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let's define the following string s:

s <- "$ A; B; C;"

I need to translate s into:

"$ A; $B; $C;"

the semicolon is the separator. However, $ is only one of 3 special characters which can appear in the string. The data frame m holds all 3 special characters:

m <- data.frame(sp = c("$", "%", "&"))

I first used strsplit to split the string using the semicolon as the separator

> strsplit(s, ";")
[[1]]
[1] "$ A" " B"  " C" 

I think the next step would be to use grep or match to check if the first string contains any of the 3 special characters defined in data frame m. If so, maybe use gsub to insert the matched special character into the remaining sub strings. Then simple use paste with collapse = "" to merge the substrings together again. Does that make sense?

Cheers

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What about something like this:

getmeout = gsub("[$|%|& ]", "", unlist(strsplit(s, ";")))
whatspecial = unique(gsub("[^$|%|&]", "", s))
whatspecial
# [1] "$"
getmeout
# [1] "A" "B" "C"
paste0(whatspecial, getmeout, sep=";", collapse="")
# [1] "$A;$B;$C;"
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Cool. Note that escaping the $&% characters is unnecessary inside []. –  Ari B. Friedman Jul 18 '12 at 10:47
    
@AriB.Friedman, that I did not know. Thanks. I'll edit my answer. –  Ananda Mahto Jul 18 '12 at 10:51
    
Sure. You could also eliminate the |'s. All the rules change inside []. It assumes that you are specifying "OR" and so there's no pipe necessary. What you're actually doing there is looking for four characters: $, &, %, and |. Example to demonstrate: > grepl("[A|B]","$%&|") TRUE > grepl("[AB]","$%&|") FALSE –  Ari B. Friedman Jul 18 '12 at 10:56
    
@AriB.Friedman, cool. I actually haven't done a whole lot with regex--usually just very basic cleanup--so thanks for the lessons! –  Ananda Mahto Jul 18 '12 at 10:59
    
thanks a lot for that solution. it looks the easiest to me and does its job! :-)) –  user969113 Jul 18 '12 at 12:20

Here is one method:

library(stringr)
separator <- '; '

# extract the first part
first.part <- str_split(s, separator)[[1]][1]
first.part
# [1] "$ A"

# try to identify your special character
special <- m$sp[str_detect(first.part, as.character(m$sp))]
special
# [1] $
# Levels: $ & %

# make sure you only matched one of them
stopifnot(length(special) == 1)

# search and replace
gsub(separator, paste(separator, special, sep=""), s)
# [1] "$ A; $B; $C;"

Let me know if I missed some of your assumptions.

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I used methods from the library stringr recently. There are great methods in there to do jobs like that! Thanks to you as well for providing that solution! –  user969113 Jul 18 '12 at 12:22

Back-referencing turns it into a one-liner:

s <- c( "$ A; B; C;", "& A; B; C;", "% A; B; C;" )
ms = c("$", "%", "&")

s <- gsub( paste0("([", paste(ms,collapse="") ,"]) ([A-Z]); ([A-Z]); ([A-Z]);") , "\\1 \\2; \\1 \\3; \\1 \\4" , s) 

> s
[1] "$ A; $ B; $ C" "& A; & B; & C" "% A; % B; % C"

You can then make the regular expression appropriately generic (match more than one space, more than one alphanumeric character, etc.) if you need to.

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Thanks also to your solution. Similar anyway by also using gsub and the paste0 command! :) Great! –  user969113 Jul 18 '12 at 12:21

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