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I have two separate actions that are enumerators.

One can be run independently, the other depends on the first to run afterwards.

I though I would be really smart by doing this:

public IEnumerator<IResult> DoStuffIndependently()
{
   yield return this;
   yield return that;
}

public IEnumerator<IResult> DoStuffBeforeSometimes()
{
   yield return AffectThis;
   yield return AffectThat;

   yield return DoStuffIndependently();
}

This doesn't work, also putting it through a foreach doesn't work either. I don't want to step through everything myself and I'm guessing there is a really easy way to do this.

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Why does putting it through a foreach not work? –  Dan Puzey Jul 18 '12 at 11:17
5  
Is there any specific reason for IEnumerator instead of IEnumerable? –  Branko Dimitrijevic Jul 18 '12 at 11:17
    
Do you actually yeild "this" or can "this" be replaced with "foobar"? –  vidstige Jul 18 '12 at 11:21
    
@DanPuzey does not contain a public definition for 'GetEnumerator' –  Ingó Vals Jul 18 '12 at 11:22
    
@vidstige Yes absolutely, didn't think about this as a keyword when I wrote it. –  Ingó Vals Jul 18 '12 at 11:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want it to be IEnumerator and not IEnumerable, you'll have to iterate through it manually:

public IEnumerator<IResult> DoStuffIndependently() {
    yield return this;
    yield return that;
}

public IEnumerator<IResult> DoStuffBeforeSometimes() {
    yield return AffectThis;
    yield return AffectThat;

    var dsi = DoStuffIndependently();
    while (dsi.MoveNext()) yield return dsi.Current;
}
share|improve this answer
    
pedantic point: you should always check to dispose an iterator. Fortunately this is easy with the generic version, since IDisposable is guaranteed. –  Marc Gravell Jul 18 '12 at 11:28

A method is either an iterator block (yield return etc), xor a regular method (return etc). It cannot be both. As such, to use another iterator, you must iterate it - i.e.

yield return AffectThis;
yield return AffectThat;
using(var iter = DoStuffIndependently()) {
    while(iter.MoveNext()) yield return iter.Current;
}

Alternatively, you could perhaps use Concat to stitch together two existing iterators.

share|improve this answer
    
foreach won't work on IEnumerator. –  Branko Dimitrijevic Jul 18 '12 at 11:25
    
@BrankoDimitrijevic thanks, will correct; I assumed it was IEnumerable –  Marc Gravell Jul 18 '12 at 11:25
    
@BrankoDimitrijevic better? –  Marc Gravell Jul 18 '12 at 11:26
    
Yup, better. :) –  Branko Dimitrijevic Jul 18 '12 at 11:27
    
Concat() doesn't work on IEnumerators, so the alternative solution wouldn't work. –  svick Jul 18 '12 at 11:31

Use IEnumerable instead of IEnumerator and the foreach should work fine:

public IEnumerable<IResult> DoStuffIndependently()
{
   yield return This;
   yield return That;
}

public IEnumerable<IResult> DoStuffBeforeSometimes()
{
   yield return AffectThis;
   yield return AffectThat;
   foreach (var x in DoStuffIndependently())
        yield return x;
}

Alternatively, call IEnumerator.MoveNext explicitly, as Marc suggested.

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