDER BY account_balance DESC LIMIT 5
) as a
UNION
SELECT* FROM (
    SELECT account_type, account_balance FROM accounts WHERE account_type='chequing' 
       ORDER BY account_balance DESC LIMIT 5
) as b
UNION
SELECT * FROM (
    SELECT account_type, account_balance FROM accounts WHERE account_type='USD' 
       ORDER BY account_balance DESC LIMIT 5
) as c

This gave me back each set's results in the final result set. Otherwise, I would have only gotten the first 5 from the first query and nothing else - not sure if it's just some MySQL funk with my version

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