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All I waint to do is launch a thread and see if it has finished in a certain period of time.

OS: linux; language: C++.

I'd like not to use non portable functions (like suggested in this answer).

Is there any way to do that, other than using a mutex and a condition variable (as suggested here)? There is no shared data between the two threads, so technically I would not need a mutex. All I want is, for the function that launches the thread, to continue if

  • thread has finished or

  • a certain time elapsed.

... and keep the code as simple as I can.

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I highly recommend the boost thread libraries, or there are some concurrency goodies in C++11, if you have a compiler that supports them. How precise a timing do you need for this? Profiling might be the way to go. –  sam Jul 18 '12 at 12:48
1  
What's wrong with a condition variable, a bool flag and a mutex? –  Torsten Robitzki Jul 18 '12 at 12:51
    
sam: thanks, I'll read more into that. @Torsten: I want to keep it as simple as possible and it seemed to be too much for a simple fact like that. Just thought I should ask. However, as a last resort I'll come to that. –  Ioanna Jul 18 '12 at 12:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want to use boost::thread, the "usual" bool flag, condition variable, mutex approach is as simple as:

bool ready = false;
boost::mutex              mutex;
boost::condition_variable cv;

// function to be executed by your thread
void foo() 
{
    // lengthy calculation
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock( mutex );
    ready = true;
    cv.notify_one();
}

// will return, if the thread stopped
bool wait_for_foo( time_point abs_time )
{
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock( mutex );

    while ( !ready && cv.wait_until( lock, abs_time ) != cv_status::no_timeout )
      ;

    return ready;
}

Ok, isn't much simpler then using posix ;-)

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Yep, a combination of Nicolai's solution with a condition variable, in order to avoid the polling and the spinning. I'll use it with posix, though, as the code will later be ported to linux arm. (a mutex, a condition variable and a bool only to wait for a thread to finish... but it seems to be the best way) –  Ioanna Jul 18 '12 at 13:39
1  
wait_until doesn't return bool, and takes a time_point not a duration. I think you mean while (!ready && cv.wait_until(lock, abstime) != cv_status::timeout) –  Jonathan Wakely Jul 18 '12 at 14:53
    
ain't it dangerous to make ready a 'simple' bool type? IMO you should add 'volatile' before or compiler might do value optymizations and under release code you might get different behavior, right? –  zodi Jul 18 '12 at 15:03
    
@zodi volatile has usually nothing to do with threading. If you have a compiler / library pair that enables you to write multithreading software, you get the guaranty that this pair works like documented. –  Torsten Robitzki Jul 18 '12 at 15:06
    
oh but it does much with threading - info from msdn: "The volatile keyword is a type qualifier used to declare that an object can be modified in the program by something such as the operating system, the hardware, or a concurrently executing thread. (...) Microsoft specific - Objects declared as volatile are not used in certain optimizations because their values can change at any time. The system always reads the current value of a volatile object at the point it is requested, even if a previous instruction asked for a value from the same object." –  zodi Jul 18 '12 at 15:19

You don't even need a condition variable, you could just have the other thread lock a mutex on entry and unlock it when it's finished, and have the launching thread use pthread_mutex_timedlock (optional in older versions of POSIX, required in POSIX 2008) to try to acquire the mutex, timing out if the other thread hasn't finished.

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How do you make sure, that the started thread acquire the mutex before the waiting thread? –  Torsten Robitzki Jul 18 '12 at 13:07
    
The only problem is that if the other thread does not get to lock the mutex before the first one checks for it, it will not wait at all... So I tried locking it before launching the thread, but afterwards it would try to lock it again (the timedlock), which is not ok, as it is already locked by the same thread... I hope I wrote that clear enough... –  Ioanna Jul 18 '12 at 13:07
1  
Add a simple boolean initialized to false, and have the second thread flip it to true on startup (when already holding the mutex). Then the main thread would loop around pthread_mutex_timedlock, releasing the mutex and retrying if that boolean is still false. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Jul 18 '12 at 13:18
1  
This might be very ineffective because you have to poll and second, a mutex is usually designed with a fast path in mind. On a multi processor machine there might be some spinning before the waiting thread is put to block. –  Torsten Robitzki Jul 18 '12 at 13:26
1  
Yup, have to admit you are right about UP machines. Keep forgetting those things exist :) –  Nikolai N Fetissov Jul 18 '12 at 13:56

you can create timer thread and once timer is reached to a timeout cancel that thraed. No need to have mutex.code is like:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <pthread.h>

#define TIMEOUT 1*60 //in secend
int count = 0;
pthread_t t_main;   //Thread id for main thread
void * timer_thread()
{
    while (TIMEOUT > count)
    {
        sleep(1);  //sleep for a secand
        count++;
    }
    printf("killinn main thread\n");
    pthread_cancel(t_main); // cancel main thread

}
void * m_thread()
{
    pthread_t t_timer; //Thread id for timer thread
    if (-1 == pthread_create(&t_timer, NULL, timer_thread, NULL))
    {
        perror("pthread_create");
        return NULL;
    }
    //DO your work...
    while(1)
    {
        sleep(2);
    }
}

int main()
{
        if ( -1 == pthread_create(&t_main, NULL, m_thread, NULL))
    {
        perror("pthread_create");
        return -1;
    }
    if (-1 == pthread_join(t_main, NULL))
    {
        perror("pthread_join");
        return -1;
    }
    return 0;
}
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