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I have recently posted a few questions to understand recursion and backtrack, I felt I got something right now, and tried to write a test, I did solve the sudoku problem, but when I write the code in another format, the code stucks for a while and returns False, which indicates there are no solution to this problem.

grid is a 9x9 list of lists, if list[i][j] is zero then it means it needs to be filled in.

Here is the code which solved the problem:

def correct_solve(grid):

    # if there is no more zeros
    if found_solution(grid):
        return True

    for row in xrange(9):
        for col in xrange(9):
            if grid[row][col] == 0:
                for num in xrange(1, 10):
                    grid[row][col] = num
                    if check_sudoku(grid) == True:
                        if correct_solve(grid) == True:
                            return True
                # there are no numbers which could make
                # a valid solution, so backtrack
                grid[row][col] = 0
                return False

And here is another function which I tried to solve the problem in a different way, but it failed, and I couldn't find out where is the problem

def buggy_solve(grid, col):

    # if there is no more zeros
    if found_solution(grid):
        return True

    # if the col is over 8, make it to 0
    if col > 8:
        col = 0

    for row in xrange(9):
        if grid[row][col] == 0:
            for num in xrange(1, 10):
                grid[row][col] = num
                if check_sudoku(grid) == True:
                    # I tend to move to the next cell, and it seems that
                    # this is correct.
                    if buggy_solve(grid, col + 1) == True:
                        return True

            # if there are no valid solutions, backtrack.
            grid[row][col] = 0
            return False

I tried to debug the program and didn't found anything useful, btw is there any good practice to debug a piece of recursion code?

EDIT:

Here is the matrix I'm using to test:

easy = [[2,9,0,0,0,0,0,7,0],
        [3,0,6,0,0,8,4,0,0],
        [8,0,0,0,4,0,0,0,2],
        [0,2,0,0,3,1,0,0,7],
        [0,0,0,0,8,0,0,0,0],
        [1,0,0,9,5,0,0,6,0],
        [7,0,0,0,9,0,0,0,1],
        [0,0,1,2,0,0,3,0,6],
        [0,3,0,0,0,0,0,5,9]]
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

correct_solve looks over all of the grid, while buggy_solve looks over a single column. This means that, if the problem isn't solved yet, buggy_solve will only look in the current column for a cell to fill in -- if that column doesn't happen to have an empty cell, it will fall out of the outer for loop and exit, without using an explicit return statement. So you'd need code to call buggy_solve on the next column when this happens (and use the appropriate return statement).

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I did call buggy_solve(grid, col + 1) to move to the next column –  shengy Jul 18 '12 at 10:02
    
@shengy: not if there is no row with a 0 in that column –  Scott Hunter Jul 18 '12 at 11:02
    
Got it! I tried a grid which has a col 1 filled from 1 to 9 and the problem shows up. How did you find this problem in such a piece of recursive backtracking code? what is the best practice of debuging such programes? –  shengy Jul 19 '12 at 1:57
    
In this case, by comparing correct_solve & buggy_solve, and recognizing that neither makes any progress until it finds a 0 to replace. –  Scott Hunter Jul 19 '12 at 2:06
    
Can you help to correct the buggy_solve? I tried to add another elif but seems that it doesn't work –  shengy Jul 19 '12 at 2:14

The problem is that your recursive solution never starts to backtrack. Instead it will end up in a endless recursion unless it will accidentally find a solution – which is very unlikely and only works for mostly solved sudokus. Taking those situations out, this is what is happening:

if buggy_solve(grid, col + 1) == True:
    return True

This buggy_solve call will never return false. Because the function will keep trying and iterating over the columns if necessary. And when it reaches the last column, it will start in the first again, overwriting everything that has happened before.

As such, the backtracking will never start. check_sudoku will rarely fail given that we’re still early in the processing and the mostly unfilled sudoku will probably allow multiple values in a given cell.

What you want to do is to prevent buggy_solve from starting all over, i.e. remove the column reset and make it simply return false for invalid columns. That way buggy_solve will return false at some point and the backtracking can actually start.

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I degbuged buggy_solve and it did backtrack, I tried to input a grid which is all zeros. and seems that the program is backtracking correctlly –  shengy Jul 19 '12 at 1:49

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