Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was using the following basic PHP:

<?php

    if (file_exists('count_file.txt')) 
    {
        $fil = fopen('count_file.txt', r);
        $dat = fread($fil, filesize('count_file.txt')); 
        echo $dat+1;
        fclose($fil);
        $fil = fopen('count_file.txt', w);
        fwrite($fil, $dat+1);
    }

    else
    {
        $fil = fopen('count_file.txt', w);
        fwrite($fil, 1);
        echo '1';
        fclose($fil);
    }
?>

as a hit counter (I'd rather not have one but it's been insisted we do). The txt file keeps count of the hits and it works...however the counter randomly (sometimes after a few weeks, sometimes months later) decides to trip up and drops from say 4300 to 11.

I was told the fix for this was to use file locking so I changed to the following code:

<?php 

        $dat = file_get_contents('count_file.txt'); 
        $fil = fopen('count_file.txt', 'w'); 
        if (flock($fil, LOCK_EX)) { 
            echo $dat+1; 
            fwrite($fil, $dat+1); 
            flock($fil, LOCK_UN); 
        } 
        fclose($fil); 

    ?> 

and now after a few days it has once again dropped from over 5000 to 13. Anyone have some idea as to why??

share|improve this question
    
Why not to store counts in database? And if needed in external file, then run some script to get the number of hits? –  dpitkevics Jul 18 '12 at 8:49
    
I'm not PHP savvy so would not know how to go about storing it in a database? –  John Jul 18 '12 at 8:55

2 Answers 2

Use fopen "a" instead of fopen "w" and then truncate the file:

<?php
    $dat = file_get_contents('count_file.txt'); 
    $fil = fopen('count_file.txt', 'a'); 
    if (flock($fil, LOCK_EX)) { 
        ftruncate($fil,0);
        echo $dat+1; 
        fwrite($fil, $dat+1); 
        flock($fil, LOCK_UN); 
    } 
    fclose($fil); 
?> 
share|improve this answer

You fopen() the file for writing which truncates the file. If you cannot get a lock you close the file which may be truncated then to zero bytes.

share|improve this answer
    
if he doesnt get the lock that should usually mean that it is locked otherwise. how is he able to truncate it to zero then? –  mightyuhu Jul 18 '12 at 8:54
    
I think this can at least happen when process A (holding the lock) has written to the file and process B opens the file for writing before the file is unlocked and closed by A. –  mdo Jul 18 '12 at 9:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.