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I need to use a software capacitor.

I have a signal with n samples. and i need to filter it.

Is there a c++ library(or a single function) that contains a software capacitor and other electric components.

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closed as off topic by Andrew Walker, Adriano Repetti, Paul R, Oliver Charlesworth, mtrw Jul 18 '12 at 12:24

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Do you need a low-pass/high-pass filter? If that's what you need consider using a C/C++ DSP library. If not and you want to model an arbitrary electric/electronic circuit then a single function or a library won't be enough at all... –  Adriano Repetti Jul 18 '12 at 11:34
    
Voting to close as off topic because for single components (like a capacitor), the differential equations are well known (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capacitor). For discrete filters, you're probably looking for something like an FIR filter (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finite_impulse_response). For combinations of components, you're probably going to want something more like PSPICE (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PSPICE), none of which is really that related to stackoverflow (maybe try electronics.stackexchange.com). –  Andrew Walker Jul 18 '12 at 11:36
1  
@eharvest the problem is not if you want to model few capacitors or resistors. The point is why you have to do it. You want simply filter the signal? Check DSP SW. You want to simulate a (simple or not) electronic circuit? Go with a program for that, to do it by yourself isn't trivial and it's LONG. –  Adriano Repetti Jul 18 '12 at 11:41
1  
@eharvest but a physical filter will delay your signal... –  Adriano Repetti Jul 18 '12 at 11:43
2  
@eharvest a filter made with a capacitor actually will delay your signal. Your "digital" filter will pop out "zero" for few samples (it depends on the filter order) then you'll get what you want. Moreover any filter (physical of digital) isn't a perfect model and at the beginning will be noisy (so you won't see "clean" signal for much more than the few samples of its delay...). As last: you do not need future samples. Take a look here on MusicDSP.org. –  Adriano Repetti Jul 18 '12 at 11:48

1 Answer 1

If all you want is a really simple function to apply a custom filter to an array of samples then this should do it... Just replace the logic in the loops in the capacitor() function with something more like the proper equations.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

#define INRADS *3.1416/180.0

#define NUM_SAMPLES 1000

double capVoltage = 0;
//this is a simple (capacitor like) filter.
int capacitor(double* sample, long samples, double capacitorValue, double totalTime, double initialCapVoltage){

    capVoltage = initialCapVoltage;

    for (int i = 0; i<= samples-1; i++){ //loop through all the samples
        if (sample[i] > capVoltage){ //charge the cap
            //put your math in here, calculate voltages based on capacitorValue, totalTime and capVoltage
            //this next line is just for testing purposes
            capVoltage += 0.2;
        }
        if (sample[i] < capVoltage){ //discharge the cap
            //put your math in here, calculate voltages based on capacitorValue, totalTime and capVoltage
            //this next line is just for testing purposes
            capVoltage -= 0.2;
        }
        sample[i] = capVoltage;
        printf("Changed sample %d to %f \n", i, sample[i]);
    }

}

double* myVoltageSamples; //generic wave sample
double* myVoltageSamples2; //generic wave sample

int main(){

    myVoltageSamples = new double[NUM_SAMPLES]; //let's say this is 1 sample every millisecond for one second
    myVoltageSamples2 = new double[NUM_SAMPLES]; //let's say this is 1 sample every millisecond for one second

    for (int i = 0; i<= NUM_SAMPLES-1; i++){ //put some data in the sample array
        myVoltageSamples[i] = sin( ( i ) INRADS );      // a simple, generic sin wave
        myVoltageSamples2[i] = myVoltageSamples[i];
        printf("Adding %f to the sample.\n", myVoltageSamples[i]);
    }
    //we now have a generic signal

    //apply your basic (capacitor) filter
    capacitor(myVoltageSamples2, NUM_SAMPLES, 0.001, 1000, 0); //1mF cap, one second, start voltage = 0

    //compare the start and finish:
    printf("first signal:\n");
    for (int i = 0; i<= NUM_SAMPLES-1; i++){ //put some data in the sample array
        for (int j = 0; j<=((int)(myVoltageSamples[i]*20))+20-1; j++){
            printf(".");
        }
        printf("X\n");
    }

    printf("second signal:\n");
    for (int i = 0; i<= NUM_SAMPLES-1; i++){ //put some data in the sample array
        for (int j = 0; j<=((int)(myVoltageSamples2[i]*20))+20-1; j++){
            printf(".");
        }
        printf("X\n");
    }

    delete myVoltageSamples;
    delete myVoltageSamples2;

}
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The two loops at the bottom of the main function are just to provide a visual representation of the signals in the command line. –  DanJAB Jul 18 '12 at 12:25

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