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does anyone know of some good elisp macros for cleaning up LaTeX code?

I do a lot of LaTeX editing of other peoples sources and I'd like to extend my set of clean up tools since not everyone organize their code in the manner I like it ;-)

One in particular would be interesting, to run function X on a buffer and get all LaTeX environments (\begin{...} and \end{...} pairs) to sit on lines of their own, this helps readability of the code.

I could try this myself, but would like to hear suggestions as to a best practice for programming such a function, e.g. it should of course not introduce blank lines of its own.

suggestions?

Edit: For the archives, here are my current version based on the answer given (assumes the use of auctex). It more or less suits my needs at the moment. I added the y-or-n test just to be able to detect corner cases that I had not thought of.

(defun enviro-split ()
  "Find begin and end macros, and put them on their own line."
  (interactive)
  (save-excursion
(beginning-of-buffer)

;; loop over document looking for begin and end macros
(while (re-search-forward "\\\\\\(begin\\|end\\)" nil t)
  (catch 'continue 

    ; if the line is a pure comment, then goto next
    (if (TeX-in-commented-line)
    (throw 'continue nil)
      )
    ;; when you find one, back up to the beginning of the macro
    (search-backward "\\")

    ;; If it's not at the beginning of the line, add a newline
    (when (not (looking-back "^[ \t]*"))
      (if (y-or-n-p "newline?")
      (insert "\n")
    )
      )

    ;; move over the arguments, one or two pairs of matching braces
    (search-forward "{")        ; start of the argument
    (forward-char -1)
    (forward-sexp)          ; move over the argument
    (if (looking-at "[ \t]*{")  ; is there a second argument?
    (forward-sexp)
      )             ; move over it if so
    (if (looking-at "[ \t]*\\[")    ; is there a second argument?
    (forward-sexp)
      )             ; move over it if so
    (when (looking-at (concat "[ \t]*" (regexp-quote TeX-esc) "label"))
      (goto-char (match-end 0))
      (forward-sexp)
      )

    (if (looking-at (concat "[ \t]*%" ))
    (throw 'continue nil)
      ) 

    ;; If there is anything other than whitespace following the macro,
    ;; insert a newline
    (if (not (looking-at "\\s *$"))
    ;;(insert "\n")
    (if (y-or-n-p "newline (a)?")
        (insert "\n")
      )
      )
    ) ; end catch 'continue
  )
(LaTeX-fill-buffer 'left)
)
  )
share|improve this question
    
For the archives, you should accept my answer, or add your edit as an answer and accept that. Otherwise, the question remains 'unsolved'. Also, if you find an answer helpful, even if you don't accept it as the best answer, giving it an upvote is appreciated. –  Tyler Jul 20 '12 at 15:32
    
sorry, added both –  daleif Jul 20 '12 at 16:25
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could probably work up a single regexp and do a regexp replace for this. However, I find the logic of these manipulations becomes pretty hairy, particularly when you want to account for various edge-cases. In your example, you need to deal with some environments taking one argument, while others take two. I think it is easier to combine a series of simple regexps with basic text editing commands for this:

(defun enviro-split ()
  "Find begin and end macros, and put them on their own line."
  (interactive)
  (save-excursion
    (beginning-of-buffer)

    ;; loop over document looking for begin and end macros
    (while (re-search-forward "\\\\\\(begin\\|end\\)" nil t)

      ;; when you find one, back up to the beginning of the macro
      (search-backward "\\")

      ;; If it's not at the beginning of the line, add a newline
      (when (not (looking-at "^"))
        (insert "\n"))

      ;; move over the arguments, one or two pairs of matching braces
      (search-forward "{")              ; start of the argument
      (forward-char -1)
      (forward-sexp)                    ; move over the argument
      (if (looking-at "\\s *{")         ; is there a second argument?
          (forward-sexp))               ; move over it if so

      ;; If there is anything other than whitespace following the macro,
      ;; insert a newline
      (if (not (looking-at "\\s *$"))
          (insert "\n")))))

This approach has the advantage of using Emacs' built-in functions for moving over sexps, which is much easier than coming up with your own regexp that can handle multiple, potentially nested, expressions inside braces.

share|improve this answer
    
With optional arguments it get even more complicated. Thanks. I had something similar for a macro that could set `\\` on lines of its own, nice to see that I was not totally wrong in the approach. Of course in the long run one also need to take outcommented data into into consideration. –  daleif Jul 20 '12 at 9:22
    
also thanks for the sexp hint, didn't know that one –  daleif Jul 20 '12 at 9:25
    
Hmm, it is not quite what I need. The test looking in front of say \begin should test to see if it is only whitespace, if not, newline. –  daleif Jul 20 '12 at 10:02
    
(when (not (looking-back "^[ \t]*")) seems to work –  daleif Jul 20 '12 at 10:08
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